Op. 68

 

REVELATIONS

OF AN IDEOLOGICAL PHILOSOPHER

 

Cyclic Philosophy

 

Copyright 1997-2010 John O'Loughlin

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CONTENTS

 

Cycles 1-35

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CYCLE ONE

 

1.   When considered in relation to the elements, it could be argued that the Seasons proceed from Summer to Autumn via Winter and Spring, as from fire to air via water and vegetation (earth).  For it does seem that there is a definite correlation between Summer and fire, the season of the sun par excellence; between Winter and water, the season of rain and frost and/or snow par excellence; between Spring and vegetation, the season of vegetative growth par excellence; and between Autumn and air, the season of wind and gales par excellence.

 

2.   In gender terms, I would have to identify Summer and Winter with the female aspect of things and, by contrast, Spring and Autumn with their male aspect, the former seasons respectively diabolic (superfeminine-to-subfeminine) and feminine, the latter seasons masculine and divine (submasculine-to-supermasculine) respectively.

 

3.   With regard to religious contexts, one could associate Summer with Hell, Winter with Purgatory, Spring with the Earth, and Autumn with Heaven, though only, of course, in very general and approximate terms.

 

4.   Like fire and water, Summer and Winter are primary seasons, given their female bias towards objectivity, whereas Spring and Autumn, by contrast, are comparatively secondary seasons, given their male bias, through vegetation and air, for subjectivity.

 

5.   In general terms, females correspond to the primary seasons of Summer and Winter, fire and water, while males, by contrast, correspond to the secondary seasons of Spring and Autumn, vegetation and air.

 

6.   With regard to sartorial options, one could argue that dresses correlate with Summer and skirts with Winter, whereas trousers (or some jean-like variant thereof) correlate with Spring and zippersuits with Autumn.

 

7.   I find it difficult, in view of the above contentions, not to regard dresses as being as incompatible with, and therefore irrelevant to, males ... as zippersuits would be incompatible with, and therefore irrelevant to, females, bearing in mind their respective correlations with fire and air, or Summer and Autumn.

 

8.   Likewise, I would have to regard skirts as being as incompatible with, and therefore irrelevant to, males ... as trousers are incompatible with, and therefore irrelevant to, females, bearing in mind their respective correlations with water and vegetation, Winter and Spring.

 

9.   A male in a dress and/or skirt would be as bent, and therefore gender-contradictory, as a female in trousers and/or zippersuit.  For, in the one case, a preponderantly subjective creature would be advertising himself objectively, whereas in the other case a predominantly objective creature would be advertising herself subjectively.  The former would be underestimating himself, while the latter would be overestimating herself.

 

10.  The Seasons are not equal, any more than people in general are equal.  Equalitarianism is almost invariably a doctrine of 'the low' and 'the base' which works to reduce everything, including life itself, to the lowest-common-denominator ... of mundane assessment.

 

11.  Democracy is a product of equalitarianism, as, before it, was Christianity, which sought to elevate 'the humble' to positions of equality, in God's eyes, with 'the noble'!

 

12.  Protestantism did much the same thing as Catholicism in reverse, by reducing 'the noble' to positions of equality, in Christ's eyes, with 'the humble'.  In this respect, it paved the way for democracy, which took the process a step further by doing away with 'the noble' altogether, thereby transforming 'the meek' from humble to arrogant.

 

13.  This process has now gone so far that plebeian arrogance is taken for granted by the majority of people in countries where man is the measure of all things, and all things, seemingly, must bow to him.

 

14.  The notion of 'in God's eyes' or 'in God's sight' is a contradiction in terms, since sight is less characteristic of God or what is godly than of the Devil, having affiliations with noumenal objectivity, and thus with what some more conventional souls would identify with 'original sin', but which I prefer to identify with the inception of Cupidian vice.

 

15.  For Cupid, with bow drawn back to fire his arrow diagonally downwards upon the heart, is the perfect illustration of noumenal objectivity, which stretches, in superfeminine-to-subfeminine fashion, from eyes to heart.

 

16.  As a rule, a female does not become a male, nor does a male, with few exceptions, become a female.  The one is conditioned by objective criteria originating in a vacuum (the womb) and the other by subjective criteria centred in a plenum (the scrotum).  These criteria are effectively immutable.

 

17.  As to the question of whether females are biologically or socially conditioned, it seems to me that they are both biologically conditioned (as alluded to above) and socially conditioned, but that the ratio of the one to the other will vary with the individual, the society, the ethnicity, and even the age in which females live, so that no one factor is ever exclusively prominent.

 

18.  I would argue that in a Christian age, or age stressing sensibility, the conditioning emphasis will be more social than biological, but that in a non-Christian, or heathen, age like the twentieth century, which was overwhelmingly sensual, the conditioning emphasis will be more biological than social.  For social conditioning is what pegs females down to a subordinate position to males in deference to the latter's natural determinism, whereas biological conditioning releases females from social constraints and encourages males to defer, by contrast, to free will, a thing having more intimate connections with biological conditioning than many men, and not a few women, might suppose.  In fact, it would be no exaggeration to say that free will stems from biological conditioning in relation to a vacuous premise (the womb) that conduces towards objectivity.  And in this respect it is quintessentially female.

 

 

CYCLE TWO

 

1.   To contrast, on a European basis, the outer fire of French materialism with the inner fire of Dutch materialism, the former corresponding, in personal terms, to the eyes and the latter to the heart, so that we have a space-time axis which contrasts metachemical sensuality with metachemical sensibility.

 

2.   Likewise, to contrast the outer water of English realism with the inner water of Italian realism, the former corresponding, in personal terms, to the tongue and the latter to the womb, so that we have a volume-mass axis which contrasts chemical sensuality with chemical sensibility.

 

3.   Similarly, to contrast the outer vegetation of Spanish naturalism with the inner vegetation of Russian naturalism, the former corresponding, in personal terms, to the phallus and the latter to the brain, so that we have a mass-volume axis which contrasts physical sensuality with physical sensibility.

 

4.   Finally, to contrast the outer air of German idealism with the inner air of Irish idealism, the former corresponding, in personal terms, to the ears and the latter to the lungs, so that we have a time-space axis which contrasts metaphysical sensuality with metaphysical sensibility.

 

5.   Of course, each of the above aphorisms has reference to a generalization, on a European-wide basis, such that focuses on what is conceived to be the most applicable element to each of the aforementioned countries, further subdividing this element along sensual and sensible lines in relation to outer and inner contexts.

 

6.   Thus the Frenchman, the Englishman, the Spaniard, and the German are conceived as being on the sensual, or outer, side of their respective elements, viz. fire, water, vegetation, and air, whereas the Dutchman, the Italian, the Russian, and the Irishman are conceived, by contrast, as being on the sensible, or inner, side of those same elements respectively.

 

7.   Thus where the eyes, the tongue, the phallus, and the ears are the (sensual) organs with which Frenchmen, Englishmen, Spaniards, and Germans have been respectively identified, the heart, the womb, the brain, and the lungs are the (sensible) organs with which, directly or indirectly, I tend to identify a majority of Dutchmen, Italians, Russians, and Irishmen.

 

8.   One is thereby contrasting, in very general cultural terms, the outer evil of France with the inner evil of Holland in relation to fiery materialism; the outer goodness of England with the inner goodness of Italy in relation to watery realism; the outer folly of Spain with the inner folly of Russia in relation to vegetative naturalism; and the outer wisdom of Germany with the inner wisdom of Ireland in relation to airy idealism.

 

9.   In simple religious terms, this would suggest that whereas fundamentalism would be chiefly characteristic of both France and Holland in their respective ways (eyes/heart), humanism would be no-less chiefly characteristic of England and Italy in their respective ways (tongue/womb).

 

10.  Likewise, I am suggesting that whereas nonconformism would be chiefly characteristic of both Spain and Russia in their respective ways (phallus/brain), transcendentalism would be no-less chiefly characteristic of Germany and Ireland in their respective ways (ears/lungs).

 

11.  In general cultural terms, France and Holland should be identified with a painterly tradition, since painting is the art form that corresponds most closely to the element of fire, whereas England and Italy should be identified with a writerly tradition, since writing is the art form that corresponds most closely to the element of water.

 

12.  Similarly, Spain and Russia should be identified with a sculptural tradition, since sculpture is the art form that corresponds most closely to the element of vegetation (earth, clay), whereas Germany and Ireland should be identified with a musical tradition, since music is the art form that corresponds most closely to the element of air.

 

13.  In each of the above aphorisms, the cultural generalization to which each of the countries is subjected has to be considered in relation to the Heathen/Christian dichotomy, here implicit, between sensuality and sensibility, the outer, or 'once-born', manifestations of the respective elements and their inner, or 're-born', manifestations thereof.

 

14.  Hence French painting, for example, will be rather more outer, or 'once born', than Dutch painting, whilst English literature will be correspondingly more sensual, or heathenistic, than Italian literature.

 

15.  Conversely, Russian sculpture will be rather more inner, or 're-born', than Spanish sculpture, whilst Irish music will be correspondingly more sensible, or Christian, than German music.

 

 

CYCLE THREE

 

1.   The contention, expressed above, that Italy should be identified with watery re-birth (the womb) lends itself to the notion that Italian sensibility is not only Marian as opposed to, say, Christic, but that Roman Catholicism, the mode of Christianity one would most identify with Italy, is accordingly biased towards Marianism, in contrast to the Christic bias of, say, Eastern Orthodoxy in connection with the Russian Church.

 

2.   Now if Romanism is the Catholicism of Mary and Orthodoxy, at least in its Russian manifestation, the Catholicism of Christ, then one would have reason to believe that Greek Orthodoxy was, in comparative terms, the Catholicism of the Father, and what may be called Celtic Radicalism the Catholicism of the Holy Spirit.

 

3.   Put elementally, in terms of fire, water, vegetation, and air, this would suggest that Catholicism could be regarded as stretching from fiery fundamentalism on the Far Left, as it were, of the Christian spectrum to airy transcendentalism on the Far Right, with watery humanism and vegetative nonconformism holding comparatively left- and right-wing positions in between - as, overall, from Greek Orthodoxy to Celtic Radicalism via Roman Catholicism and Russian Orthodoxy.

 

4.   Hence Christianity would afford us the contrast, within the same religion, of Greek fieriness, Italian wateriness, Russian vegetativeness, and Irish airiness, with corresponding distinctions of emphasis between the Father, the Mother, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.

 

5.   If this were so, then we can believe that the Gaelic aspects of Irish culture, including stout and sport, owe more to Celtic Radicalism than ever they do to Roman Catholicism, and that there is accordingly a struggle at large in Ireland between the Marian culture of the official church and the spiritual culture of the church which, in its Celtic idealism, most corresponds to Gaelic sensibility.

 

6.   That which is best in and about Ireland would therefore be less Roman than Celtic, and we may hold that only in the idealism of the Celtic Church would the Irish people come anywhere near the true spirituality of full-blown transcendentalism.

 

7.   The Social Transcendentalism to which I, as a self-professed Messiah, subscribe would, of course, leave the Christian spirituality of Celtic Radicalism far behind in its advocacy of transcendental meditation and total break with Biblical adherence, through the Old Testament, to Creator-based concepts of God, but, in comparative terms, Celtic Radicalism would seem to be the mode of Christianity which does most justice, within the restricted parameters of the Catholic Church, to Christian idealism, with due reference, in consequence, to the Holy Ghost.

 

8.   In this respect, it could be regarded as standing above both the Christic bias of Russian Orthodoxy and the Marian bias of Roman Catholicism, as air transcends both vegetation and water.... Which is not to say that vegetation and water don't religiously exist in Ireland, but, rather, that they would be less characteristic of the Celtic majority's sensibility than air, bearing in mind the extent to which Irish Celts are historically drawn, through Gaelic culture, to airy transcendentalism in response, in no small measure, to the mountainous uplands which typify a not-inconsiderable proportion of the island of Ireland.

 

9.   Which, of course, is also true of Scottish and Welsh Celts, whose Gaelic traditions display a bias towards airy sensibility over vegetative and watery, not to mention fiery, parallels existing elsewhere.

 

10.  Indeed, just as Scottish and/or Welsh Gaels can be added to their Irish counterparts in relation to airy sensibility, often culturally manifesting itself through piping of one kind or another, so it seems to me that the Portuguese should be added to the Germans where airy sensuality is concerned, since Portugal is by no means as flat or plain-like as Spain, and Portuguese influence in South America betrays ample evidence of an airy bias not incompatible with German influence there.

 

11.  However that may be, there is scope, in Europe, for making fourfold ethnic distinctions, based on the elements, between fiery Gallic, watery Nordic, vegetative Slavic, and airy Celtic, with Latin or, rather, Hispanic (in broad terms), Teutonic, Slavonic, and Gaelic cultural implications respectively.

 

12.  The Gaul and the Gael are not as close as a superficial analysis could lead one to believe, but are as antipodes in a gender dichotomy which places Gallic and Nordic on one side of the fence, and Slavic and Celtic on the other - the former as fire and water in relation to female alternatives, the latter as vegetation and air in relation to male ones.

 

13.  Verily, the Slavic and Celtic side of the ethnic divide, being subjective, is beyond the objectivity of its female side, as folly and wisdom lie beyond evil and good, the one relatively so, the other absolutely so, as befitting the distinction between vegetative sin and airy grace.

 

14.  Such, in very general terms, is how I conceive of the principal European peoples, although, in practice, they are much more mixed than such straightforward theories would allow, and all countries contain minorities, in any case, which seem to elude neat pigeonholing in relation to Christianity, either because they come from outside Europe or because they are products of cross-breeding, or for some other no-less cogent reason.  My task as a philosopher is simply to establish broad categories whereby some pattern or methodology can be maintained, to the end of securing an enhanced understanding of life in general terms.  And in this respect I believe I have succeeded where others, before me, have failed.

 

 

CYCLE FOUR

 

1.   If art, literature, sculpture, and music can be pursued on either a sensual or a sensible basis, as I have argued, then it must follow that criteria of hierarchical evaluation regarding the principal art forms will differ according to whether they are demonstrably 'once born' or 're-born', outer or inner, in the manner described.

 

2.   Hence we should have no difficulty in establishing that predominantly sensual manifestations of these art forms will reflect heathenistic criteria of evaluation, whereas their sensible counterparts will reflect Christian criteria, in due 're-born' vein.

 

3.   Because the elements follow a descending hierarchy, based on their degree of sensuality, from fire to air via water and vegetation in 'once born', or heathenistic, mode, we may hold that the hierarchical order of art forms will reflect this descent when they are recognizably sensual, in consequence of which art (painting) will be adjudged the highest art form, literature the second highest, sculpture the third highest or, rather, second lowest art-form, and music the lowest, as we proceed, in primary fashion, from fire to water and, in secondary fashion, from vegetation to air.

 

4.   Conversely, because the elements follow an ascending hierarchy, based on their degree of sensibility, from fire to air via water and vegetation in 're-born', or Christian, mode, we may hold that the hierarchical order of art forms will reflect this ascent when they are recognizably sensible, in consequence of which art (painting) will be adjudged the lowest art form, literature the second lowest, sculpture the third lowest or, rather, second highest art-form, and music the highest, as we proceed, in secondary vein, from fire to water, and, in primary vein, from vegetation to air.

 

5.   Thus whether painting, for example, be adjudged a first- or a fourth-rate art form will depend on whether it is recognizably sensual, and heathenistic, or sensible, and Christian, since in the one case it will approximate to the eyes, whereas in the other case its approximation will be to the heart.

 

6.   Likewise, whether literature be adjudged a second- or a third-rate art form will depend on whether it is recognizably sensual, and 'once born', or sensible, and 're-born', since in the one case it will approximate to the tongue, whereas in the other case its approximation will be to the womb.

 

7.   Similarly, whether sculpture be adjudged a third- or a second-rate art form will depend on whether it is recognizably sensual, and heathenistic, or sensible, and Christian, since in the one case it will approximate to the flesh (of which the phallus is effective cynosure), whereas in the other case its approximation will be to the brain.

 

8.   Finally, whether music be adjudged a fourth- or a first-rate art form will depend on whether it is recognizably sensual, and 'once born', or sensible, and 're-born', since in the one case it will approximate to the ears, whereas in the other case its approximation will be to the lungs.

 

9.   Now, as I have already argued in earlier texts, the senses or, more correctly, sensualities (of outer sense) reflect a hierarchy in which the eyes dominate the ears 'up above', on the noumenal planes of Space and Time, whereas 'down below', on the phenomenal planes of Volume and Mass, the tongue dominates the phallic flesh.

 

10.  Hence, with art corresponding, through its fiery correlation, to the eyes, and music corresponding, through its airy correlation, to the ears, there can be no question that, where noumenal sensuality is concerned, art pulls rank on music, pretty much, I have to say, as the Devil on God, or Hell on Heaven.

 

11.  Likewise, with literature corresponding, through its watery correlation, to the tongue, and sculpture corresponding, through its vegetative correlation, to the flesh, there can be no question that, where phenomenal sensuality is concerned, literature pulls rank on sculpture, pretty much, it has to be said, as woman on man, or purgatory on the earth.

 

12.  Hence, not only does art dominate music and literature dominate sculpture in sensuality, but art and literature, corresponding to the objective elements (of fire and water) will take primary precedence over sculpture and music, confining both to third- and fourth-rate positions, respectively, in the overall hierarchy of the Arts.

 

13.  Again, as I have argued in earlier texts, the sensibilities (of inner sense) reflect a hierarchy in which the lungs dominate or, rather, transcend the heart 'up above', on the noumenal planes of Space and Time, whereas 'down below', on the phenomenal planes of Volume and Mass, the brain transcends the womb.

 

14.  Hence, with music corresponding, through its airy correlation, to the lungs, and art corresponding, through its fiery correlation, to the heart, there can be no doubt that, where noumenal sensibility is concerned, music transcends art, pretty much, I have to say, as God transcends the Devil, or Heaven transcends Hell.

 

15.  Similarly, with sculpture corresponding, through its vegetative correlation, to the brain, and literature corresponding, through its watery correlation, to the womb, there can be no question that, where phenomenal sensibility is concerned, sculpture transcends literature, pretty much, it has to be said, as man transcends woman, or the earth transcends purgatory.

 

16.  Hence not only does music transcend art and sculpture transcend literature in sensibility, but music and sculpture, corresponding to the subjective elements (of air and vegetation), will take primary precedence over art and literature, confining both to fourth- and third-rate positions, respectively, in the overall hierarchy of the Arts.

 

17.  There can be no shadow of a doubt that sensuality favours a female-oriented hierarchy of the Arts, in complete contrast to the male-oriented hierarchy of the Arts that accrues to the pursuit, in 're-born', or Christian, terms, of creative sensibility.

 

18.  In the one case, that of the Arts treated sensuously, the Devil rules in painterly form, whereas in the other case, that of the Arts treated sensibly, God leads in musical form or, more correctly, content.

 

19.  On the one hand, the Devil rules woman, who governs man, who effectively renounces God.  On the other hand, God leads man, who transcends woman, who effectively renounces the Devil.  And this, despite the inclusion (in radically 'bovaryized' guises) of both music and art respectively.

 

20.  Really, where the distinction between form and content is concerned, we are dealing with appearance and essence, the antipodes of creative endeavour, and have to distinguish, furthermore, between apparent form and quantitative form on the one hand, and qualitative content and essential content on the other hand.

 

21.  Hence, regarded collectively, the Arts range from apparent form to essential content via quantitative form and qualitative content, as from art to music via literature and sculpture, though never more so than when each of them is in its per se manifestation, and therefore either sensual in relation to fire and water or sensible in relation to vegetation and air, as regarding art and literature on the one hand, but sculpture and music on the other.  For it has to be admitted that each of the Arts can be pursued in 'bovaryized' terms as well as in its most appropriate manifestation.

 

22.  Hence I am contending that art and literature are only in their per se manifestations in sensuality, where they are respectively first- and second-rate art forms, but that in sensibility they become 'bovaryized' as respectively fourth- and third-rate art forms.

 

23.  Likewise, I am contending that sculpture and music are only in their per se manifestations in sensibility, where they are respectively second- and first-rate art forms, but that in sensuality they become 'bovaryized' as respectively third- and fourth-rate art forms.

 

24.  Strictly speaking, 'art form' is not the term to apply to sculpture and music in their per se, or most authentic, manifestations, since it is then that content is uppermost in due subjective vein.

 

25.  Similarly, 'art form' is hardly the most appropriate term to apply to art and literature in their 'bovaryized', or most inauthentic, manifestations, since it is content which is then uppermost in due subjective vein.

 

 

CYCLE FIVE

 

1.   What can be deduced from the above contentions is that whereas art will be most 'true' to itself when there is most form and least content, as in apparent form, music will only be most 'true' to itself when there is most content and least form, as in essential content.

 

2.   Likewise, we can deduce that whereas literature will be most 'true' to itself when there is most or, rather, more (compared to most) form and less (compared to least) content, as in quantitative form, sculpture will only be most 'true' to itself when there is more (compared to most) content and less (compared to least) form, as in qualitative content.

 

3.   Art will accordingly be most 'true' to itself in completely opposite fashion to music, and we can safely maintain that in neither context will there be much evidence of 'molecular' relativity but, rather, of 'elemental' absolutism such that smacks of contrary orders of abstraction - the one with respect to appearance, the other with respect to essence.

 

4.   Literature will accordingly be most 'true' to itself in completely opposite fashion to sculpture, and we can safely maintain that in neither context will there be much evidence of 'elemental' absolutism but, rather, of 'molecular' relativity such that smacks of contrary orders of representation - the one with respect to quantity, the other with respect to quality.

 

5.   One could argue, in political terms, that whereas the per se of art will be extreme left-wing, the per se of music, by contrast, will be extreme right-wing, since we are dealing with an elemental dichotomy between apparent form and essential content, as between most form/least content and most content/least form.

 

6.   Likewise, one could argue that whereas the per se of literature will be left wing, the per se of sculpture, by contrast, will be right wing, since we are dealing with a molecular dichotomy between quantitative form and qualitative content, as between more (compared to most) form/less (compared to least) content and more (compared to most) content/less (compared to least) form.

 

7.   In subatomic terms, form is equivalent to particles and content to wavicles, so that most form/least content is commensurate with most particles/least wavicles, while most content/least form is commensurate with most wavicles/least particles.

 

8.   Similarly, more (compared to most) form/less (compared to least) content is commensurate with more particles/less wavicles, while more (compared to most) content/less (compared to least) form is commensurate with more wavicles/less particles.

 

9.   Since art is in its per se manifestation in most form/least content, it follows that, corresponding to most particles/least wavicles, art is a scientific mode of cultural creativity which will be 'once bovaryized' in more (compared to most) form/less (compared to least) content, 'twice bovaryized' in less (compared to least) form/more (compared to most) content, and 'thrice bovaryized' in least form/most content.

 

10.  These three 'bovaryized' options are respectively political, economic, and religious subdivisions of fiery metachemistry in relation to more (compared to most) particles/less (compared to least) wavicles, less (compared to least) particles/more (compared to most) wavicles, and least particles/most wavicles within the photon-photino axis of space-time objectivity.

 

11.  Since literature is in its per se manifestation in more (compared to most) form/less (compared to least) content, it follows that, corresponding to more (compared to most) particles/less (compared to least) wavicles, literature is a political mode of cultural creativity which will be 'once bovaryized' in most form/least content, 'twice bovaryized' in least form/most content, and 'thrice bovaryized' in less (compared to least) form/more (compared to most) content.

 

12.  These three 'bovaryized' options are respectively scientific, religious, and economic subdivisions of watery chemistry in relation to most particles/least wavicles, least particles/most wavicles, and less (compared to least) particles/more (compared to most) wavicles within the electron-electrino (conventional) and/or positron-positrino (radical) axis of volume-mass objectivity.

 

13.  Since sculpture is in its per se manifestation in more (compared to most) content/less (compared to least) form, it follows that, corresponding to more (compared to most) wavicles/less (compared to least) particles, sculpture is an economic mode of cultural creativity which will be 'once bovaryized' in most content/least form, 'twice bovaryized' in least content/most form, and 'thrice bovaryized' in less (compared to least) content/more (compared to most) form.

 

14.  These three 'bovaryized' options are respectively religious, scientific, and political subdivisions of vegetative physics in relation to most wavicles/least particles, least wavicles/most particles, and less (compared to least) wavicles/more (compared to most) particles within the neutron-neutrino (conventional) and/or deuteron/deuterino (radical) axis of mass-volume subjectivity.

 

15.  Since music is in its per se manifestation in most content/least form, it follows that, corresponding to most wavicles/least particles, music is a religious mode of cultural creativity which will be 'once bovaryized' in more (compared to most) content/less (compared to least) form, 'twice bovaryized' in less (compared to least) content/more (compared to most) form, and 'thrice bovaryized' in least content/most form.

 

16.  These three 'bovaryized' options are respectively economic, political, and scientific subdivisions of airy metaphysics in relation to more (compared to most) wavicles/less (compared to least) particles, less (compared to least) wavicles/more (compared to most) particles, and least wavicles/most particles within the proton-protino axis of time-space subjectivity.

 

17.  In brief, art ceases to be authentic in proportion to the extent to which it departs science for politics, economics, or religion, becoming progressively less authentic and/or more inauthentic the further it moves from its elemental basis in apparent form.

 

18.  Likewise, literature ceases to be authentic in proportion to the extent to which it departs politics for science, religion, or economics, becoming progressively less authentic and/or more inauthentic the further it moves from its molecular basis in quantitative form.

 

19.  Similarly, sculpture ceases to be authentic in proportion to the extent to which it departs economics for religion, science, or politics, becoming progressively less authentic and/or more inauthentic the further it moves from its molecular basis in qualitative content.

 

20.  Finally, music ceases to be authentic in proportion to the extent to which it departs religion for economics, politics, or science, becoming progressively less authentic and/or more inauthentic the further it moves from its elemental basis in essential content.

 

21.  Art that is non-scientific, in its departure from apparent form, will be quasi-political, quasi-economic, or quasi-religious, as the case may be.

 

22.  Literature that is non-political, in its departure from quantitative form, will be quasi-scientific, quasi-religious, or quasi-economic, as the case may be.

 

23.  Sculpture that is non-economic, in its departure from qualitative content, will be quasi-religious, quasi-scientific, or quasi-political, as the case may be.

 

24.  Music that is non-religious, in its departure from essential content, will be quasi-economic, quasi-political, or quasi-scientific, as the case may be.

 

25.  Art is the scientific art form par excellence, in which fire is granted cultural illustration.

 

26.  Literature is the political art form par excellence, in which water is granted cultural illustration.

 

27.  Sculpture is the economic art form par excellence, in which vegetation (earth) is granted cultural illustration.

 

28.  Music is the religious art form par excellence, in which air is granted cultural illustration.

 

29.  The artist relates to the world, whether negatively or positively, from the standpoint of fire, and thus in relation, principally, to ugliness and/or beauty.

 

30.  The writer relates to the world, whether negatively or positively, from the standpoint of water, and thus in relation, principally, to weakness and/or strength.

 

31.  The sculptor relates to the world, whether negatively or positively, from the standpoint of vegetation (earth), and thus in relation, principally, to ignorance and/or knowledge.

 

32.  The musician relates to the world, whether negatively or positively, from the standpoint of air, and thus in relation, principally, to falsity and/or truth.

 

33.  The genuine artist is a kind of cultural Devil (superfeminine-to-subfeminine) who, interpreting life from the standpoint of fire, affirms the scientific perspective of apparent form in relation to space-time objectivity.

 

34.  The genuine writer is a kind of cultural woman (upper-feminine-to-lower-feminine) who, interpreting life from the standpoint of water, affirms the political perspective of quantitative form in relation to volume-mass objectivity.

 

35.  The genuine sculptor is a kind of cultural man (lower-masculine-to-upper-masculine) who, interpreting life from the standpoint of vegetation, affirms the economic perspective of qualitative content in relation to mass-volume subjectivity.

 

36.  The genuine musician is a kind of cultural God (submasculine-to-supermasculine) who, interpreting life from the standpoint of air, affirms the religious perspective of essential content in relation to time-space subjectivity.

 

 

CYCLE SIX

 

1.   From the perceptions of space-time objectivity to the receptions of time-space subjectivity via the deceptions of volume-mass objectivity and the conceptions of mass-volume subjectivity, as we proceed from fire to air via water and vegetation.

 

2.   To pass from perception to deception, or vice versa, within female parameters, but from conception to reception, or vice versa, within male parameters.

 

3.   Just as the artist perceives objects through noumenal objectivity, so the writer (the dramatist) deceives objects through phenomenal objectivity.

 

4.   Just as the sculptor conceives subjects through phenomenal subjectivity, so the musician receives subjects through noumenal subjectivity.

 

5.   As a rule, females are disposed to form (in ratios of most and/or more particles) to a greater extent than to content, whereas males are disposed to content (in ratios of more and/or most wavicles) to a greater extent than to form.

 

6.   One can no more have form without content than content without form, but the ratio of the one to the other will determine to what extent the object or subject is either apparent or essential or, failing that, quantitative or qualitative.

 

7.   That which is objective, being female, will always have a greater overall ratio of form to content, whereas that which is subjective, being male, will have a greater overall ratio of content to form.

 

8.   Form is something one either expresses (if noumenal) or compresses (if phenomenal), while content is something one either depresses (if phenomenal) or impresses (if noumenal).

 

9.   Expression stands to impression as particles to wavicles in Space and Time, while compression stands to depression as particles to wavicles in Volume and Mass.

 

10.  The artist expresses fire (paint) and the writer compresses water (ink), while the sculptor depresses vegetation (clay) and the musician impresses air (notes).

 

11.  In expressing fire, the artist represses air, while the musician, in impressing air, represses fire.

 

12.  In compressing water, the writer represses vegetation, while the sculptor, in depressing vegetation, represses water.

 

13.  One represses that which is not germane to one's particular field of creativity, whether in noumenal terms 'up above' or in phenomenal terms 'down below'.

 

14.  Repression is therefore a crucial aspect of sustained commitment to any given art form, since it is only by repressing that which is contrary to one's preferred medium of creativity that one can persist in it at all.

 

15.  Likewise the Devil represses God in order to express fire, while God represses the Devil in order to impress air.

 

16.  In similar fashion, woman represses man in order to compress water, while man represses woman in order to depress vegetation.

 

17.  Expression and compression are both objective dispositions, while depression and impression are their subjective counterparts.

 

18.  Fire is the most expressive of elements and air the most impressive, just as science is the most expressive of disciplines and religion the most impressive.

 

19.  Water is the most compressive of elements and vegetation the most depressive, just as politics is the most compressive of disciplines and economics the most depressive.

 

20.  Females generally have greater expressive and/or compressive powers than males, just as males generally have greater depressive and/or impressive powers than females.

 

21.  Dresses express the soul and skirts compress the id (instinct), whereas trousers depress the intellect (knowledge-forming faculty) and zippersuits impress the spirit.

 

22.  Mind can be expressive, compressive, depressive, or impressive, because mind is a composite of emotions, dreams, thoughts, and feelings, some or most of which are repressed according to the innate disposition of the individual person and his particular circumstances at any given time.

 

23.  A person is not born to be emotional, dreamy, thoughtful, or aware in equal measure, but to develop one or another of the elemental components according to her/his predisposition.

 

24.  That is why, generally speaking, females are more emotional and dreamy than males, while males are correspondingly more thoughtful and spiritual than females.

 

25.  Attempts to squeeze everybody into a general mishmash of elemental aptitudes, on the basis of gender equality, are foredoomed to failure.

 

26.  Attempts to treat females and males as equals, whether in relation to noumenal or phenomenal criteria or, indeed, a cross between the two, flies in the face of what unnature and nature have ordained from the outset.

 

27.  For females are unnatural according to the extent, following free will, of their objectivity, whereas males are natural according to the extent, following determinism, of their subjectivity.

 

28.  One of the main reasons why females are forever resorting to cosmetics and other forms of artificial make-up ... is that they are fundamentally unnatural, and hence ranged against nature.

 

29.  Nature begins in vegetation and ends in air (supernaturally).  That, by contrast, which begins in fire and ends in water is unnatural.

 

30.  Art and literature are both unnatural art forms, which are largely conditioned (expressively and compressively) by unconscious processes.

 

31.  By contrast, sculpture and music, being natural art forms, are largely conditioned (depressively and impressively) by conscious processes.

 

32.  Like females, art and literature reflect a greater degree of free will (in objectivity) than natural determinism, since free will stems from an unnatural precondition as an expression and/or compression of unconsciousness.

 

33.  Like males, sculpture and music reflect a greater degree of natural determinism (in subjectivity) than free will, since determinism stems from a natural precondition as a depression and/or impression of consciousness.

 

34.  Of course, what I have just contended applies to each of the Arts in their per se manifestations, not necessarily to their 'bovaryized' manifestations to anything like (if at all) the same extent.

 

35.  As a writer, I have to admit that my own preferred medium, viz. aphoristic philosophy, is anything but a per se manifestation of literature but, rather, a 'bovaryization' of it that, being concerned principally with essential content, intimates, in quasi-idealistic vein, of musical idealism.

 

36.  The literary per se is, of course, drama, wherein the tongue is in its watery element in heathenistic fashion, dominating the 'vegetative' novel and consigning to peripheral status the 'fiery' poem and the 'airy' essay.

 

37.  That which is aphoristic, as here, is effectively 'beyond the pale' of the sort of heathenistic society and/or system in which tongue-based drama flourishes, being, to all intents and purposes, morally at the top of a literary hierarchy in which both fiction and drama have subordinate places in relation to vegetative and watery modes of literary sensibility.

 

38.  In general terms, that which is rooted in sensuality is Protestant and, hence, at best pseudo-Christian, whereas that which is centred in sensibility is Catholic, and hence properly Christian.

 

 

CYCLE SEVEN

 

1.   To contrast the expression of emotion through perceptions with the reception of impressions through awareness, as one would contrast fire with air, or metachemical devility with metaphysical divinity.

 

2.   To contrast the compression of instinct through deceptions with the conception of depressions through intellect, as one would contrast water with vegetation, or chemical femininity with physical masculinity.

 

3.   Females flatter to deceive, falling back from chemical femininity to metachemical devility, wherein emotional expression has its perceptual throne.

 

4.   Males flatter to conceive, rising up from physical masculinity to metaphysical divinity, wherein spiritual impression has its receptual throne.

 

5.   People are, to a large extent, reflections of the type of society and/or system in which they live, which conditions their psychology accordingly.

 

6.   British and, in particular, English psychology is significantly conditioned by the heathenistic criteria which accrue to the retention of a system in which water and fire exist above vegetation in what amounts to an inverted triangular structure whose dominating elements are female.

 

7.   It is for this reason that the generality of Englishmen, superficially identified with vegetation 'down below' at the base of the inverted triangle, are especially vulnerable to denigratory abuse from females, whose watery and fiery bias 'rides high', in heathenistic freedom, at their expense.

 

8.   It is hard to imagine males being held in such contempt in Catholic countries, but in Britain males are very much under a denigratory cosh from females who, instead of being 'pegged down' to feminine sensibility, are granted too much freedom, in due heathenistic fashion, and express it in no uncertain terms.

 

9.   Freedom is really the heathenistic battle-cry of female-dominated societies, since females have most to gain from it and males most to lose, as the degree to which they are held in contempt by 'free women' should adequately confirm.

 

10.  As victims of crude denigration, males naturally feel a strong resentment towards females in countries like Britain, and will more easily resort to anti-feminine expletives in consequence of their hurt.

 

11.  Romance or romanticism is virtually impossible in a heathenistic or protestant society, because masculine resentment against denigratory abuse from females is so strong, that the emotional positivity necessary to any romantic attitude towards women is demonstrably lacking, in consequence of which males enter into negative or unloving relationships with females that are characteristic of promiscuity or 'free love' or 'one-night stands'.

 

12.  The importance attached to contraception in Britain is significant of the extent to which relationships remain heathenistically aloof from sensibility in deference to Protestant-dominated criteria having more to do with sensuality.

 

13.  Catholic males are less likely to be resentfully disdainful of (catholic) females in view of the extent to which the latter are 'pegged down' to a pseudo-Heathen/quasi-Christian deference to men through Marianism, and are therefore less likely to be denigratory towards them than their Protestant counterparts.

 

14.  In fact, the usual anti-male denigration of 'shit' would be irrelevant to the Catholic male, since cerebral vegetation rises above uterine water as intellectual sensibility above instinctual sensibility, and one is less likely, as a woman, to denigrate that which is effectively 'above one', in Christian vein, as 'bullshit', than to denigrate that which is effectively 'beneath one', in heathenistic fashion, as 'cowshit'.

 

15.  Conversely, one is less likely, as a male, to resentfully denounce women when they are effectively 'beneath one', in quasi-Christian vein, as 'bullpiss', than when they are effectively 'above one', in heathenistic fashion, as either 'cowpiss' or 'cowpuss' (though the latter will more usually be directed against the Catholic or, at any rate, Celtic threat of 'bullgas' rather than at Anglican pseudo-Christians, since its correspondence is rather more subfeminine, and hence antispiritual, than feminine, and hence anti-intellectual, so that anything recognizably supermasculine will be perceived as a potential threat to its power-base in the inverted triangle).

 

16.  Be that as it may, few Protestant or British women will bother to make the distinction, noted above, between 'cowshit' and 'bullshit', but will simply denigrate men in terms of 'shit', which is effectively to lump them all together, in protestant fashion, as 'cowshit'.

 

17.  Yet one can only be denigratory from a heathenistic vantage-point in 'cowpiss' towards what is perceived, rightly or wrongly, as being vulnerable to such abuse, which obviously excludes the more vegetative masculinity of that which, corresponding to 'bullshit', lies beyond the Protestant's triangular pale, in what amounts to a sensible elevation over the sensible mode of femininity.

 

18.  One cannot be denigratory, in such anti-masculine fashion, to Catholic males, although the Irish Catholic male unfortunate enough to live in England may well be subject to heathenistic abuse the same as any other male, and have to live with the unenviable consequences, including a diminution of romanticism vis--vis the opposite sex.

 

19.  In Ireland, on the other hand, one could be forgiven for imagining the contrary, since quasi-Christian deference by women towards the properly Christian male will make for a healthier overall situation, in which there may well be more mutual admiration and respect than would otherwise be possible.

 

20.  But in England, by contrast, the Anglo-Catholic or pseudo-Christian 'fall guy' will continue to be the butt of female denigration in the manner described, and his attitude towards the generality of women will reflect his grievance in relation to the heathenistic system that, through Protestantism-proper, viz. Puritanism in water and Dissenterism in fire, grants the female the sort of antichristic and/or antispiritual elevation over the male which makes for such an unhappy psychology, a psychology, alas, which is so pervasive, in latter-day England, that one begins to expect the worst every time one comes into public contact with both men and women alike, the one given to 'cunt' and the other to 'shit' in what amounts to a vicious circle of denigratory cynicism.

 

21.  Frankly, people are conditioned by the system in which they live, and if the system is bad and heathenistic to begin with, then one can't very well expect the majority of people to be much better.  Their negative psychology can only be ended with the dawn of a new system, one necessarily more sensible in structure.

 

 

CYCLE EIGHT

 

1.   Someone told, in heathenistic fashion, to 'fuck off' is the subject of an anti-masculine form of sexist abuse whose origins can only be feminine and thus affiliated, amongst other things, to Protestant nonconformism, particularly, I would argue, with regard to the watery realm of Puritanism.

 

2.   Conversely, someone told to 'sod off' and/or 'piss off' is the subject of an anti-feminine form of sexist abuse whose origins can only be masculine and thus affiliated, willy-nilly, to the vegetative realm of Anglicanism.

 

3.   The sort of person who gets 'pissed off' about something is quite the reverse of one whose preferred term of reference is 'browned off'.  The former is likely to be Anglican and the latter Puritan, since we are dealing with masculine and feminine, vegetative and watery, alternatives in regard to 'shit' and 'piss'.

 

4.   It is highly unusual for people to verbally denigrate one another in terms of 'jerk off' and 'snog off', since such terms of abuse would not easily fit into the sort of phenomenal framework which characterizes Western and, in particular, Protestant civilization, being, if anything, too noumenal for people who only have a tangential relationship, as a rule, with fire and air.

 

5.   Yet if such verbal denigrations as 'jerk off' and 'snog off' are far less characteristic of lower-class heathenistic mentalities than derogatory recourse to admonitions like 'fuck off' and 'sod off' and/or 'piss off', it cannot be said that the use of denigratory terms like 'jerk' and/or 'wanker' on the one hand, and 'bum' and/or 'tramp' on the other is unheard of, particularly, I would argue, in connection with a sort of mini-transcendentalist/fundamentalist rivalry between Catholic and Protestant extremists.

 

6.   Be that as it may, most if not all terms of abuse, whether verbally intended or otherwise, are traceable to the heathenistic antagonisms which, in time-honoured Protestant fashion, pit women against men and men against women ... to the detriment, especially, of men, many of whom will be 'bent' away from their masculine gender to a degree which makes them less pseudo-masculine, in Anglicanism, than quasi-feminine/subfeminine and, hence, either Puritanical or Dissenteresque.

 

7.   The man who is 'shit' to the heathenistic woman and/or 'bent man' may well be disposed to regard his denigrator as someone who, exposing herself as a 'cunt' and/or 'sod', ought to 'piss off'.

 

8.   Conversely, the woman and/or 'bent man' who is a 'cunt' to the pseudo-Christian male will be disposed to regarding her detractor as someone who, exposing himself as a 'prick', ought to 'fuck off'.

 

9.   In neither case is there any mutual admiration or respect, but only a belittling of the opposite sex or of those who, being recognizably 'bent', have 'sold out' to the opposite sex for apparent gain or are otherwise identifiable with it because of their ethnic disposition, etc.

 

10.  Even the pseudo-masculine male may well be jealous of the more genuinely masculine male and be disposed, in consequence, to disparage him as a 'nut' or a 'bum', since pseudo-masculinity relates less to 'bullshit' than to 'cowshit', and cannot allow itself to identify with a Roman Catholic position in consequence of the degree to which it is beholden, in pseudo-Christian fashion, to the hegemony of heathenism, obliged to take whatever 'cowpiss' and/or 'cowpuss' the latter decides to inflict upon it in the interests of so-called Protestant solidarity.

 

11.  Such 'solidarity' really amounts to little more than a mutually disrespectful society governed by heathen tensions which constantly war on one another, even as their perpetrators turn against outsiders with a view to disparaging them for being different, e.g. Christian.

 

12.  It is doubtful that 'outsiders' could be included in such a society and/or system, since the inverted triangle is exclusive of anything Christian, which, in any case, would be incompatible with it.

 

13.  Only the democratic dismantling of such an exclusive system could free the majority of its victims for inclusion within a better system, one necessarily non-triangular in structure.  But such an inclusion cannot come about vis--vis Catholic alternatives to the Protestant system, since Catholicism by itself would not amount to anything new, least of all in Ireland where, in any case, it tends to assume a Marian bias on account of its association with Romanism.

 

14.  What is needed is a sort of Superchristian New Order, in which there will be neither Catholics nor Protestants but only Social Transcendentalists, or people, in other words, who relate to the Centre, the concept and, one day hopefully context, of religious sovereignty for those who democratically opt for it if and when the opportunity finally comes to pass.

 

 

CYCLE NINE

 

1.   The Superchristian New Order referred to above would be beyond anything Christian, including Orthodox and Celtic alternatives to the Roman Catholic mode of Christianity that typifies official Ireland.  It would amount to a non-triangular triadic structure in which there were three approaches to Social Transcendentalism, viz. a watery approach of the New Purgatory, a vegetative approach of the New Earth, and an airy approach of the New Heaven.

 

2.   One could argue, in very general terms, that the watery approach of the New Purgatory amounted to a sort of Super-romanism; that the vegetative approach of the New Earth amounted to a sort of Super-orthodoxy (Russian); and that the airy approach of the New Heaven amounted to a sort of Super-radicalism.  For the triadic structure of the Social Transcendentalist Beyond would be more than just a new Romanism, since traditionally this mode of Catholicism tends to reflect a Marian and, thus, watery bias, in keeping with its Italian origins (whilst also deferring, to some extent, to the rainy climate of Ireland).

 

3.   Because Social Transcendentalism is syncretic, it should provide adequate watery sensibility for those who, as Puritans, had been more partial to watery sensuality, viz. to the tongue than to the womb, and therefore would profit from a sensible alternative to their heathenistic traditions, such as the bottom tier of our projected triadic Beyond should reflect in pseudo-humanistic/quasi-nonconformist terms.

 

4.   Likewise, the syncretism of Social Transcendentalism should provide adequate vegetative sensibility for those who, as Anglicans, had been more partial to vegetative sensuality, viz. to the phallus than to the brain, and therefore would profit from a sensible alternative to their pseudo-Christian traditions, such as the second tier of our projected triadic Beyond should reflect in super-nonconformist terms.

 

5.   Finally, because of the syncretic nature of Social Transcendentalism, there should be adequate provision of airy sensibility for those who, as Catholics, had been more partial to airy sensuality, viz. to the ears than to the lungs, and therefore would profit from a sensible alternative to their sub-transcendental traditions, such that the third (and highest) tier of our projected triadic Beyond should reflect in super-transcendental terms.

 

6.   Of course, I am assuming that most Irish Catholic males are effectively, if not literally, more partial to Celtic Church airiness than to Roman Catholic wateriness, in keeping with the Celtic bias towards idealism.  Marianism may have officially prevailed, but the best examples of Gaelic culture reflect, I have argued, a more Celtic disposition that transcends the Italianate parameters of the Roman Catholic Church - as, for example, with regard to Camogie, Gaelic Football, and Hurling, the latter of which, being more idealistic, is unquestionably the highest.

 

7.   But it is a highness that could be identified, through cultural extrapolation, with a subsection of Celtic-Church Radicalism, not to a Celtic Church top tier of a Christian triad having both (Russian) Orthodoxy and Romanism beneath it.  For, in actuality, Camogie, Gaelic Football, and Hurling approximate to a single tier of sporting commitment that is subsectioned between quasi-humanist (Camogie), quasi-nonconformist (Gaelic), and sub-transcendental (Hurling) options, thereby broadly falling within Celtic Church parameters.

 

8.   Such an idealistic integrity could just as easily fit into the Social Transcendentalist top tier of our projected triadic Beyond, except that, being super-transcendental, it would require indoor transmutations of each game, in keeping with its sensible bias.

 

9.   Likewise, Association Football could be transmuted upwards, as Anglicans opted for the sensible alternative to the flesh, thereby passing to the second tier of our projected triadic Beyond, while, down below in the first or bottom tier, an indoor transmutation of Rugby Union and/or League would allow Puritans to accommodate themselves to Social Transcendentalism on necessarily sensible terms having more to do with water than with either vegetation (second tier) or air (top tier).

 

10.  Thus the triadic Beyond would not be a structure extrapolated out from Celtic Catholicism, in which indoor versions of Camogie, Gaelic Football, and Hurling were the sole sporting commitments, but a structure that also allowed for transmutations of Association Football and Rugby Union and/or League, in keeping with its broadly-based extrapolation from Christian and, indeed, pseudo-Christian and even heathenistic precedence.

 

11.  Social Transcendentalism is not Roman Catholicism or any other mode of Catholicism in a new and more radical guise.  It is a syncretic religion that draws from a variety of traditions and seeks not only to transmute them but to transcend them as the People are democratically led to transcendentalism through the assumption of religious sovereignty and thereby rendered deferential, either directly (above) or indirectly (below), to the leadership of what is properly divine.

 

12.  At the end of the day, there will be not just a New Heaven of supermasculine idealists, but a New Earth and a New Purgatory for the more pervasively masculine and feminine elements below, each of whom will likewise have subsections relative to their respective tiers which should allow, in addition to the representative subsection, for 'quasi' manifestations of the prevailing bias of each of the other tiers, thereby enabling at least some form of transcendentalism, nonconformism, and humanism to co-exist on any tier, irrespective of the presiding element.

 

13.  In such fashion, no tier will be deprived of anything, and every tier will have some idea of what characterizes the principal religious commitments of those tiers either above (if applicable) or beneath (if applicable) their own.

 

14.  Movement from one subsection to another, and even from one tier to another, might also, in the course of time, prove possible, subject, however, to mutual approval between the person seeking to move and the subsection and/or tier to which he/she seeks admittance.  There may also, in exceptional cases, be the possibility of having to move from one subsection to another, or even from one tier to another, due to misconduct or because of ethnic unsuitability.

 

15.  It is to be assumed, however, that, to begin with and for the foreseeable future, the bottom tier would be peopled by persons of Puritan background, the middle tier by persons of Anglican background, and the top tier by persons of Catholic background (including Roman Catholic as well as Celtic Church).  Other denominations and/or religious traditions would likewise have to be ascribed a tier according to suitability and/or availability.

 

16.  Frankly, all people are a mixture, in one degree or another, of sensuality and sensibility, since one cannot have sensuality without sensibility, or vice versa.  Some persons are more sensual than others in one way or another, and other persons more sensible than others in one way or another, but no-one, not even these days, would be entirely sensual or sensible.

 

17.  To some extent, the ratio of sensuality to sensibility or of sensibility to sensuality is a personal thing, having to do with ancestry, gender, upbringing, intelligence, and so on, but there is also an extent to which impersonal factors like climate and environment play a significant role in determining the relationship of the one to the other.

 

18.  I can conceive, broadly, of a paganistic external, or outdoor, age being one in which the ratio of sensuality to sensibility favours (in 'once-born' terms) sensuality by at least 3:1, while the subsequent ensuing of a Christian dualistic age, balanced between external and internal, would suggest the likelihood of sensuality and sensibility and/or sensibility and sensuality squaring up at 2:2.  Finally, it seems to me that the supersession of such a dualistic age by a transcendental internal, or indoor, age would alter the ratio of sensuality to sensibility or, rather, of sensibility to sensuality (in fully 're-born' terms) to one of 3:1, so that we had a situation the reverse of the pagan age of predominant externality.

 

19.  In such a transcendental age, one could expect more sensibility than sensuality, since it would be reflective of the interiorization of civilization and signify the culmination-point of human evolution, a culmination that could only portend further modification of the ratio (though not its elimination), as post-human criteria came increasingly to the fore in the course of 'millennial' progress.

 

 

CYCLE TEN

 

1.   So long as sensuality predominates over sensibility, life will be dominated, in 'once-born' terms, by female criteria.  Only the preponderance of sensibility over sensuality can make for a situation in which male criteria are hegemonic in due 're-born' terms.

 

2.   The female is, by and large, more impersonal than personal in her overall stance before life, since she is characterized by objective tendencies to a greater extent than by subjective ones, and the objective favours the impersonal to a greater extent than the personal, albeit the latter still applies.

 

3.   Climatic and environmental criteria, being fundamentally impersonal, are generally closer to the female aspect of life than to the male one, and it is for this reason that they tie-in with biological conditioning as a contributory factor to free will as opposed to natural determinism.

 

4.   Urban societies are more the product of free will than of natural determinism, since they are characterized by impersonal factors to a greater extent than by personal ones, in view of their fundamentally objective character.

 

5.   The female side of life is viciously competitive in the individualism of noumenal objectivity but virtuously competitive in the individualism of phenomenal objectivity, the former having a sartorial correlation with dresses and the latter with skirts.

 

6.   The male side of life is viciously co-operative in the collectivism of phenomenal subjectivity but virtuously co-operative in the collectivism of noumenal subjectivity, the former having a sartorial correlation with trousers and the latter with zippersuits.

 

7.   Universities, being impersonal institutions, are rooted in the individualism of noumenal objectivity, and are thus fundamentally viciously competitive.

 

8.   Universities have more in common, at bottom, with the cosmic Universe than ever they do with karmic universalism, and are thus fundamentally evil (metachemical).

 

9.   Many of the 'best minds' do not go to university, will not have a degree or a doctorate, and have never worn, nor are ever likely to wear, a 'cap and gown'.

 

10.  A person who was highly literate would be unlikely also to consider himself highly numerate, since the one tends to marginalize the other, as, to all intents and purposes, do God and the Devil.

 

11.  Numbers, being objectively impersonal, have more in common with magic than ever they do with mysticism.  In fact, numbers are the chief tools of science, the means whereby it strives to comprehend and dominate matter.

 

12.  That which, as religion, strives to liberate from matter ... uses words rather than numbers as its principal vehicle for the attainment of enlightenment, which, as holy persons will know, transcends even 'the word'.

 

13.  Numbers end in the feminine, whereas words begin in the masculine, having their foundations, so to speak, in vegetative subjectivity.

 

14.  That which is beyond evil and good is also, in some sense, beyond numbers, since numbers would tie one to the Devil ... of noumenal objectivity, and thus preclude one's liberation from matter to spirit.

 

15.  When religion is pseudo and thus occult, based in ocular culture, it relies heavily on numbers, availing of them to bewitch and enslave the morally ignorant in the interests of hegemonic materialism.

 

16.  A person who prides himself on being highly numerate could never be highly moral, much less highly literate.  Rather, he is likely to be one who takes the Devil's dominion for granted, his soul aflame with fiery evil.

 

17.  Evil is only in its per se, or most authentic, manifestation in cruelty, which is unequivocally fiery.  In perversity it is quasi-watery, and hence 'once bovaryized'; in obscenity it is quasi-vegetative, and hence 'twice bovaryized'; and in depravity it is quasi-airy, and hence 'thrice bovaryized'.

 

18.  Therefore evil is only in its per se manifestation scientifically, in science; for where its political, economic, and religious 'bovaryizations' are concerned, it is less purely evil in proportion as its fieriness is compromised by atomic subdivisions having a structural correlation with water, vegetation, and air, albeit from a necessarily fiery point of view.

 

19.  Hence molecular-particle, molecular-wavicle, and elemental-wavicle 'bovaryizations', respectively, of what, in its per se manifestation, will have an elemental-particle structural integrity in which the metachemical element of the photon and/or photino of space-time objectivity reflects a condition of most particle/least wavicle in due scientific fashion.

 

20.  Whatever the prevailing pattern of metachemical aspiration, the only result is to affirm the Devil's science, politics, economics, and religion, the latter of which, relying heavily on numbers, will be occult, and the object, in consequence, of depravity.

 

21.  Where genuine or, at any rate, non-occult religion is concerned, it is better that the Devil's art form, viz. painting, should be 'taken over' and rendered accountable to a morally spiritual directive ... than be left to its own devices in unequivocally pagan terms, since that which one cannot get rid of must be bent to the service of truth, God, Heaven, etc., as a point of principle.

 

22.  With the decline of religious control of art, following the decline of the religion which controlled it, it is inevitable that art will cease being the 'handmaiden of religion' and revert, instead, to itself, which is to say, to serving the Devil rather than God (no matter how paradoxically) in what amounts to a paganistic affirmation of fiery freedom in due noumenally objective fashion.

 

23.  From having been bent away from its fiery appearance even to a depiction, necessarily symbolical, of airy essence, art, released from religious control, reverts to a condition of paganistic freedom which is commensurate with 'art-for-art's-sake' and an affirmation, in consequence, of the Devil's superfeminine, and hence super-unnatural/ super-unconscious, rule.

 

24.  This process attains to a veritable apotheosis with so-called abstract art, the pure materialism of which takes painting to the borders of the contemporary context of light art, whereby the Devil achieves a truly modern rather than simply decadent (in relation to painterly tradition) presentation, commensurate with an unequivocal expression of noumenal objectivity in the freest possible form of cultural barbarism.

 

 

CYCLE ELEVEN

 

1.   One should distinguish the cultural barbarity of art (including painting) from the cultural civility of literature, and each of these female art forms from the natural culture of sculpture and the cultural (or subnatural-to-supernatural) culture of music, both of which are comparatively male art forms, or art forms the overall integrity of which is rather more subjective than objective.

 

2.   Art, literature, sculpture, and music, corresponding in elemental terms to fire, water, vegetation, and air, stand in a shadowy relationship to science, politics, economics, and religion, since, although a correlation indubitably exists, it is rather one between premise and conclusion, precondition and resolution.

 

3.   In fact, it is safe to say that without art, there would be no science, without literature no politics, without sculpture no economics, and without music no religion.

 

4.   A barbarous people, dominated by fire, will be scientific; a civilized people, governed by water, will be political; a natural people, represented by vegetation, will be economic; and a cultural people, led by air, will be religious.

 

5.   Art will especially flourish under barbarism, literature under civilization, sculpture under nature, and music under culture.

 

6.   Art uses barbarous means (paint) to illustrate science, literature uses civilized means (ink) to illustrate politics, sculpture uses natural means (clay) to illustrate economics, and music uses cultural means (notes) to illustrate religion.

 

7.   Science is always beyond art, just as politics is always beyond literature, economics always beyond sculpture, and religion always beyond music.

 

8.   One can exemplify fire through art, but only science can amplify it, using the diabolic element par excellence directly.

 

9.   Likewise, one can exemplify water through literature, but only politics can amplify it, using the feminine element par excellence directly.

 

10.  Similarly, one can exemplify vegetation through sculpture, but only economics can amplify it, using the masculine element par excellence directly.

 

11.  Finally, one can exemplify air through music, but only religion can amplify it, using the divine element par excellence directly.

 

12.  The positive exemplification of fire through art is called beauty, and beauty is an apparent shortfall from love.

 

13.  The positive exemplification of water through literature is called strength, and strength is a quantitative shortfall from pride.

 

14.  The positive exemplification of vegetation through sculpture is called knowledge, and knowledge is a quantitative shortfall from pleasure.

 

15.  The positive exemplification of air through music is called truth, and truth is an apparent shortfall from joy.

 

16.  Art may serve, when positive, to exemplify beauty, but only science can serve to amplify love, its essential resolution.

 

17.  Literature may serve, when positive, to exemplify strength, but only politics can serve to amplify pride, its qualitative resolution.

 

18.  Sculpture may serve, when positive, to exemplify knowledge, but only economics can serve to amplify pleasure, its qualitative resolution.

 

19.  Music may serve, when positive, to exemplify truth, but only religion can serve to amplify joy, its essential resolution.

 

20.  The relationship of art, literature, sculpture, and music to their respective elements is accordingly indirect, whereas the relationship of science, politics, economics, and religion to their respective elements is direct.

 

21.  The 'cultural' disciplines utilize fire, water, vegetation, and air indirectly, through their various media of presentation, whereas the 'natural' disciplines utilize these same elements directly - to greater effect.

 

22.  The 'cultural' disciplines exemplify the particle aspect of any given subatomic element, whereas the 'natural' disciplines tend to amplify its wavicle aspect.

 

23.  Hence although the utilization of fire is barbarous in both art (paint) and science (Bunsen burner, etc.), it is indirectly barbarous in the one case and directly so in the other.

 

24.  Although the utilization of water is civilized in both literature (ink) and politics (speech), it is indirectly civilized in the one case and directly so in the other.

 

25.  Although the utilization of vegetation is natural in both sculpture (clay) and economics (produce), it is indirectly natural in the one case and directly so in the other.

 

26.  Although the utilization of air is cultural in both music (notation) and religion (meditation), it is indirectly cultural in the one case and directly so in the other.

 

27.  Art, in the broadest sense, can never be a substitute for life, but only a guide to living it more fully.

 

28.  Neither, on account of its illustrative nature, is art an obstacle to life but, rather, a 'cultural' precondition, in disciplinary vein, of that fuller commitment to life which, being equally if not more disciplined, is commensurate with civilization in the broadest possible sense, a sense antithetical to or, at any rate, distinct from savagery.

 

 

CYCLE TWELVE

 

1.   The Arts, considered together, are important, but they are not all-important, and should not be regarded or treated as an end-in-itself.

 

2.   Unfortunately, in the West (and England in particular), it is all-too-easy, under materialistic pressures, to exaggerate the importance of one or another of the Arts, in view of the female bias that both historically and contemporaneously tends to result in the predominance of particles over wavicles, whether in sensuality or in sensibility or, indeed, a paradoxical combination of both.

 

3.   Small wonder if, with the decline of traditional faith, this process has been taken to a point where only the particle, or apparent/quantitative side of things, counts for anything, as the qualitative/essential side, corresponding to the wavicle, is squeezed out.

 

4.   But illustration is of little value without something to illustrate, something more than the tools of illustration itself, and the Arts become less meaningful in proportion to the degree of estrangement from that which they were intended to serve, be it science, politics, economics, or religion.

 

5.   Ultimately, no art form can survive for long without a correlative discipline to illustrate.  Nor, by a converse token, can the absence or withdrawal of art from those disciplines which directly avail of fire, water, vegetation, and air be particularly beneficial to them.

 

6.   Science, politics, economics, and religion cannot exist within a vacuum, but require a certain degree of illustrative exemplification if they are to be both fully intelligible and broadly accessible to society in general.

 

7.   Such exemplification will, in a sensibly-run subjectively-biased society, underline rather than threaten the significance of each of the direct disciplines, since, depending on the bias of the particular civilization, it is science, politics, economics, or religion which should take precedence in the conduct of that civilization's internal affairs.

 

8.   If this has not always been the case in the West, it has more usually been so in the East, particularly with regard to religion traditionally, but also with regard to economics and politics in no small measure.

 

9.   For it is easier in a male-biased, subjective society to grant precedence to cultural amplification than to cultural exemplification, and the result will be far more conducive to experience of the wavicle side of life than to endurance of its particle side.

 

10.  Whether the West can ever become the East or vice versa, is a moot point.  Fundamentally, the world is divisible, in elemental terms, not only between East and West but also, if less characteristically these days, between North and South, and it must remain doubtful that regional differences could ever be entirely overcome, even with recourse to a growing assembly of technological stratagems aimed effectively, if not specifically, at a more homogeneous end.

 

11.  But a hierarchy of moral priorities, based on sound logical procedures, is possible, at least theoretically, and there is no reason to suppose that some practical accommodation of it would be impossible to sustain on a global basis.

 

12.  The West may not be the East, but the world is becoming an increasingly smaller place in which interaction between its various hemispheres is slowly ironing out age-old differences, and bringing peoples closer together on more than simply physical terms.

 

13.  In another hundred years, this process will be so much more advanced ... that what was thought impossible will no longer be so, as the West and the East gradually blend into one vast civilization that, coupled to the North and the South, will be able to respect, if with differing emphases, the same philosophy and even religion.

 

14.  For, ultimately, there can be only one philosophy, one cultural illustration of it, and, more importantly, one religion, since truth is not beauty, strength, or knowledge, even if beautiful, strong, and knowledgeable manifestations of truth will co-exist, in one form or another, with true truth, the pure truth that affirms, through transcendental meditation, the inner metaphysical will as the means whereby the inner metaphysical self may achieve union with the inner metaphysical spirit and become not merely pure, but joyfully universalized through superconscious transcendence.

 

 

CYCLE THIRTEEN

 

1.   Since I have been discussing the Arts quite a lot in this text, and since the above references to art, literature, sculpture, and music are intended to apply primarily to their per se manifestations, I should now like to qualify that undertaking in relation to each art form treated separately, beginning with art itself.

 

2.   Thus I intend to divide art, conceived in more or less traditional terms, into oil painting, water colouring, pastel shading, and charcoal drawing, maintaining not only, as before, that an elemental correlation exists between art and fire, but that oil painting, approximating to fiery fire, is the per se of art, and hence that branch of it which most corresponds to science.

 

3.   Following which, we may conceive of water colouring as approximating to watery fire in what amounts to a quasi-political mode of art, pastel shading as approximating to vegetative fire in what amounts to a quasi-economic mode of art, and charcoal drawing as approximating to airy fire in what amounts to a quasi-religious mode of art.

 

4.   Hence art provides us, in these four fiery options, with distinctions between a metachemical per se, corresponding to oil painting, and three degrees of metachemical 'bovaryization', from water colouring and pastel shading to charcoal drawing.

 

5.   The metachemical per se of art (oil painting) corresponds to scientific science, the quasi-chemical 'bovaryization' of art (water colouring) corresponds to political science, the quasi-physical 'bovaryization' of art (pastel shading) corresponds to economic science, and the quasi-metaphysical 'bovaryization' of art (charcoal drawing) corresponds to religious science.

 

6.   In all four cases cited above, we are concerned with a fiery, and hence fundamentally barbarous, approach to 'cultural' illustration which, being scientific, has a space-time correlation in keeping with its metachemical basis, through photon-photino appearances, in noumenal objectivity.

 

7.   Likewise, literature can be divided into poetry, drama, fiction, and philosophy, and it is my contention that not only does an elemental correlation exist between literature and water, but that drama, corresponding to watery water (speech) is the per se of literature, and hence that branch of it which most corresponds to politics.

 

8.   Following which, we may conceive of poetry as approximating to fiery water in what amounts to a quasi-scientific mode of literature, philosophy as approximating to airy water in what amounts to a quasi-religious mode of literature, and fiction as approximating to vegetative water in what amounts to a quasi-economic mode of literature.

 

9.   Hence literature provides us, in these four watery options, with distinctions between a chemical per se, corresponding to drama, and three kinds of chemical 'bovaryization', from poetry and philosophy to fiction.

 

10.  The chemical per se of literature (drama) corresponds to political politics, the quasi-metachemical 'bovaryization' of literature (poetry) corresponds to scientific politics, the quasi-metaphysical 'bovaryization' of literature (philosophy) corresponds to religious politics, and the quasi-physical 'bovaryization' of literature (fiction) corresponds to economic politics.

 

11.  In all four cases cited above, we are concerned with a watery, and hence fundamentally civilized, approach to 'cultural' illustration which, being political, has a volume-mass correlation in keeping with its chemical basis, through electron-electrino (conventional) and/or positron-positrino (radical) quantities, in phenomenal objectivity.

 

12.  Similarly, sculpture can be divided into reliefs, busts, figures, and carvings, and it is my contention that not only does an elemental correlation exist between sculpture and vegetation (earth), but that the figurative, approximating to vegetative vegetation, is the per se of sculpture, and hence that branch of it which most corresponds to economics.

 

13.  Following which, we may conceive of carvings as approximating to airy vegetation in what amounts to a quasi-religious mode of sculpture, reliefs as approximating to fiery vegetation in what amounts to a quasi-scientific mode of sculpture, and busts as approximating to watery vegetation in what amounts to a quasi-political mode of sculpture.

 

14.  Hence sculpture provides us, in these four vegetative options, with distinctions between a physical per se, corresponding to the figurative, and three kinds of physical 'bovaryization', from carvings and reliefs to busts.

 

15.  The physical per se of sculpture (figurative) corresponds to economic economics, the quasi-metaphysical 'bovaryization' of sculpture (carvings) corresponds to religious economics, the quasi-metachemical 'bovaryization' of sculpture (reliefs) corresponds to scientific economics, and the quasi-chemical 'bovaryization' of sculpture (busts) corresponds to political economics.

 

16.  In all four cases cited above, we are concerned with a vegetative, and hence fundamentally natural, approach to 'cultural' illustration which, being economic, has a mass-volume correlation in keeping with its physical basis, through neutron-neutrino (conventional) and/or deuteron-deuterino (radical) qualities, in phenomenal subjectivity.

 

17.  Finally, music can be divided into dance (rhythm), vocal (melody), instrumental (harmony), and solo (pitch), and it is my contention that not only does an elemental correlation exist between music and air, but that pitchful solo, corresponding to airy air, is the per se of music, and hence that branch of it which most corresponds to religion.

 

18.  Following which, we may conceive of harmonic instrumental as approximating to vegetative air in what amounts to a quasi-economic mode of music, melodic vocal as approximating to watery air in what amounts to a quasi-political mode of music, and rhythmic dance as approximating to fiery air in what amounts to a quasi-scientific mode of music.

 

19.  Hence music provides us, in these four airy options, with distinctions between a metaphysical per se, corresponding to pitchful solo, and three degrees of metaphysical 'bovaryization', from harmonic instrumental and melodic vocal to rhythmic dance.

 

20.  The metaphysical per se of music (pitchful solo) corresponds to religious religion, the quasi-physical 'bovaryization' of music (harmonic instrumental) corresponds to economic religion, the quasi-chemical 'bovaryization' of music (melodic vocal) corresponds to political religion, and the quasi-metachemical 'bovaryization' of music (rhythmic dance) corresponds to scientific religion.

 

21.  In all four cases cited above, we are concerned with an airy, and hence fundamentally cultural, approach to 'cultural' illustration which, being religious, has a time-space correlation in keeping with its metaphysical basis, through proton-protino essences, in noumenal subjectivity.

 

 

CYCLE FOURTEEN

 

1.   The noumenal objectivity of space-time metachemistry contrasts with the noumenal subjectivity of time-space metaphysics ... as fire with air, or appearance with essence, or doing (acting) with being, or the Devil/Hell with God/Heaven.

 

2.   The phenomenal objectivity of volume-mass chemistry contrasts with the phenomenal subjectivity of mass-volume physics ... as water with vegetation, or quantity with quality, or giving with taking, or woman/purgatory with man/earth.

 

3.   Just as one achieves maximum action in connection with fiery appearances, so the achievement of maximum being is only possible in relation to airy essences.

 

4.   Just as one achieves maximum giving in connection with watery quantities, so the achievement of maximum taking is only possible in relation to vegetative qualities.

 

5.   The metachemical nature or, rather, unnature of doing contrasts absolutely, within noumenal parameters, with the metaphysical nature of being, as science with religion.

 

6.   The chemical nature or, rather, unnature of giving contrasts relatively, within phenomenal parameters, with the physical nature of taking, as politics with economics.

 

7.   Both doing and giving, having objective dispositions, exist on the female side of life as primary tendencies.

 

8.   Both taking and being, having subjective dispositions, exist on the male side of life as secondary tendencies.

 

9.   As a rule, women give to do, falling back, through phenomenal objectivity, upon fiery appearances, which is their noumenal foundation.

 

10.  As a rule, men take to be, rising up, through phenomenal subjectivity, upon airy essences, which is their noumenal resolution.

 

11.  Both doing and being are high in relation to giving and taking, since their elemental correspondence to fire and air makes them noumenal, as on the planes of Space and Time.

 

12.  Both giving and taking are low in relation to doing and being, since their elemental correspondence to water and vegetation makes them phenomenal, as on the planes of Volume and Mass.

 

13.  That which, having a noumenal correlation, is high ... can be high either in relation to the Devil/Hell or to God/Heaven, which is to say, in terms of either metachemical appearances or metaphysical essences, fire or air.

 

14.  That which, having a phenomenal correlation, is low ... can be low either in relation to woman/purgatory or to man/earth, which is to say, in terms of either chemical quantities or physical qualities, water or vegetation.

 

15.  Highness proceeds metachemically, through noumenal objectivity, in relation to doing, and metaphysically, through noumenal subjectivity, in relation to being.

 

16.  Lowness proceeds chemically, through phenomenal objectivity, in relation to giving, and physically, through phenomenal subjectivity, in relation to taking.

 

17.  There is the metachemical highness, through space-time materialism (fire), of ugliness/hatred and beauty/love in both external (spatial space) and internal (repetitive time) contexts.

 

18.  There is the metaphysical highness, through time-space idealism (air), of falsity/woe and truth/joy in both external (sequential time) and internal (spaced space) contexts.

 

19.  There is the chemical lowness, through volume-mass realism (water), of weakness/humility and strength/pride in both external (volumetric volume) and internal (massed mass) contexts.

 

20.  There is the physical lowness, through mass-volume naturalism (vegetation), of ignorance/pain and knowledge/pleasure in both external (massive mass) and internal (voluminous volume) contexts.

 

21.  Metachemical highness, having diabolic associations through fiery appearances, is the highness of doing (acting), in which art and science express their rule.

 

22.  Metaphysical highness, having divine associations through airy essences, is the highness of being (experiencing), in which music and religion impress their leadership.

 

23.  Chemical lowness, having feminine associations through watery quantities, is the lowness of giving (sacrificing), in which literature and politics compress their governance. 

 

 

24.  Physical lowness, having masculine associations through vegetative qualities, is the lowness of taking (receiving), in which sculpture and economics depress their representativeness.

 

25.  The chemical falls back on the metachemical, as woman on the Devil, just as, conversely, the physical rises up towards the metaphysical, as man towards God.

 

26.  Hence, in disciplinary terms, there is a gender-conditioned tendency for literature to fall back on art, and for politics to fall back on science.

 

27.  Likewise, there is a gender-conditioned tendency, in disciplinary terms, for sculpture to rise up towards music, and for economics to rise up towards religion.

 

28.  That which falls back on the Devil/Hell cannot be expected to reach an accommodation with God/Heaven ... except to the limited extent that it is inhibited from falling back on the Devil/Hell and simultaneously rendered indirectly deferential, from an inferior position, to God/Heaven.

 

29.  As I have sought to prove, both art and science, using barbarous means, affirm, when 'true' to their respective vocations, the fiery rule of doing.

 

30.  Likewise, both literature and politics, using civilized means, affirm, when 'true' to their respective vocations, the watery governance of giving.

 

31.  Similarly, both sculpture and economics, using natural means, affirm, when 'true' to their respective vocations, the vegetative representativeness of taking.

 

32.  Finally, both music and religion, using cultural means, affirm, when true to their respective vocations, the airy leadership of being.

 

33.  Because doing cannot exist except in relation to fiery appearances, it is that in which the ugliness and/or beauty of things is made manifest.

 

34.  Because giving cannot exist except in relation to watery quantities, it is that in which the weakness and/or strength of things is made manifest.

 

35.  Because taking cannot exist except in relation to vegetative qualities, it is that in which the ignorance and/or knowledge of things is made manifest.

 

36.  Because being cannot exist except in relation to airy essences, it is that in which the falsity and/or truth of things is made manifest.

 

 

CYCLE FIFTEEN

 

1.   Just as, of all writers, the poet is the one who should be most concerned with doing, and hence the ugliness and/or beauty of things, so the dramatist is the writer whose principal concern should be with giving, and hence the weakness and/or strength of things.

 

2.   Just as, of all writers, the novelist is the one who should be most concerned with taking, and hence the ignorance and/or knowledge of things, so the philosopher is the writer whose principal concern should be with being, and hence the falsity and/or truth of things.

 

3.   Although literature is a feminine art form overall on account of its fluidal basis, it is subdivisible, as we have shown, into quasi-diabolic, feminine, quasi-masculine, and quasi-divine genres, according to whether doing, giving, taking, or being is the principal concern.

 

4.   As the quasi-diabolic mode of literature, poetry approximates to art in its concern, through fiery appearances, with doing.

 

5.   As the feminine mode of literature par excellence, drama is the per se manifestation of literature in its concern, through watery quantities, with giving.

 

6.   As the quasi-masculine mode of literature, fiction approximates to sculpture in its concern, through vegetative qualities, with taking.

 

7.   As the quasi-divine mode of literature, philosophy approximates to music in its concern, through airy essences, with being.

 

8.   The association of doing with evil is not as marked in poetry as in art, given the properly metachemical status of the latter in relation to what, in poetry, would be merely quasi-metachemical from a chemical, or watery, basis.

 

9.   The association of giving with good is more marked in drama than in any other art form, given the properly chemical status of drama in relation to what, in for instance water-colour art, would be quasi-chemical from a metachemical, or fiery, basis.

 

10.  The association of taking with folly is not as marked in fiction as in sculpture, given the properly physical status of the latter in relation to what, in fiction, would be merely quasi-physical from a chemical, or watery, basis.

 

11.  The association of being with wisdom is not as marked in philosophy as in music, given the properly metaphysical status of the latter in relation to what, in philosophy, would be merely quasi-metaphysical from a chemical, or watery, basis.

 

12.  Hence just as the poet is only quasi-evil in relation to the painterly artist, the metachemical artist par excellence, so the water-colour artist is only quasi-good in relation to the dramatist, the chemical writer par excellence.

 

13.  For evil, remember, is absolutist in its noumenal objectivity, whereas good(ness) is merely relativistic in what amounts, by comparison, to a phenomenally objective per se.

 

14.  Now just as the fiction-writer, or novelist, is only quasi-foolish in relation to the figurative sculptor, the physical sculptor par excellence, so the philosopher is only quasi-wise in relation to the musician, the metaphysical 'artist' par excellence.

 

15.  For wisdom, remember, is absolutist in its noumenal subjectivity, whereas folly is merely relativistic in what amounts, by comparison, to a phenomenally subjective per se.

 

16.  Nevertheless, the philosopher is the writer whose principal concern is or should be with being, and hence wisdom.

 

17.  For wisdom is only possible in relation to being, just as folly is only possible in relation to taking, goodness only possible in relation to giving, and evil only possible in relation to doing.

 

18.  Hence the philosopher, the lover (philo) of wisdom (sophia), is the 'wise writer' or 'wise literary artist' ... to the extent that he bends what is fundamentally a chemical, or fluidal, medium to the service of airy metaphysics.

 

19.  Yet 'the writer', conceived in general terms, is really less wise and/or foolish than good, since the utilization of fluidal means (ink) to whatever end is rather more feminine (civilized) than either divine (cultural), masculine (natural), or diabolic (barbarous).

 

20.  At least that must be so of the 'classical writer', whose utilization of fluidal means ties-in with the existence of a civilized age and/or society, not of the writer who exists in some other age and/or society as an effective 'bovaryization' of writing vis--vis the hegemony of either fire, vegetation, or air, as the case may be, and whose preferred medium of literary presentation will reflect this fact both generically and technologically.

 

21.  Thus while the dramatist will be the most representative writer of an age and/or society in which water is the governing element, in due civilized fashion, an age ruled by fire will encourage the poetic mode of literary 'bovaryization', an age represented by vegetation (earth) will encourage the novelistic mode of literary 'bovaryization', and an age led by air will encourage the philosophical mode of literary 'bovaryization'.

 

22.  Within a civilized age, writing will generally proceed via pen, whether in relation to quill pens, fountain-pens, felt-tip pens, or biros ... as the most likely fluidal parallels to fire, water, vegetation, and air respectively, whereas within a natural age, the procedure of writing will generally be conducted via typewriters and/or word processors in due vegetative vein.

 

23.  Within a barbarous age, writing will generally proceed via such fiery means as paints, coloured inks, crayons, and pencils, whereas within a cultural age, the procedure of writing will generally be conducted via such airy means as personal computers.

 

24.  It is probably fair to maintain that computers offer a vegetative base, on hard disc, from which the dissemination of written information via the Internet can proceed in due quasi-metaphysical vein, in keeping with its universal essence.

 

25.  Needless to say, the only mode of writing which is truly commensurate with Internet universalization is the quasi-metaphysical 'bovaryization' of literature called philosophy.

 

26.  Philosophy should be freely available on the Internet, and not made the subversive subject of capital gain.

 

27.  For capitalism, as an economic pursuit, is more suited to the folly of vegetative naturalism than to the wisdom of airy idealism, wherein religious considerations take over.

 

 

CYCLE SIXTEEN

 

1.   Where there is maximum ugliness and hatred there can be only minimum beauty and love, and vice versa.

 

2.   Ugliness and hatred, which are two aspects of negative doing, do not exist entirely independently of beauty and love since, in the final analysis, there are no completely absolute noumenal absolutes.  Neither, conversely, do beauty and love, as two aspects of positive doing, exist entirely independently of ugliness and hatred.

 

3.   One should distinguish, in both external and internal contexts of doing, most ugliness and hatred/least beauty and love from least ugliness and hatred/most beauty and love, and each of these elemental extremes from the intermediate (molecular) ratios of more (compared to most) ugliness and hatred/less (compared to least) beauty and love, and less (compared to least) ugliness and hatred/more (compared to most) beauty and love.

 

4.   Hence we can plot an overall progression, in relation to doing, from the elemental negativity of most ugliness and hatred/least beauty and love to the elemental positivity of least ugliness and hatred/most beauty and love via the molecular negativity of more (compared to most) ugliness and hatred/less (compared to least) beauty and love and the molecular positivity of less (compared to least) ugliness and hatred/more (compared to most) beauty and love.

 

5.   Where there is maximum weakness and humility, if not humiliation, there can be only minimum strength and pride, and vice versa.

 

6.   Weakness and humility, which are two aspects of negative giving, do not exist entirely independently of strength and pride since, in the final analysis, there are no completely absolute phenomenal relativities.  Neither, conversely, do strength and pride exist entirely independently of weakness and humility.

 

7.   One should distinguish, in both external and internal contexts of giving, most weakness and humility/least strength and pride from least weakness and humility/most strength and pride, and each of these elemental extremes from the intermediate (molecular) ratios of more (compared to most) weakness and humility/less (compared to least) strength and pride, and less (compared to least) weakness and humility/more (compared to most) strength and pride.

 

8.   Hence we can plot an overall progression, in relation to giving, from the elemental negativity of most weakness and humility/least strength and pride to the elemental positivity of least weakness and humility/most strength and pride via the molecular negativity of more (compared to most) weakness and humility/less (compared to least) strength and pride and the molecular positivity of less (compared to least) weakness and humility/more (compared to most) strength and pride.

 

9.   Where there is maximum ignorance and pain there can be only minimum knowledge and pleasure, and vice versa.

 

10.  Ignorance and pain, which are two aspects of negative taking, do not exist entirely independently of knowledge and pleasure since, in the final analysis, there are no completely absolute phenomenal relativities.  Neither, conversely, do knowledge and pleasure, as two aspects of positive taking, exist entirely independently of ignorance and pain.

 

11.  One should distinguish, in both external and internal contexts of taking, least knowledge and pleasure/most ignorance and pain from most knowledge and pleasure/least ignorance and pain, and each of these elemental extremes from the intermediate (molecular) ratios of less (compared to least) knowledge and pleasure/more (compared to most) ignorance and pain, and more (compared to most) knowledge and pleasure/less (compared to least) ignorance and pain.

 

12.  Hence we can plot an overall progression, in relation to taking, from the elemental negativity of least knowledge and pleasure/most ignorance and pain to the elemental positivity of most knowledge and pleasure/least ignorance and pain via the molecular negativity of less (compared to least) knowledge and pleasure/more (compared to most) ignorance and pain and the molecular positivity of more (compared to most) knowledge and pleasure/less (compared to least) ignorance and pain.

 

13.  Where there is maximum falsity and woe there can be only minimum truth and joy, and vice versa.

 

14.  Falsity and woe, which are two aspects of negative being, do not exist entirely independently of truth and joy since, in the final analysis, there are no completely absolute noumenal absolutes.  Neither, conversely, do truth and joy, as two aspects of positive being, exist entirely independently of falsity and woe.

 

15.  One should distinguish, in both external and internal contexts of being, least truth and joy/most falsity and woe from most truth and joy/least falsity and woe, and each of these elemental extremes from the intermediate (molecular) ratios of less (compared to least) truth and joy/more (compared to most) falsity and woe, and more (compared to most) truth and joy/less (compared to least) falsity and woe.

 

16.  Hence we can plot an overall progression, in relation to being, from the elemental negativity of least truth and joy/most falsity and woe to the elemental positivity of most truth and joy/least falsity and woe via the molecular negativity of less (compared to least) truth and joy/more (compared to most) falsity and woe and the molecular positivity of more (compared to most) truth and joy/less (compared to least) falsity and woe.

 

17.  From the most particles/least wavicles and the more (compared to most) particles/less (compared to least) wavicles of negative doing to the less (compared to least) particles/more (compared to most) wavicles and the least particles/most wavicles of positive doing in relation to photons (external) and photinos (internal).

 

18.  From the most particles/least wavicles and the more (compared to most) particles/less (compared to least) wavicles of negative giving to the less (compared to least) particles/more (compared to most) wavicles and the least particles/most wavicles of positive giving in relation to electrons and/or positrons (external) and electrinos and/or positrinos (internal).

 

19.  From the least wavicles/most particles and the less (compared to least) wavicles/more (compared to most) particles of negative taking to the more (compared to most) wavicles/less (compared to least) particles and the most wavicles/least particles of positive taking in relation to neutrons and/or deuterons (external) and neutrinos and/or deuterinos (internal).

 

20.  From the least wavicles/most particles and the less (compared to least) wavicles/more (compared to most) particles of negative being to the more (compared to most) wavicles/less (compared to least) particles and the most wavicles/least particles of positive being in relation to protons (external) and protinos (internal).

 

21.  In general terms, the particle subdivision of an element and/or elementino equates with negativity and the wavicle subdivision thereof with positivity, though, as indicated above, a predominating particle ratio will qualify for a negative definition and a predominating or, rather, preponderating wavicle ratio, by contrast, for a positive definition overall.

 

22.  The objective axes of doing in relation to space-time metachemistry and of giving in relation to volume-mass chemistry should be read from particle to wavicle, as from negative to positive.

 

23.  Conversely, the subjective axes of taking in relation to mass-volume physics and of being in relation to time-space metaphysics should be read from wavicle to particle, as from positive to negative.

 

24.  This is what distinguishes the 'falling' nature or, rather, unnature of the objective axes from the 'rising' nature of the subjective axes, since the former are dominated by a vacuum in due female fashion, while the latter are liberated by a plenum in due male vein.

 

25.  That which is negative is so by dint of its affiliation with the particle aspect of subatomic bodies, whereas that which is positive is so by dint of its affiliation with the wavicle aspect of such bodies, and this whether in connection with a predominating negativity or a preponderating positivity in the subatomic subdivision as a whole.

 

26.  Hence, to take a single example, the most ugliness and hatred/least beauty and love of negative doing in its elemental mode is commensurate with a most particle/least wavicle ratio of subatomic factors in which negativity considerably predominates over positivity, while, conversely, the least ugliness and hatred/most beauty and love of positive doing in its elemental mode is commensurate with a least particle/most wavicle ratio of subatomic factors in which negativity is considerably preponderated over by positivity.

 

 

CYCLE SEVENTEEN

 

1.   Continuing on from the above, the more (compared to most) ugliness and hatred/less (compared to least) beauty and love of negative doing in its molecular mode is commensurate with a more (compared to most) particle/less (compared to least) wavicle ratio of subatomic factors in which negativity predominates over positivity, while, conversely, the less (compared to least) ugliness and hatred/more (compared to most) beauty and love of positive doing in its molecular mode is commensurate with a less (compared to least) particle/more (compared to most) wavicle ratio of subatomic factors in which negativity is preponderated over by positivity.

 

2.   On the other hand, the least truth and joy/most falsity and woe of negative being in its elemental mode is commensurate with a least wavicle/most particle ratio of subatomic factors in which positivity is considerably predominated over by negativity, while, conversely, the most truth and joy/least falsity and woe of positive being in its elemental mode is commensurate with a most wavicle/least particle ratio of subatomic factors in which positivity considerably preponderates over negativity.

 

3.   Likewise, the less (compared to least) truth and joy/more (compared to most) falsity and woe of negative being in its molecular mode is commensurate with a less (compared to least) wavicle/more (compared to most) particle ratio of subatomic factors in which positivity is predominated over by negativity, while, conversely, the more (compared to most) truth and joy/less (compared to least) falsity and woe of positive being in its molecular mode is commensurate with a more (compared to most) wavicle/less (compared to least) particle ratio of subatomic factors in which positivity preponderates over negativity.

 

4.   Now what applies to the noumenal antithesis of doing and being applies no less to the phenomenal antithesis of giving and taking, as in the following aphorisms where, firstly, the most weakness and humility/least strength and pride of negative giving in its elemental mode is commensurate with a most particle/least wavicle ratio of subatomic factors in which negativity considerably predominates over positivity, while, conversely, the least weakness and humility/most strength and pride of positive giving in its elemental mode is commensurate with a least particle/most wavicle ratio of subatomic factors in which negativity is considerably preponderated over by positivity.

 

5.   Likewise, the more (compared to most) weakness and humility/less (compared to least) strength and pride of negative giving in its molecular mode is commensurate with a more (compared to most) particle/less (compared to least) wavicle ratio of subatomic factors in which negativity predominates over positivity, while, conversely, the less (compared to least) weakness and humility/more (compared to most) strength and pride of positive giving in its molecular mode is commensurate with a less (compared to least) particle/more (compared to most) wavicle ratio of subatomic factors in which negativity is preponderated over by positivity.

 

6.   On the other hand, the least knowledge and pleasure/most ignorance and pain of negative taking in its elemental mode is commensurate with a least wavicle/most particle ratio of subatomic factors in which positivity is considerably predominated over by negativity, while, conversely, the most knowledge and pleasure/least ignorance and pain of positive taking in its elemental mode is commensurate with a most wavicle/least particle ratio of subatomic factors in which positivity considerably preponderates over negativity.

 

7.   Likewise, the less (compared to least) knowledge and pleasure/more (compared to most) ignorance and pain of negative taking in its molecular mode is commensurate with a less (compared to least) wavicle/more (compared to most) particle ratio of subatomic factors in which positivity is predominated over by negativity, while, conversely, the more (compared to most) knowledge and pleasure/less (compared to least) ignorance and pain of positive taking in its molecular mode is commensurate with a more (compared to most) wavicle/less (compared to least) particle ratio of subatomic factors in which positivity preponderates over negativity.

 

8.   Things can be negative or positive in external, or 'once-born' contexts no less than in internal, or 're-born' ones, except that there will be a greater degree of negativity vis--vis positivity in the former and a greater degree of positivity vis--vis negativity in the latter, as things proceed, in both impersonal and personal terms, from primal and/or sensual elements to supreme and/or sensible elementinos, the primal and supreme correlating with impersonal forms of external and internal existence, the sensual and sensible with their personal counterparts thereof.

 

9.   As I have endeavoured to prove in previous texts, the fourfold subdivision of any given element and/or elementino implies a basic negative/positive dichotomy between elemental and molecular particles on the one hand, and molecular and elemental wavicles on the other hand.  Such a dichotomy correlates with a distinction between what may be described as the scientific and political subdivisions of an element and/or elementino and, by contrast, its economic and religious subdivisions, the former effectively impersonal (primal or supreme) in their particle-biased predominance, and the latter effectively personal (sensual or sensible) in their wavicle-biased preponderance.

 

10.  However, while for general purposes the above dichotomy still holds true, one can now see, in light of our latest findings, that both the impersonal and personal options extend the entire breadth of any given axis, since negativity and positivity are not entirely separate or independent entities but co-exist with one another whatever the overall ratio of subatomic factors may happen to be.

 

11.  Thus there is some impersonal negativity even in the economic and religious subdivisions of any given element and/or elementino, while, conversely, some positivity will cling, in personal terms, to even the most negative of subatomic contexts, whose predominating particle bias would lead us to infer a scientific and/or political correlation, as before.

 

12.  This helps to explain why there are religious aspects to science no less than scientific aspects to religion, despite the predominating negativity of the one and the preponderating positivity of the other.

 

13.  Similarly, where the intermediate, or molecular, disciplines are concerned, one would be hard-pressed to avoid concluding that there are economic aspects to politics no less than political aspects to economics, since some positivity will accrue, in subordinate fashion, to the former and some negativity likewise accrue, in subordinate manner, to the latter.

 

 

CYCLE EIGHTEEN

 

1.   The devolution, through spatial space, of primal doing from most to least via more and less ugliness and hatred is paralleled by the 'evolution', through spatial space, of sensual doing from least to most via less and more beauty and love.

 

2.   The devolution, through repetitive time, of supreme doing from most to least via more and less ugliness and hatred is paralleled by the 'evolution', through repetitive time, of sensible doing from least to most via less and more beauty and love.

 

3.   Hence space-time metachemistry affords us a primary/secondary contrast between the particle-based devolution of both primal and supreme doing and the wavicle-biased 'evolution' of both sensual and sensible doing.

 

4.   The devolution, through volumetric volume, of primal giving from most to least via more and less weakness and humility is paralleled by the 'evolution', through volumetric volume, of sensual giving from least to most via less and more strength and pride.

 

5.   The devolution, through massed mass, of supreme giving from most to least via more and less weakness and humility is paralleled by the 'evolution', through massed mass, of sensible giving from least to most via less and more strength and pride.

 

6.   Hence volume-mass chemistry affords us a primary/secondary contrast between the particle-based devolution of both primal and supreme giving and the wavicle-biased 'evolution' of both sensual and sensible giving.

 

7.   Conversely, the evolution, through massive mass, of sensual taking from least to most via less and more knowledge and pleasure is paralleled by the 'devolution', through massive mass, of primal taking from most to least via more and less ignorance and pain.

 

8.   The evolution, through voluminous volume, of sensible taking from least to most via less and more knowledge and pleasure is paralleled by the 'devolution', through voluminous volume, of supreme taking from most to least via more and less ignorance and pain.

 

9.   Hence mass-volume physics affords us a primary/secondary contrast between the wavicle-centred evolution of both sensual and sensible taking and the particle-biased 'devolution' of both primal and supreme taking.

 

10.  The evolution, through sequential time, of sensual being from least to most via less and more truth and joy is paralleled by the 'devolution', through sequential time, of primal being from most to least via more and less falsity and woe.

 

11.  The evolution, through spaced space, of sensible being from least to most via less and more truth and joy is paralleled by the 'devolution', through spaced space, of supreme being from most to least via more and less falsity and woe.

 

12.  Hence time-space metaphysics affords us a primary/secondary contrast between the wavicle-centred evolution of sensual and sensible being and the particle-biased 'devolution' of primal and supreme being.

 

13.  Devolution is primary on the objective axes of space-time metachemistry and volume-mass chemistry, but secondary on the subjective axes of mass-volume physics and time-space metaphysics.

 

14.  Conversely, evolution is primary on the subjective axes of mass-volume physics and time-space metaphysics, but secondary on the objective axes of space-time metachemistry and volume-mass chemistry.

 

15.  In broad terms, fire and water both 'fall', in keeping with their vacuously conditioned dispositions towards objectivity in what amounts to a direct (barbed) divergence and/or convergence, as the case may be.

 

16.  In broad terms, vegetation and air both 'rise', in keeping with their plenum-conditioned dispositions towards subjectivity in what amounts to an indirect (curved) divergence and/or convergence, as the case may be.

 

17.  The 'fall' of fire from stellar to Venusian in impersonal terms is paralleled by its 'fall' from eyes to heart in personal terms.

 

18.  The 'fall' of water from lunar to oceanic in impersonal terms is paralleled by its 'fall' from tongue to womb in personal terms.

 

19.  The 'rise' of vegetation from earthy to Martian in impersonal terms is paralleled by its 'rise' from phallus to brain in personal terms.

 

20.  The 'rise' of air from solar to Saturnian in impersonal terms is paralleled by its 'rise' from ears to lungs in personal terms.

 

21.  That which 'falls' is ever female in its objective disposition, whereas that which 'rises' is ever male in its subjective disposition.

 

22.  The female aspect of life is divisible, as already noted, between the devility of space-time metachemistry and the femininity of volume-mass chemistry, fire and water, dress and skirt, whereas the male aspect of life is divisible, in contrary terms, between the masculinity of mass-volume physics and the divinity of time-space metaphysics, vegetation and air, trousers and zippersuit.

 

23.  It is on account of its objective nature or, rather, unnature ... that the female aspect of life is primary, and on account, by contrast, of its subjective nature that the male aspect of life is secondary.

 

24.  Males are very much the 'second sex' in an objective age, an age dominated by fire and/or water, whereas females are relegated, despite their primary dispositions, to a secondary or, rather, subordinate status in a subjective age, an age centred in vegetation and/or air.

 

25.  The present age is becoming, through the hegemony of economics, increasingly subjective in relation to vegetation, and may well be superseded, in the coming decades, by the hegemony of religion, thereby allowing air to replace vegetation as the principal element in what would be less a masculine than a divine age.

 

26.  I look forward, as a philosopher, a proponent of wisdom, to the supersession of economics by religion, so that life may climb out of the naturalistic bog of sinful folly which currently prevails and achieve an idealistic accommodation with graceful wisdom, abandoning taking for being, and thus knowledge and pleasure for truth and joy.

 

27.  For unless people embrace the wisdom of being, they will continue to remain bogged down in the folly of taking, with males only relatively beyond evil and good, doing and giving, rather than absolutely beyond it ... in and through being.

 

28.  It generally happens that, despite shifts of emphasis, taking remains dominated by doing and giving, as by the control of 'the great' and 'the good', whose gender correspondence is, after all, rather more to the female side of life than to its male side.

 

29.  This is certainly the British experience, wherein such taking as exists is firmly under the shadow, in non-American fashion, of doing and giving, the one politically closer to Labour and the other to the Conservatives.

 

30.  Yet the British are so lacking in being, or respect for being, that the majority of them are able to take this objectively-dominated situation for granted, and to kowtow to doing or giving, the monarchy or parliament, even when they are predominantly committed to taking.

 

31.  Such is also the case, fundamentally, for Anglicans vis--vis Dissenters and Puritans, thereby proving, beyond any shadow of a doubt, how religion tends to condition politics, and vice versa.

 

32.  A man who was intent upon advancing the development of being within the People, a wise and philosophical man, would not wish to encourage their self-division and fragmentation under doing, giving, and taking, nor would he allow the existence of pseudo-being within the higher ranks of the aristocracy to beguile him into complacently acquiescing in such a situation at the expense of true being.

 

33.  Being can only be furthered amongst the People when they are released from self-division and exist, ever after, in non-demonstrative, as distinct from demonstrative, opposition to an administrative control.

 

34.  Obviously, where a people are divided democratically (not to mention denominationally) from one another along party-political lines, they can only be released from such a being-defeating system democratically, in terms of voting for religious sovereignty, as taught by me, and through that an end to political 'sins of the World'.

 

35.  For religious sovereignty would be more than political sovereignty, and consequently that which could liberate the People from self-division, making an accommodation with the self (whether directly for a spiritual elite or indirectly, via some vegetative or watery alternative, for the generality of less spiritual persons) its chief priority.

 

 

CYCLE NINETEEN

 

1.   I intimated, several cycles ago, that, at its purest manifestation, mind is spiritual, and thus a reflection, through awareness, of being, which derives its essential nature (supernature) from the air one breathes as a human being.

 

2.   Hence without air, there would not only be no human beings but no being, since being is that which accords with awareness as the property of essence, and air is the essential element, the one that, being metaphysical, lies beyond the perceptions of the senses as that which cannot be seen but nonetheless everywhere mystically is.

 

3.   In this respect, the metaphysical element of air transcends not only the physical element of vegetation, but, more indirectly, the chemical element of water and the metachemical element of fire, the latter of which exists in a noumenally antithetical relationship to it, as, in general terms, appearance to essence.

 

4.   I am not simply because I exist, since anything can exist, even an inanimate object, but because I experience being as a condition of breathing, which makes me sentient (aware).

 

5.   Hence the experience of awareness, or being, is conditional upon my continuing to breathe, though only through a determination to breathe consciously, which is meditation, can I experience enhanced being and thus the maximum of awareness of which I, as a sentient being, am capable.

 

6.   The philosopher can do no more, as a wise man, than to advocate meditation as the methodology by which being is maximized, and one enters into the grace of the Elect of Spirit.

 

7.   Such an Elect of Spirit are not only superhuman but, more specifically, supermasculine, since they achieve a superconscious accommodation of the inner metaphysical self, the mind, to spirit in spaced space, which is the only Space in which sensible being can thrive.

 

8.   By contrast, spatial space would amount to a superfeminine irrelevance to such supermen, since only that which is super-unconscious can thrive in spatial space, and it does so not on the basis of spirit, of air, but on the basis of soul, of fire, particularly, at that level, with regard to the eyes.

 

9.   Hence the supermasculine is as far removed, in Space, from the superfeminine ... as it is possible to conceive of, and thus that which appertains to the omega of Space as opposed to its alpha.

 

10.  Such an omega of Space is commensurate with a sensible subjectivity, and it contrasts, absolutely, with the sensual objectivity of the alpha of Space, wherein the superfeminine Devil ... of super-unnature ... is enthroned.

 

11.  Thus whereas mind is spiritual, associated (through metaphysics) with the ears in sensuality and with the lungs in sensibility, soul, by contrast, is emotional, associated (through metachemistry) with the eyes in sensuality and with the heart in sensibility, and therefore concerned, fundamentally, not with being but with doing, its metachemical antithesis.

 

12.  The philosopher, when genuine, will not be one to advocate doing through soul, after the fashion of, say, poets, and neither will he advocate giving through the id or taking through the ego, after the respective fashions of dramatists and novelists (fiction writers).

 

13.  For whereas the id is instinctual and thus feminine, associated chemically with the tongue in sensuality and with the womb in sensibility, the ego is intellectual and thus masculine, associated physically with the phallus in sensuality and with the brain in sensibility, and both of these are shortfalls from the philosopher's concern, as a metaphysician, with being through spirit, which alone makes for wisdom.

 

14.  Where this particular philosopher differs from previous philosophers is in his advocacy, through the concept of religious sovereignty, of a triadic Beyond, commensurate with 'Kingdom Come', in which giving and taking defer, beingfully, to being, while doing, duly transmuted, takes upon itself the burden of administering such a triadic Beyond, in order that the People may be united, under Social Transcendentalism, the ideological religion of 'Kingdom Come', as advocated by he who effectively corresponds, in his Messianic wisdom, to a Second Coming.

 

15.  For only through this 'philosopher king' can the People elect for religious sovereignty when the opportunity arises, and only through religious sovereignty will they be saved from their political 'sins of the World', to enter, beyond that, into the triadic framework of 'Kingdom Come', the Social Transcendental Centre, or context of religious sovereignty, wherein being will peak at an all-time high not only in relation to the heavenly purity of true being, but also in relation to the deferential lower tiers of what might be called the giving-being and taking-being of a New Purgatory and a New Earth respectively.

 

 

CYCLE TWENTY

 

1.   Where there is form there is content, and vice versa.  Beauty presupposes love and love presupposes beauty, to take but one example.  Beauty can no more exist independently of love than love ... of beauty.

 

2.   Hence we can maintain, with due confidence, that where there is most beauty, there will be most love, while, conversely, it should also follow that the least beauty will imply the least love, since content is proportionate to form.

 

3.   However, while the ratio of form to content is one that increases from least to most via less and more the further we ascend the scale of positive values, it is no less the case that the ratio of what may be called antiform to anticontent will decrease, proportionately, as we descend, in due objective fashion, from most to least via more and less, and this whether with regard to ugliness and hatred or to any of the other manifestations of antiform and anticontent which pertain to the remaining three elemental axes.

 

4.   Thus we may plot the descent of metachemical antiform and anticontent, within space-time materialism, from most to least via more and less ugliness and hatred as the negative counterpart to the ascent, therein, of metachemical form and content from least to most via less and more beauty and love.

 

5.   Likewise, we may plot the descent of chemical antiform and anticontent, within volume-mass realism, from most to least via more and less weakness and humility as the negative counterpart to the ascent, therein, of chemical form and content from least to most via less and more strength and pride.

 

6.   Conversely, we may plot the ascent of physical form and content, within mass-volume naturalism, from least to most via less and more knowledge and pleasure as the positive counterpart to the descent, therein, of physical antiform and anticontent from most to least via more and less ignorance and pain.

 

7.   Finally, we may plot the ascent of metaphysical form and content, within time-space idealism, from least to most via less and more truth and joy as the positive counterpart to the descent, therein, of metaphysical antiform and anticontent from most to least via more and less falsity and woe.

 

8.   The noumenally objective descent of metachemical antiform (ugliness) and anticontent (hatred), within space-time materialism, duly proceeds from most to least via more and less negative evil, whereas the noumenally objective ascent, therein, of metachemical form (beauty) and content (love) duly proceeds from least to most via less and more positive evil.

 

9.   The phenomenally objective descent of chemical antiform (weakness) and anticontent (humility), within volume-mass realism, duly proceeds from most to least via more and less negative good, whereas the phenomenally objective ascent, therein, of chemical form (strength) and content (pride) duly proceeds from least to most via less and more positive good.

 

10.  Conversely, the phenomenally subjective ascent of physical form (knowledge) and content (pleasure), within mass-volume naturalism, duly proceeds from least to most via less and more positive folly, whereas the phenomenally subjective descent, therein, of physical antiform (ignorance) and anticontent (pain) duly proceeds from most to least via more and less negative folly.

 

11.  Finally, the noumenally subjective ascent of metaphysical form (truth) and content (joy), within time-space idealism, duly proceeds from least to most via less and more positive wisdom, whereas the noumenally subjective descent, therein, of metaphysical antiform (falsity) and anticontent (woe) duly proceeds from most to least via more and less negative wisdom.

 

12.  Hence each elemental axis, from fire and water to vegetation and air, affords us the contrast, in both external ('once-born') and internal ('re-born') contexts, of antiform and anticontent with form and content, of elemental negativity with elemental positivity.

 

13.  Elemental negativity will be primary on the objective axes of fire and water but secondary on the subjective axes of vegetation and air, whether it be in a predominant or a subordinate ratio.

 

14.  Elemental positivity will be secondary on the objective axes of fire and water but primary on the subjective axes of vegetation and air, whether it be in a subordinate or a preponderant ratio.

 

15.  These contentions can be confirmed by the fact that photons and photinos, corresponding to space-time materialism, are metachemical elements/elementinos whose overall charge is negative, whereas protons and protinos, corresponding to time-space idealism, are metaphysical elements/elementinos whose overall charge is positive.

 

16.  Likewise, electrons and electrinos, corresponding to volume-mass realism, are chemical elements/elementinos whose overall charge is negative, whereas neutrons and neutrinos, corresponding to mass-volume naturalism, are physical elements whose overall charge is positive or, at any rate, neutral with a positive bias or capacity.

 

17.  This is more so of deuterons and deuterinos, the radical (Christian) counterpart to neutrons and neutrinos, which have the capacity to serve, in properly masculine vein, as a vegetative support for protons and/or protinos, while the positive charge, overall, of positrons and positrinos affords us the converse example of a watery mode of feminine self-denial which is more suited to a pseudo-Heathen/quasi-Christian position than would be the overly negative charges of electrons and electrinos, dominating neutrons and/or neutrinos from a heathenistic vantage-point that backs-on to photons and/or photinos in due fundamentalist fashion.

 

18.  Whereas the Devil (super-unnature to sub-unnature) is the antiform and/or form of metachemical evil, Hell (super-unconscious to sub-unconscious) is the anticontent and/or content thereof, depending, in each case, whether the noumenal objectivity of space-time materialism is in its negative or its positive mode.

 

19.  Whereas woman (upper unnature to lower unnature) is the antiform and/or form of chemical good, purgatory (upper unconscious to lower unconscious) is the anticontent and/or content thereof, depending, in each case, whether the phenomenal objectivity of volume-mass realism is in its negative or its positive mode.

 

20.  Whereas man (lower nature to upper nature) is the antiform and/or form of physical folly, earth (lower conscious to upper conscious) is the anticontent and/or content thereof, depending, in each case, whether the phenomenal subjectivity of mass-volume naturalism is in its negative or its positive mode.

 

21.  Whereas God (subnature to supernature) is the antiform and/or form of metaphysical wisdom, Heaven (subconscious to superconscious) is the anticontent and/or content thereof, depending, in each case, whether the noumenal subjectivity of time-space idealism is in its negative or its positive mode.

 

22.  That which mediates between the Devil and Hell, whether negatively in antiform and anticontent or positively in form and content, is either superfeminine with regard to Space or subfeminine with regard to Time, the former spatial, the latter repetitive.

 

23.  That which mediates between woman and purgatory, whether negatively in antiform and anticontent or positively in form and content, is either upper feminine with regard to Volume or lower feminine with regard to Mass, the former volumetric, the latter massed.

 

24.  That which mediates between man and earth, whether negatively in antiform and anticontent or positively in form and content, is either lower masculine with regard to Mass or upper masculine with regard to Volume, the former massive, the latter voluminous.

 

25.  That which mediates between God and Heaven, whether negatively in antiform and anticontent or positively in form and content, is either submasculine with regard to Time or supermasculine with regard to Space, the former sequential, the latter spaced.

 

 

CYCLE TWENTY-ONE

 

1.   To distinguish the metachemical antiform and anticontent of anti-art, descending in space-time materialism from most to least via more and less ugliness and hatred, from the metachemical form and content of art, ascending in space-time materialism from least to most via less and more beauty and love.

 

2.   To distinguish the chemical antiform and anticontent of anti-literature, descending in volume-mass realism from most to least via more and less weakness and humility, from the chemical form and content of literature, ascending in volume-mass realism from least to most via less and more strength and pride.

 

3.   Conversely, to distinguish the physical form and content of sculpture, ascending in mass-volume naturalism from least to most via less and more knowledge and pleasure, from the physical antiform and anticontent of anti-sculpture, descending in mass-volume naturalism from most to least via more and less ignorance and pain.

 

4.   To distinguish the metaphysical form and content of music, ascending in time-space idealism from least to most via less and more truth and joy, from the metaphysical antiform and anticontent of anti-music, descending in time-space idealism from most to least via more and less falsity and woe.

 

5.   Space-time materialism affords us, in view of its noumenal objectivity, a contrast between anti-art as primary and art as secondary, since anti-art is that which descends, in due particle-based fashion, from most to least via more and less antiform (ugliness) and anticontent (hatred).

 

6.   Likewise volume-mass realism affords us, in view of its phenomenal objectivity, a contrast between anti-literature as primary and literature as secondary, since anti-literature is that which descends, in due particle-based fashion, from most to least via more and less antiform (weakness) and anticontent (humility).

 

7.   Conversely mass-volume naturalism affords us, in view of its phenomenal subjectivity, a contrast between sculpture as primary and anti-sculpture as secondary, since sculpture is that which ascends, in due wavicle-centred vein, from least to most via less and more form (knowledge) and content (pleasure).

 

8.   Likewise time-space idealism affords us, in view of its noumenal subjectivity, a contrast between music as primary and anti-music as secondary, since music is that which ascends, in due wavicle-centred vein, from least to most via less and more form (truth) and content (joy).

 

9.   The domination of art and literature by anti-art and anti-literature is the objective counterpart to the liberation of sculpture and music from anti-sculpture and anti-music in due subjective vein.

 

10.  Anti-art is never more ugly and hateful nor art less beautiful and lovely than in the scientific subdivisions of space-time materialism, while, conversely, anti-art is never less ugly and hateful nor art more beautiful and lovely than in the religious subdivisions thereof.

 

11.  Likewise, anti-literature is never weaker and humbler nor literature stronger and prouder than in the scientific subdivisions of volume-mass realism, while, conversely, anti-literature is never less weak and humble nor literature more strong and proud than in the religious subdivisions thereof.

 

12.  By contrast, sculpture is never less knowledgeable and pleasurable nor anti-sculpture more ignorant and painful than in the scientific subdivisions of mass-volume naturalism, while, conversely, sculpture is never more knowledgeable and pleasurable nor anti-sculpture less ignorant and painful than in the religious subdivisions thereof.

 

13.  Similarly, music is never less true and joyful nor anti-music more false and woeful than in the scientific subdivisions of time-space idealism, while, conversely music is never more true and joyful nor anti-music less false and woeful than in the religious subdivisions thereof.

 

14.  Since form and content are proportionate in both their negative and positive manifestations, we cannot claim that there will be more form and less content in art and literature, as against less form and more content in sculpture and music.  On the contrary, all we can claim with any certainty is that the nature of form and content will differ from one art form to another, even as the type of form and content remains approximately constant within any given art form.

 

15.  Hence we have to distinguish the apparent form and content of art, whether in its negative or its positive mode, from the quantitative form and content of literature, and further distinguish each of these objective art forms from the qualitative form and content of sculpture and, least but hardly subjectively least, the essential form and content of music.

 

16.  Thus since the apparent form and content of art derives from its metachemical basis in materialism, we may hold that form and content in art will always be apparent, even as it undergoes proportionate modifications in keeping with a descent (if negative) from most to least via more and less ugliness and hatred, or an ascent (if positive) from least to most via less and more beauty and love - the former options primary and the latter ones secondary.

 

17.  Likewise, since the quantitative form and content of literature derives from its chemical basis in realism, we may hold that form and content in literature will always be quantitative, even as it undergoes proportionate modifications in keeping with a descent (if negative) from most to least via more and less weakness and humility, or an ascent (if positive) from least to most via less and more strength and pride - the former options primary and the latter ones secondary.

 

18.  Conversely, since the qualitative form and content of sculpture derives from its physical basis in naturalism, we may hold that form and content in sculpture will always be qualitative, even as it undergoes proportionate modifications in keeping with an ascent (if positive) from least to most via less and more knowledge and pleasure, or a descent (if negative) from most to least via more and less ignorance and pain - the former options primary and the latter ones secondary.

 

19.  Likewise, since the essential form and content of music derives from its metaphysical basis in idealism, we may hold that form and content in music will always be essential, even as it undergoes proportionate modifications in keeping with an ascent (if positive) from least to most via less and more truth and joy, or a descent (if negative) from most to least via more and less falsity and woe - the former options primary and the latter ones secondary.

 

20.  Where the objective axes are concerned, the primary elements and/or elementinos will be hegemonic in both the scientific (elemental-particle) and political (molecular-particle) subdivisions, but subordinate in both the economic (molecular-wavicle) and religious (elemental-wavicle) subdivisions, as a predominating particle (coupled to a 'subponderating' wavicle) ratio is superseded by a 'subdominating' particle (coupled to a preponderating wavicle) one.

 

21.  Where, by contrast, the subjective axes are concerned, the primary elements and/or elementinos will be subordinate in both the scientific (elemental-particle) and political (molecular-particle) subdivisions, but hegemonic in both the economic (molecular-wavicle) and religious (elemental-wavicle) subdivisions, as a 'subponderating' wavicle (coupled to a predominating particle) ratio is superseded by a preponderating wavicle (coupled to a 'subdominating' particle) one.

 

22.  Hence, in space-time materialism, evil devolves negatively from a hegemonic to a subordinate primary status and evolves positively from a subordinate to a hegemonic secondary status, as it passes through scientific, political, economic, and religious subdivisions of noumenal objectivity.

 

23.  Hence, in volume-mass realism, goodness devolves negatively from a hegemonic to a subordinate primary status and evolves positively from a subordinate to a hegemonic secondary status, as it passes through scientific, political, economic, and religious subdivisions of phenomenal objectivity.

 

24.  Hence, in mass-volume naturalism, folly evolves positively from a subordinate to a hegemonic primary status and devolves negatively from a hegemonic to a subordinate secondary status, as it passes through scientific, political, economic, and religious subdivisions of phenomenal subjectivity.

 

25.  Hence, in time-space idealism, wisdom evolves positively from a subordinate to a hegemonic primary status and devolves negatively from a hegemonic to a subordinate secondary status, as it passes through scientific, political, economic, and religious subdivisions of noumenal subjectivity.

 

 

CYCLE TWENTY-TWO

 

1.   Since noumenal form and content are manifestations of noumenal power and glory, it follows that form will be an expression of power and content an expression of glory when both the form and the content are apparent, as in art and science, but that form will be an impression of power and content an impression of glory when both the form and the content are essential, as in music and religion.

 

2.   Likewise, since phenomenal form and content are manifestations of phenomenal power and glory, it follows that form will be a compression of power and content a compression of glory when both the form and the content are quantitative, as in literature and politics, but that form will be a depression of power and content a depression of glory when both the form and the content are qualitative, as in sculpture and economics.

 

3.   Hence we cannot claim that form is always the expression of power and content the expression of glory, but, rather, that the correlation between form and power on the one hand, and content and glory on the other will be expressive in metachemical contexts, compressive in chemical ones, depressive in physical contexts, and impressive in metaphysical ones.

 

4.   Since power can be either objective or subjective, it follows that the form of power will be objective when it has a vacuous precondition but subjective when its precondition is plenumous, thereby diverging and/or converging, in external and/or internal contexts, in either a barbed or a curved manner.

 

5.   Similarly, since glory can be either objective or subjective, it follows that the content of glory will be objective when it has a vacuous precondition but subjective when its precondition is plenumous, thereby diverging and/or converging, in external and/or internal contexts, in either a barbed or a curved manner.

 

6.   Form and content will always be objective when associated metachemically with fire and chemically with water, but subjective when associated physically with vegetation and metaphysically with air.

 

7.   Thus the form of objective power will always derive from a barbed response to a vacuous precondition, and thereby make possible for the content of objective glory a rectilinear as opposed to a curvilinear mould.

 

8.   By contrast, the form of subjective power will always derive from a curved response to a plenumous precondition, and thereby make possible for the content of subjective glory a curvilinear as opposed to a rectilinear mould.

 

9.   Neither squares nor circles are forms but absolutist manifestations of content that were made possible by formful preconditions in the respective guises of noumenal lines and curves.

 

10.  Hence squares presuppose metachemical lines and circles presuppose metaphysical curves, as noumenal content presupposes noumenal form as the noumenal power that lies behind noumenal glory.

 

11.  Neither rectangles nor ellipses (ovals) are forms but relativistic manifestations of content that were made possible by formful preconditions in the respective guises of phenomenal lines and curves.

 

12.  Hence rectangles presuppose chemical lines and ellipses presuppose physical curves, as phenomenal content presupposes phenomenal form as the phenomenal power that lies behind phenomenal glory.

 

13.  Metachemical lines may be ugly or beautiful, but only squares can be hateful or lovely, depending on the ratio of photon and/or photino particles to wavicles.

 

14.  Chemical lines may be weak or strong, but only rectangles can be humble or proud, depending on the ratio of electron and/or electrino (if conventional) or positron and/or positrino (if radical) particles to wavicles.

 

15.  Physical curves may be knowledgeable or ignorant, but only ellipses can be pleasurable or painful, depending on the ratio of neutron and/or neutrino (if conventional) or deuteron and/or deuterino (if radical) wavicles to particles.

 

16.  Metaphysical curves may be truthful or false, but only circles can be joyful or woeful, depending on the ratio of proton and/or protino wavicles to particles.

 

17.  As a definition of noumenally objective behaviour, evil can only exist in relation to metachemical lines and squares.

 

18.  As a definition of phenomenally objective behaviour, goodness can only exist in relation to chemical lines and rectangles.

 

19.  As a definition of phenomenally subjective behaviour, folly can only exist in relation to physical curves and ellipses.

 

20.  As a definition of noumenally subjective behaviour, wisdom can only exist in relation to metaphysical curves and circles.

 

21.  Since noumenal content is proportionate to noumenal form, there will always be a proportionate relationship (as much to as many) of squares to metachemical lines and of circles to metaphysical curves, no matter what the ratio of antiform and anticontent to form and content, or vice versa, may happen to be.

 

22.  Since phenomenal content is proportionate to phenomenal form, there will always be a proportionate relationship (as much to as many) of rectangles to chemical lines and of ellipses to physical curves, no matter what the ratio of antiform and anticontent to form and content, or vice versa, may happen to be.

 

 

CYCLE TWENTY-THREE

 

1.   Just as form precedes content, as the egg precedes the chicken, so does form condition content, since without a given type of form to mould itself to, there would be no proportionate content, and hence no resolution of form in content, of power in glory.

 

2.   Power justifies itself through the achievement of glory by the self which utilizes a given type of power to a glorious end, the end being proportionate to the type and degree of power utilized.

 

3.   It logically follows that an apparent power and/or form will lead to an apparent glory and/or content, just as an essential power and/or form will lead to an essential glory and/or content.

 

4.   Likewise, it logically follows that a quantitative power and/or form will lead to a quantitative glory and/or content, just as a qualitative power and/or form will lead to a qualitative glory and/or content.

 

5.   As I hope to have already established, the relationship of self to science, politics, economics, and religion is direct, since it implies a commitment, through disciplinary procedures, to power and glory, whereas the relationship, by contrast, of self to art, literature, sculpture, and music is indirect, since it implies a commitment, through disciplinary procedures, to form and content.

 

6.   Hence we may hold that a direct commitment by self to the disciplinary manifestations of any given element is commensurate with power and glory, whereas an indirect commitment by self to the disciplinary manifestations of any given element is commensurate with form and content.

 

7.   Thus we may further distinguish the 'natural' status of power leading to glory in relation to science, politics, economics, and religion ... from the 'cultural' status of form leading to content in relation to art, literature, sculpture, and music.

 

8.   Of course, the relationship of self to either power and glory, if direct, or to form and content, if indirect, will vary according to whichever self we are discussing, since there are in effect four selves, corresponding to each of the elements, from which to choose, viz. metachemical, chemical, physical, and metaphysical, two of which will be objective and two subjective, whilst each of these is further subdivisible into noumenal and phenomenal manifestations in both external ('once-born') and internal ('re-born') contexts, and either can be negative or positive, as we have seen.

 

9.   Hence the metachemical self, or soul, will operate within the noumenally objective parameters of space-time materialism, as that which mediates between metachemical power and/or form and metachemical glory and/or content to achieve an emotional end, whether directly, in relation to science, or indirectly, in relation to art.

 

10.  Likewise the chemical self, or id, will operate within the phenomenally objective parameters of volume-mass realism, as that which mediates between chemical power and/or form and chemical glory and/or content to achieve an instinctual end, whether directly, in relation to politics, or indirectly, in relation to literature.

 

11.  Conversely, the physical self, or ego, will operate within the phenomenally subjective parameters of mass-volume naturalism, as that which mediates between physical power and/or form and physical glory and/or content to achieve an intellectual end, whether directly, in relation to economics, or indirectly, in relation to sculpture.

 

12.  Finally, the metaphysical self, or mind, will operate within the noumenally subjective parameters of time-space idealism, as that which mediates between metaphysical power and/or form and metaphysical glory and/or content to achieve a spiritual end, whether directly, in relation to religion, or indirectly, in relation to music.

 

13.  Since self can be either negative or positive, its mediation between power and glory (if 'natural') or form and content (if 'cultural') will likewise be divisible between the negativity of antiself vis--vis antipower and/or antiform and antiglory and/or anticontent on the one hand, and the positivity of self vis--vis power and/or form and glory and/or content on the other hand.

 

14.  Hence space-time materialism affords us a noumenally objective negative/positive contrast between the antisoul in relation to metachemical antipower and/or antiform and metachemical antiglory and/or anticontent, and the soul in relation to metachemical power and/or form and metachemical glory and/or content.

 

15.  Likewise, volume-mass realism affords us a phenomenally objective negative/positive contrast between the anti-id in relation to chemical antipower and/or antiform and chemical antiglory and/or anticontent, and the id in relation to chemical power and/or form and chemical glory and/or content.

 

16.  Similarly, mass-volume naturalism affords us a phenomenally subjective negative/positive contrast between the anti-ego in relation to physical antipower and/or antiform and physical antiglory and/or anticontent, and the ego in relation to physical power and/or form and physical glory and/or content.

 

17.  Finally, time-space idealism affords us a noumenally subjective negative/positive contrast between the antimind in relation to metaphysical antipower and/or antiform and metaphysical antiglory and/or anticontent, and the mind in relation to metaphysical power and/or form and metaphysical glory and/or content.

 

18.  The antiselves devolve (descend) from most to least via more and less negative power and/or form and glory and/or content, while the selves evolve (ascend) from least to most via less and more positive power and/or form and glory and/or content, and this whether in relation to the primary elements (objective, particle-based) or to their secondary counterparts (subjective, wavicle-centred).

 

 

CYCLE TWENTY-FOUR

 

1.   The bodily self is clearly an amalgam of different selves, as is the mental equivalent of this, which is called the psyche.

 

2.   In fact, the psyche is a combination of soul, id, ego, and mind, and is thus atomically reflective of the elements, in that its constituent parts are drawn from fire, water, vegetation, and air.

 

3.   One can transcend the psyche, just as one can transcend the egocentric aspect of it through the cultivation of pure mind, or mind-at-large.

 

4.   One can also get behind the psyche, to the extent that the focal-point of psychological endeavour becomes the soul.

 

5.   For the soul is as much pre-psychic as the mind is post-psychic, although both can be co-opted to the psyche and made to serve in a subordinate relationship to the id and the ego, as and when worldly criteria are paramount.

 

6.   Both the id and the ego are dialectical, which is to say, they exist in a phenomenal and therefore relativistic relationship to each other on the basis of a feminine/masculine dichotomy, irrespective of the overall ratio in each case.

 

7.   One should distinguish the pre-dialectical materialism of the soul from the dialectical realism of the id, further distinguishing the dialectical naturalism of the ego from the post-dialectical idealism of the mind.

 

8.   Hence while the id and the ego tend to exist in a dialectical relationship to each other on the phenomenal planes of volume and mass, the more extreme components of the psyche tend to be either pre-dialectical or post-dialectical, as the case may be, since their correspondence to the noumenal planes of Space and Time is such that their reference-points will be rather more absolutist than relativistic, even when they are co-opted to the psychic totality of what amounts to a psychological pluralism.

 

9.   Thus the psyche plays host to a dialectical relativity which mirrors the phenomenality of the body as it alternates between the different elements which constitute its totality, whether with a phenomenal bias towards the id and the ego or with a noumenal bias towards the soul and the spirit or, indeed, with a paradoxical combination of the two biases, depending on the individual and the age and/or type of society to which he pertains.

 

10.  But the psyche is not the conscious mind, or spirit, any more than it is the ego by itself or the id or the soul by themselves, and therefore it is not that which is ultimate.  On the contrary, the psyche is what happens when all of these elements come together and are obliged to share the same atomic setting.

 

11.  Thus the psyche is something that can be made the subject and/or object of psychological investigation, but not of self-realization on an emotional, an instinctual, an intellectual, or a spiritual basis.

 

12.  For self-realization requires a specific self rather than the dialectical interplay of several selves, since it follows from a choice or decision to favour one self above another, rather than from the fact of the co-existence of different selves.

 

13.  Something that is pluralistic, like the psyche, would not decide to favour one self above another, least of all in relation to that self which, being spiritual, can transcend it, passing beyond the liberal parameters of what the psyche actually is.

 

14.  One can argue that the psyche has layers, from the emotional to the spiritual via the instinctual and the intellectual, but that doesn't make any one layer, say the spiritual, commensurate with the psyche.

 

15.  It is not the psyche which chooses to be emotional or instinctual or intellectual or spiritual, but the individual, either independently of or conditioned by society, whose decision in respect of each of these elements is crucial.

 

16.  Conscience does not arise in relation to the psyche but in relation to the decision of individuals and/or societies to pursue one mode of self-realization at the expense of another, and to adhere to it, come what may.

 

17.  Conscience is a sense of the rightness (if positive) of this as against the wrongness (if negative) of that, and has nothing whatsoever to do with the psyche, which, in any case, is effectively neutral in its capacity to embrace the totality of psychological options.

 

18.  Gender often compounds conscience by making what is right for one sex appear wrong to the other, and vice versa, since conscience can operate on either objective (female) or subjective (male) terms, with regard to fire and water on the one hand, or with equal regard to vegetation and air on the other hand.

 

19.  Only that person who has a principled commitment to the cultivation of any given self can experience conscience to the full, since conscience is vitiated by too liberal an adherence to psychic pluralism, which tends to retain an amoral balance, in due dialectical fashion, at the expense of immoral and/or moral extremes.

 

20.  Because both the id and the ego are dialectical, it follows that conscience will only arise to any significant extent in connection with either pre-dialectical or post-dialectical extremes, where it will take either an emotional or a spiritual form, depending on the type of noumenal self in question.

 

21.  Hence it is not the soul and the mind which are a threat to conscience, the sense of right from wrong, of duty, of moral necessity, so much as the amoral vitiation of conscience which occurs through the id and the ego, both of which are more deeply dialectical, and thus closely affiliated to psychic neutrality.

 

 

CYCLE TWENTY-FIVE

 

1.   If the soul can be likened to a square and the mind to a circle, then the id would be akin, in its phenomenal relativity, to a rectangle, and the ego to an ellipse.

 

2.   Both the square and the circle, being absolutist in their contrary noumenal integrities, are non-dialectical, whereas the rectangle and the ellipse have in common the parallel sides of their elongated planes, which constitute a basis for dialectical interaction after the manner of the id and the ego or, in bodily terms, woman and man.

 

3.   The oval is arguably a more radical ellipse that accords, in its more evenly distributed curvilinearity, with a deuteron and/or deuterino as opposed to a neutron and/or neutrino mode of egocentricity, after the manner of Catholic nonconformism.

 

4.   Something similar could be argued of elongated octagons as opposed to rectangles, where the feminine parallel to the more radical mode of masculine egocentricity is concerned, and it would accord with a positron and/or positrino as opposed to an electron and/or electrino mode of instinctuality, after the manner of Catholic humanism.

 

5.   Be that as it may, neither octagons nor ovals transcend the id or the ego the way both squares and circles do, which is why they remain affiliated, in dialectical interaction, to the psyche as objective and subjective manifestations, respectively, of phenomenal relativity.

 

6.   The transmutation of lines and curves into planes is commensurate with the attainment of content and the abandonment of form.

 

7.   Form leads to content as power to glory and, in Schopenhaurian terms, the will to representation, since that which has form or power by definition also has will, while that which has content or glory by definition also has representation, which is the linear fulfilment of a causative precondition.

 

8.   We may speak here of cause and effect, whether in connection with appearances, quantities, qualities, or essences, so that things can be said to proceed from one type of form or power or will to a correspondingly proportionate type of content or glory or representation.

 

9.   Contrary to Schopenhauer, the body is not necessarily, as representation, the objectification of the will, since it entirely depends on the type of will as to whether the representational outcome will be correspondingly objective or subjective.

 

10.  If the will is objective, and hence a factor of straight lines, then the representation will be proportionately objective, and thus a rectilinear factor of squares and/or rectangles.

 

11.  If, on the other hand, the will is subjective, and hence a factor of curved lines, then the representation will be proportionately subjective, and thus a curvilinear factor of circles and/or ellipses.

 

12.  Hence we may argue, contrary to Schopenhauer, that only that body which is the product of an objective will should be its objectification, and I hold that, contrary to appearances, such a body is more likely to be female, in stark contrast to the body which is, in male vein, the subjectification of a subjective precondition stemming not from a vacuum, as in the female case, but from a plenum, the subjective cause, through curves, of a curvilinear effect.

 

13.  There is also a more generalized sense in which the relationship between the Chinese Yin and Yang is one of cause and effect, since males are in no small degree the effects of a female cause, even if their childhood representation necessarily requires a closer elemental proximity to the mother in terms of squares and/or rectangles, as against circles and/or ellipses.

 

14.  For like can only issue from like, even when it has the appearance, superficially, of the opposite gender.  In actuality, it takes the male sex many years to grow towards vegetation and air at the expense of fire and water.

 

15.  The relation of state to church is also, in general terms, akin to that between Yin and Yang, female and male, especially since the Christian Church effectively begins only with the vegetative sacrifice of the Crucified Saviour as a precondition of spiritual redemption in the Holy Ghost - something as far removed from the female objectivity of the State, with its soul and/or id, as it is humanly possible to be.

 

16.  In fact, there is about the Church, when genuine and hence Catholic, an ego-to-mind, Son-to-Holy-Spirit order of subjective progression which contrasts, as effect to cause, with the soul-to-id, the 'Father'-to-'Mother', order of objective progression more characteristic, in its monarchic and parliamentary parallels, of the State, that female powerbase from which the glory of the Christian Church duly arose.

 

17.  However, Yin and Yang can also be narrowed down to the objective and/or subjective parameters of form and content that we were previously discussing, and it seems to me that not only power and glory or will and representation, but also work and play can be thought of in terms of cause and effect, straight lines and/or curved lines and planes of a rectilinear and/or curvilinear disposition.

 

18.  For it usually transpires that work leads to play, as will to representation, and that work, as a manifestation of will, is consequently a precondition, in one mode or another, of a correspondingly proportionate manifestation of representative play.

 

19.  Hence no play without work, just as, in correlative terms, we can argue that there would be no content without form, no glory without power, and no representation without will.

 

20.  It may even be - though this is purely a speculative suggestion on my part - that each definition of cause and effect can be ascribed a particular elemental bias, with, say, form and content being most suited to a metachemical bias by dint of a closer association, in either negative or positive terms, with ugliness and/or beauty and hatred and/or love, but power and glory being most suited to a metaphysical bias by dint of a closer association, in either negative or positive terms, with falsity and/or truth and woe and/or joy.

 

21.  Similarly, where the phenomenal options 'down below' are concerned, it may even be that will and representation are more suited to a chemical bias by dint of a closer association, in either negative or positive terms, with weakness and/or strength and humility and/or pride, but that work and play are more suited to a physical bias by dint of a closer association, in either negative or positive terms, with ignorance and/or knowledge and pain and/or pleasure.

 

22.  If so, then we would have to allow for a materialistic bias to form and content which smacked of an apparent definition of cause and effect, while reserving to power and glory an idealistic bias in keeping with an essential definition of cause and effect.

 

23.  Similarly, we would have to allow for a realistic bias to will and representation which smacked of a quantitative definition of cause and effect, while reserving to work and play a naturalistic bias in keeping with a qualitative definition of cause and effect.

 

24.  Since I have not argued in such terms before now, I shall not press the point, though I think it helps to bear the possibility of alternative biases in mind, so that more specific definitions of apparent, quantitative, qualitative, and essential modes of cause and effect can be elicited as and when circumstances allow.

 

25.  For when all's said and done, whether one thinks of cause and effect in terms of form and content, will and representation, work and play, or power and glory, the important thing to remember is that there are, in effect, four main types of cause and effect, each with a different element and each, so to speak, with a different axe to grind, be it emotional, instinctual, intellectual, or spiritual, in outer or inner, negative and/or positive modes, not all of which are equal and not all of which are equally desirable, despite the capacity of the body and the psyche to accommodate them on a more or less equalitarian, and hence amoral, basis.

 

 

CYCLE TWENTY-SIX

 

1.   Both the soul and the mind, as noumenal psychic entities, are by definition universal, since universality has an elemental basis in Space and Time, either of which, in whatever permutation, may serve to demonstrate universality as the condition of that which, being absolutist, is noumenal.

 

2.   By contrast, both the id and the ego, as phenomenal psychic entities, are by definition polyversal (multiversal), since polyversality has an elemental basis in Volume and Mass which, in whatever permutation, may serve to demonstrate polyversality as the condition of that which, being relativistic, is phenomenal.

 

3.   The noumenal, being absolutist, is universal, whereas the phenomenal, being relativistic, is polyversal, and thus a dialectical shortfall, through Volume and Mass, from the non-dialectical standing, through Space and Time, of universality.

 

4.   Whether the universality be evil and metachemical or wise and metaphysical, diabolic or divine, it will reflect the noumenal absolutism of both Space and Time.

 

5.   Whether the polyversality be good and chemical or foolish and physical, feminine or masculine, it will reflect the phenomenal relativity of both Volume and Mass.

 

6.   The evil universality of metachemistry, which is noumenally objective, extends, in impersonal terms, from the Cosmos to Venus and, in personal terms, from the eyes to the heart through space-time materialism.

 

7.   The wise universality of metaphysics, which is noumenally subjective, extends, in impersonal terms, from the Sun to Saturn and, in personal terms, from the ears to the lungs through time-space idealism.

 

8.   The good polyversality of chemistry, which is phenomenally objective, extends, in impersonal terms, from the moon to the oceans and, in personal terms, from the tongue to the womb through volume-mass realism.

 

9.   The foolish polyversality of physics, which is phenomenally subjective, extends, in impersonal terms, from the (vegetative) Earth to Mars and, in personal terms, from the phallus to the brain through mass-volume naturalism.

 

10.  Hence universality can be either impersonal or personal on both evil and wise axes of noumenal presentation.

 

11.  Hence polyversality can be either impersonal or personal on both good and foolish axes of phenomenal presentation.

 

12.  Both dresses and zippersuits, corresponding to objective (diabolic) and subjective (divine) manifestations, respectively, of noumenal absolutism, are universal.

 

13.  Both skirts and trousers, corresponding to objective (feminine) and subjective (masculine) manifestations, respectively, of phenomenal relativity, are polyversal.

 

14.  The female side of life, being objective, descends from metachemical universality to chemical polyversality, as from diabolic to feminine, dresses to skirts, while the male side of life, being subjective, ascends from physical polyversality to metaphysical universality, as from masculine to divine, trousers to zippersuits.

 

15.  Both metachemical universality and chemical polyversality, having reference to objective descent, appertain to the State, which is sartorially equivalent to dresses and skirts.

 

16.  Both physical polyversality and metaphysical universality, having reference to subjective ascent, appertain to the Church, which is sartorially equivalent to trousers and zippersuits.

 

17.  Hence not only is the State (when genuine) female as opposed to male, but it is an institution which descends from evil to good, as from materialism to realism, crime to punishment, in due objective fashion.

 

18.  Hence not only is the Church (when genuine) male as opposed to female, but it is an institution which ascends from folly to wisdom, as from naturalism to idealism, sin to grace, in due subjective vein.

 

19.  Like mankind in relation to womankind, the Church is secondary and the State ... primary, since it is the State which corresponds to the female side of life and the Church, by contrast, to that which, being subjective, is male.

 

20.  Although the Father and the Mother have both been co-opted to the Church, they are fundamentally symbolical of the State ... as it descends from metachemical universality to chemical polyversality, as from autocracy to democracy, monarchy to parliamentarianism.

 

21.  Only the Son and the Holy Ghost properly pertain to the Church, as that which begins in the denial, through the Crucified Christ, of vegetative sin and culminates in the affirmation of airy grace, passing beyond physical polyversality to the metaphysical universality of the saved, or resurrected, spirit.

 

22.  At least this should be the case wherever the Church is true and not bent backwards, by undue adherence to the Father and/or Mother, towards the State, wherein the glorification of state power is likely to replace religious glory.

 

23.  Every denomination has, to a greater or lesser extent, been compromised and even corrupted by the State and accordingly bent back, through the Bible, towards that which is fundamentally antithetical to metaphysical universality - namely the metachemical universality of such primitivistic concepts as the Creator and the paradoxical habit, in consequence, of worshipful deference towards the symbol(s) of cosmic power, effectively equivalent to that of state power.

 

24.  One does not 'get rid' of the State by abolishing the Church, since the result is likely to be a state absolutism, after the manner of Marxist communism or Hegelian nazism, and the self-glorification of the State is worse than the subversion of the Church through state power.

 

25.  On the contrary, one can only 'get rid' of the relativity of state and church via (my concept of) the Centre, which would change the terms of reference by which secular and religious institutions relate to each other, moving beyond what has increasingly become, in recent decades, a dichotomous relativity towards a relativistic absolutism, in which the state-like aspect of the Centre would be empowered to serve its church-like aspect, to the greater glory of religious progress.

 

26.  Thus instead of a state absolutism or, alternatively, of a state which reflects church teachings or, conversely, is moving away from such teachings towards an ever-more independent position, the coming to pass, democratically and officially, of the Centre, in which the Church is replaced by a triadic Beyond (as described elsewhere) and the State by the administrative aspect of the Centre as that which, bearing 'sins of the World', effectively pertains to a Christ-like sacrifice, the shouldering of political responsibilities, etc., in order that the People may be delivered from them and thereby saved to the triadic Beyond, commensurate, so I believe, with 'Kingdom Come'.

 

27.  Only thus can the relativity of state and church or, more usually these days, of church and state, effectively be overcome, as we move to a situation whereby, literally for the first time in history, religion can 'come clean' in fully subjective terms, served not by a state rooted in that which is contrary to such subjectivity and, in the nature of things, can only undermine it, but, on the contrary, by the secular arm of the Centre, dedicated, through Messianic resolve, to the advancement of its religious arm for ever more.

 

28.  All the People need do to secure for themselves the right to salvation from both their political 'sins of the World' and the obsolescent church structures rooted, through Biblical and in particular Old Testament fundamentalism, in worshipful deference to metachemical primacy ... is vote for religious sovereignty when the opportunity comes to pass; for only through such an ultimate sovereignty will there be an end to the World, or amoral lifestyle of mundane sovereignties, and a start made to the heavenly 'Kingdom' which lies beyond it, and on more profound and, hopefully, lasting terms than the grave.

 

 

CYCLE TWENTY-SEVEN

 

1.   Just as, in negative metachemistry, ugliness is the particle-based cause of hatred, so hatred is the wavicle-biased effect of ugliness.  And just as, in positive metachemistry, beauty is the particle-based cause of love, so love is the wavicle-biased effect of beauty.

 

2.   Just as, in negative chemistry, weakness is the particle-based cause of humility, so humility is the wavicle-biased effect of weakness.  And just as, in positive chemistry, strength is the particle-based cause of pride, so pride is the wavicle-biased effect of strength.

 

3.   Just as, in positive physics, knowledge is the particle-biased cause of pleasure, so pleasure is the wavicle-centred effect of knowledge.  And just as, in negative physics, ignorance is the particle-biased cause of pain, so pain is the wavicle-centred effect of ignorance.

 

4.   Just as, in positive metaphysics, truth is the particle-biased cause of joy, so joy is the wavicle-centred effect of truth.  And just as, in negative metaphysics, falsehood is the particle-biased cause of woe, so woe is the wavicle-centred effect of falsehood.

 

5.   The metachemistry of soul contrasts absolutely, in universal terms, with the metaphysics of mind (spirit), which stands at an airy remove from a fiery noumenal antithesis.

 

6.   The chemistry of the id contrasts relatively, in polyversal terms, with the physics of the ego, which stands at a vegetative remove from a watery phenomenal antithesis.

 

7.   The poet and the philosopher stand, as positive upper-class manifestations of 'the writer', at an absolutist remove from each other in what effectively amounts to a noumenal contrast between beauty and truth, love and joy.

 

8.   The antipoet and the antiphilosopher stand, as negative upper-class manifestations of 'the antiwriter', at an absolutist remove from each other in what effectively amounts to a noumenal contrast between ugliness and falsity, hatred and woe.

 

9.   The dramatist and the novelist stand, as positive lower-class manifestations of 'the writer', at a relativistic remove from each other in what amounts to a phenomenal contrast between strength and knowledge, pride and pleasure.

 

10.  The antidramatist and the antinovelist stand, as negative lower-class manifestations of 'the antiwriter', at a relativistic remove from each other in what amounts to a phenomenal contrast between weakness and ignorance, humility and pain.

 

11.  Whereas both the poet and the philosopher, being absolutist, are effectively universal manifestations of 'the writer', both the dramatist and the novelist, being relativistic, are polyversal manifestations thereof.

 

12.  Whereas both the antipoet and the antiphilosopher, being absolutist, are effectively universal manifestations of 'the antiwriter', both the antidramatist and the antinovelist, being relativistic, are polyversal manifestations thereof.

 

13.  The positivity of poets, dramatists, novelists, and philosophers is more likely to arise in a 're-born', or sensibly religious, age than in a 'once-born', or sensually secular, one, of which, on the contrary, the negativity of antipoets, antidramatists, antinovelists, and antiphilosophers will be more characteristic.

 

14.  Hence in an age when the State is breaking free of the Church, whether absolutely ('up above') or relatively ('down below'), as something effectively posterior rather than anterior to it, the 'cultural' corollary of this will be a plethora of antipoets, antidramatists, antinovelists, and antiphilosophers, depending, of course, on the type of post-Christian society.

 

15.  The twentieth century was of course such an age, and the balance of probability is that the chief purveyors of anti-literature were women, since they are more naturally or, rather, unnaturally negative than positive, on account of their objective dispositions in response to a vacuous precondition.

 

16.  Needless to say, all the Arts will be conditioned in a similar way by the drift towards and/or actual achievement of state hegemony of one kind or another, which is only possible on account of the liberation of the female from subjective constraints and the gradual feminization of society in the wake of the decline, if not collapse, of Christian values.

 

17.  One cannot of course put the clocks back, as they say, and I, for one, would be the last person on earth to want to do any such thing!  But one can certainly work, as an intelligent and spiritually-oriented man, for the supersession of the State by the Centre, and the coming to pass of a Superchristian New Order in which the positivity of the morally most desirable subjective values are once again paramount, only this time more so than ever before.

 

18.  The delusional theocracies of the Church arguably deserved to be overhauled, if not replaced, by the secular values of state-dominated modernity, but such values leave so much to be desired, from a morally subjective standpoint, that the sooner we move beyond them to the religious values of the Centre, the better it will be for, at any rate, the greater percentage of males, and not a few females.

 

 

CYCLE TWENTY-EIGHT

 

1.   Although I don't think all that highly of theocracy, I ought to allow for the possibility that, in light of the above antithesis concerning the distinction between universality and polyversality, the Father, so to speak, is less polytheistic than monotheistic in view of the association of this concept with Creator-based fundamentalism, as effectively applying to the space-time axis of metachemical materialism.

 

2.   It would seem, if my inspired hunch is correct, that the Mother is less monotheistic than polytheistic, since associated, through phenomenal objectivity, with volume-mass realism, the very thing which connotes, in its relativity, with a polyversal as opposed to universal status.

 

3.   Hence if there is a parallel between polyversality and polytheism, one should have no hesitation in equating the latter with a feminine bias, whilst allowing the absolutism of the Father and/or Creator to correlate, in due noumenal fashion, with monotheism, the universal antithesis to atheism or, more correctly, deism, as that which is more than simply against theism but in favour, through noumenal subjectivity, of a deistic, and thus properly deity-centred, alternative to it.

 

4.   Only in deism, it seems to me, does one approach the airy realm of genuine spirituality, whether negatively, through falsehood and woe, or positively, through truth and joy, and whether in outer or inner, 'once-born' or 're-born' contexts.

 

5.   Polytheism would therefore be reflective of a feminine bias and would stand on opposite sides of the gender fence from pantheism, or that which, though equally polyversal in its phenomenal relativity, is effectively masculine through a fleshy correlation with nature and all that is vegetative in one degree, shape, form or another.

 

6.   Hence we should contrast the universal antithesis of monotheism and deism with the polyversal antithesis, down below, of polytheism and pantheism, the former antithesis having noumenal reference to fire and air, the latter one having phenomenal reference to water and vegetation.

 

7.   Religion could therefore be concluded to descend, state-wise, from the monotheistic universality of the Father to the polytheistic polyversality of the Mother, and to ascend, by contrast, from the pantheistic polyversality of the Son to the deistic universality of the Holy Ghost, the latter of which would be atheistically 'beyond the (anthropomorphic) pale' of theism, and thus of everything which pertained, via theology and theocracy, to either metachemical, chemical, or physical shortfalls from metaphysics, or that which, being airy in one way or another, alone pertains to genuine religion.

 

8.   Only when religion ceases to be ruled by the Devil in monotheistic universality, or to be governed by woman in polytheistic polyversality, or to be represented by man in pantheistic polyversality ... will it be led by God in deistic universality, as, traditionally, in the Far East to one degree or another.

 

9.   Even in Christendom, it is logically inevitable and profoundly demonstrable that the Church becomes truer and/or less theistically bogus the farther east one goes, which is why Russian Orthodoxy remains the mode of Christianity which is closest, in vegetative 'rebirth', to Christ.

 

10.  The farther west one goes, on the other hand, the more bogus and the less 'true' the Church generally becomes, as the Father and the Mother tend to eclipse the Son and the Holy Ghost in due state-dominated fashion.

 

11.  This is especially true of certain Protestant churches of the American Far West, but it also applies, in no small degree, to the westernmost examples of Roman Catholicism, which, at times, are virtually indistinguishable from outright Marianism, and occasionally border on Creator-oriented fundamentalism.

 

12.  It is often said that we live in a fundamentalist age, and, certainly, one can believe that the extent to which objective values, partly conditioned by appearance-based media technology, have gained the upper hand, through materialism and realism, over subjective ones ... is proof enough of the difficulty confronting anyone who seeks to reverse the trend of female domination in favour of male liberation, through naturalism and especially idealism, from heathenistic norms.

 

13.  One of the principal reasons why fundamentalism, in particular, is always a force to be reckoned with ... is that men are beholden, especially when young, to the attractive power of female beauty, and often succumb to its allure by falling in love and experiencing what amounts to a positive manifestation of fundamentalist glory.

 

14.  Then, of course, something more humanistic, and hence realistic, often follows as a matter of familial course, as men succumb to the maternal ambitions of women and gravitate from the worship of beauty and love, through noumenal objectivity, to the worship of strength and pride through its phenomenal counterpart.

 

15.  In neither case is there anything demonstrably Christian, or male, but simply a surrender, by men, to that which, always and everywhere, is un-Christian in its Superheathen and Heathen femaleness, the male effectively reduced to a worship of state power even as it assumes a religious pose.

 

16.  Baudelaire wrote rather disparagingly, in his 'Intimate Journals', of man's relationship to woman being akin to that of a slave of a slave, and, frankly, one can see what he meant.  There isn't much to suggest that man is anything but an adjunct to female power when fundamentalist and humanist criteria considerably prevail, and even nonconformism leaves something to be desired when it is merely that which, in Anglican fashion, represents the male aspect of life in relation to, rather than in defiance of, the female aspect of it.

 

17.  Only that nonconformism which, being Catholic, encourages men to 'turn their back' on women and to look upon fleshy self-indulgence as 'sinful', thereby necessitating confession and repentance, stands closer to Christ, and hence to the Cross which is the necessary precondition, through vegetative self-denial, of spiritual self-affirmation, and thus of salvation not only from the World, but from that which diabolically rules over it in due fundamentalist fashion.

 

18.  Such Catholic nonconformism is less pantheistic, and hence nature-struck, than atheistic, or against the neutral mode of nonconformism, and it paves the way for the possibility of deistic transcendentalism in due course, the reward for those who can climb beyond naturalism to idealism, beyond sin to grace, and to the attainment, in consequence, of spiritual self-deliverance through God and Heaven, truth and joy, divine power and sublime glory.

 

19.  Such is the supernature of the superman, and the superman is one who has the capacity to live transcendentally aloof from the world of humanist and/or nonconformist relativity in what amounts, in its subjective universality, to a noumenal antithesis to fundamentalism.

 

20.  Only that man who was high to begin with, or who had the capacity to achieve the heights, either because he was an outer kind of transcendentalist (subman) or, alternatively, an exceptional kind of inner nonconformist (upper man) ... can become a superman, and thus a true 'Son of God', at home in the lofty realms of sensible metaphysics.

 

21.  Not everyone can become such, and that is why the generality must remain less than supermasculine, even as they achieve new manifestations of femininity and masculinity in what I would regard as the lower tiers of the triadic Beyond, come the introduction, through Social Transcendentalism, of 'Kingdom Come'.

 

 

CYCLE TWENTY-NINE

 

1.   To be above the ego of intellectual sensibility is to be above the 'I' who writes from a personal, and hence phenomenal, standpoint, the 'I' of the intellectual self which thinks, and thinks of itself in relation to others.

 

2.   The mind, or spiritual self, is not personal but, as I have attempted to prove, universal, in that it derives from the omnipresent medium of the air one breathes as a spiritual being, and can only exist or have experience of itself in relation to universality.

 

3.   Hence the mind, when true to itself, does not think, but is that which allows itself to be imposed upon and to remain receptive to such thoughts as the intellectual self, the inner knowledgeable self or sensible ego, may choose, in its phenomenal relativity, to think.

 

4.   The mind, when true to itself, is beyond the boundaries of thought, which issues, by contrast, from a personal self, the sensible ego, that is made possible by the prior existence of a brain from which, having first stored them there, the inner ego draws the concepts which it wishes to utilize for purposes of thought.

 

5.   When 'true' to itself, the ego thinks personally, about what concerns the individual whose self-identity derives, in no small degree, from his thoughts.

 

6.   It is also possible, as I have shown, to bend thought in a universal direction, as when one thinks about God or truth or spirit or other noumenal subjects, and such thought is quasi-universal, since it stems not from the ego, in personal vein, but from what we may call the superego, which is the type of idealistic intellect one would more identify with genuine philosophers than with, say, novelists or dramatists.

 

7.   Even the superego is fundamentally personal, in that it stems from and pertains to the brain of a specific individual, who uses it to think in a quasi-universal way.

 

8.   In this respect, prayer is also a manifestation of superegocentric quasi-universality, in that it orientates the religiously-thinking, or praying, individual towards that which is conceived, as God, etc., to be universal.

 

9.   One prays, as, say, a Christian, not to a personal being but to a universal one, the 'Risen Christ', whose spiritual essence is conceived as existing above the planes of phenomenal reference, in what amounts to a noumenal transcendentalism of extraterrestrial significance.

 

10.  Philosophical thought differs from prayer in that it is not a mode of religious praxis but a theory of life centred in the pursuit of wisdom, which therefore points the way towards the possibility of enhanced being.

 

11.  The philosopher's thought, if sufficiently universal in scope, may well pave the way for a higher order of religious praxis than has generally obtained within his culture-complex, as and when meditation is advocated over prayer as being more conducive to the attainment of a higher state of mind, one in which the mind is totally liberated from the last vestiges (superegocentric?) of ego, and accordingly achieves true spiritual redemption in that which, being omnipresent, is genuinely universal.

 

12.  Prayer never transcends the quasi-universality of superegocentric intellectuality, but meditation, as advocated by the genuine philosopher, has the effect of diminishing ego and enhancing spiritual self, as the mind surrenders, through the breath, to that which, as air, is truly universal.

 

13.  Only in the conscious breathing routines of transcendental meditation is the mind liberated from egocentric personality and/or superegocentric quasi-universality by the true universality of the air itself.

 

14.  The inner metaphysical self, or mind, uses both the lungs and the air to bring itself, first, to an accommodation with God and, then, to an accommodation with Heaven, passing from truth to joy in an unending cycle of metaphysical power and glory, divinity and sublimity, which is the salvation and resurrection of the spiritual self.

 

15.  The lungs are no more God than air is Heaven, but the inner metaphysical self achieves both God and Heaven for itself in proportion as it becomes increasingly committed, through transcendental meditation, to both the metaphysical will of the lungs and the metaphysical spirit of the air, in the interests of enhanced being.

 

16.  Mind that is truly spiritual, purged of everything but the breath that sustains it, is alone genuinely universal; for universality is a noumenal experience that transcends the phenomenality of the brain and its egocentric extrapolations.

 

17.  It is on a similar basis that, at its highest tier, the triadic Beyond of the Centre to which I subscribe would transcend the Church, raising the fulcrum of subjective experience from sin to grace, the genuine grace, that is, which flows from meditative praxis rather than the pseudo-grace of verbal absolution.

 

18.  It is this meditative praxis which, in its deistic airiness, is atheistic, and thus beyond any form of theistic allegiance, including, not least of all, the fundamentalist theism which makes a God out of fire and the Cosmos a fit object, in consequence, for worshipful idolatry!

 

19.  With genuine spirituality, there is no room for idolatrous objectivity in relation to fiery or watery or even vegetative shortfalls from true religion, but only room for the most intense subjectivity possible to human beings.

 

20.  Such an intense subjectivity would only be possible, it hardly needs emphasizing, to the Elect of Spirit, the higher men whom democratic institutions and world idolaters prefer to ostracize as an extremist threat to the phenomenal status quo.

 

21.  I can only add that, in the triadic Beyond, even people who were less than an Elect of Spirit would have a place for themselves, provided they recognized the ultimate legitimacy of spiritual nobility, and were prepared to defer to it during the course of their more terrestrial devotions.

 

22.  For the Centre which Social Transcendentalism wishes to democratically establish at the expense of state/church traditions would not be interested in extraterrestrial partisanship, but be pledged to the development of new terrestrial parameters for those for whom a New Purgatory of watery femininity and a New Earth of vegetative masculinity could only prove more relevant than a New Heaven of airy supermasculinity, religiously hegemonic as the latter would unquestionably have to be.

 

 

CYCLE THIRTY

 

1.   As I hope to have established, some cycles ago, that squares and circles are noumenal contents deriving from noumenal straight and curved lines, while rectangles and ellipses are their phenomenal counterparts with a similarly phenomenal derivation, we should have no difficulty in equating buildings with one or another of these options, according to their overall shape and height.

 

2.   Hence we should have to distinguish tall buildings of a square or a circular design from those buildings which betray, in their rectangular or elliptical constructions, a phenomenal as opposed to noumenal integrity.

 

3.   I would not hesitate, therefore, to equate skyscrapers or other tall buildings of a square design with the noumenal objectivity of metachemical materialism, reserving for circular skyscrapers an equation with the noumenal subjectivity of metaphysical idealism.

 

4.   Neither would I hesitate to equate squat buildings of a rectangular design with the phenomenal objectivity of chemical realism, reserving for elliptical buildings an equation with the phenomenal subjectivity of physical naturalism.

 

5.   We should now have a basis from which to evaluate buildings not only according to whether they conform to a noumenal or a phenomenal status, but, in addition, to the alpha or omega of each, the metachemical no less antithetical to the metaphysical where towering buildings are concerned ... than the chemical to the physical wherever squat buildings prevail.

 

6.   Hence we can distinguish those buildings which, in their rectilinear designs, correspond to the objective, and hence female, side of life from those corresponding, in their curvilinear designs, to its subjective, and hence male, side.

 

7.   The square towering building is no less behind the generality of rectangular buildings ... than the circular towering building stands beyond the generality of elliptical ones.

 

8.   Which is equivalent to saying, in elemental terms, that whereas tall, square buildings correspond to fire, their rectangular counterparts 'down below' correspond to water - the former effectively diabolic and the latter feminine.

 

9.   Likewise, we would have to maintain that whereas elliptical buildings correspond to vegetation, their circular counterparts 'up above' correspond to air - the former effectively masculine and the latter divine.

 

10.  Hence we have a metachemical/chemical distinction between the objective absolutism of square buildings and the objective relativity of rectangular buildings, as between materialism and realism, evil and good.

 

11.  Hence we have a physical/metaphysical distinction between the subjective relativity of elliptical buildings and the subjective absolutism of circular ones, as between naturalism and idealism, folly and wisdom.

 

12.  Clearly, it makes a lot of difference which kind of architectural design a building conforms to, since the linear content to which a structure most pertains will determine whether it can be regarded as paralleling fire, water, vegetation, or air, with all due considerations as to its basic gender, ideological, moral, or cultural significance.

 

13.  Broadly, the drift from rectangular to square architectural designs is equivalent to a progression or, rather, regression from objective towns to objective cities, as from phenomenal extensiveness to noumenal extensiveness, good objectivity to evil objectivity within female parameters.

 

14.  Equally, the drift from elliptical to circular architectural designs is equivalent to a progression from subjective towns to subjective cities, as from phenomenal intensiveness to noumenal intensiveness, foolish subjectivity to wise subjectivity within male parameters.

 

15.  Towns are always broadly phenomenal and cities, by contrast, largely noumenal, even when, as above, we distinguish the objective from the subjective on the basis of a rectilinear/curvilinear divide.

 

16.  Villages and communes (country houses, castles, etc.) are rather more the traditional or ancient parallel to towns and cities than their subjective counterparts.

 

17.  There are certain towns and cities which are architecturally androgynous, combining a variety of objective and subjective features within themselves, whilst other towns and cities maintain a bias towards either the objective or the subjective types of architecture, depending on whether they have been conditioned by female or by male criteria overall.

 

18.  It is inconceivable, in this world, that only one type of architectural style should prevail in any given town or city, considering that style is to some extent conditioned by function, as well as by cultural and/or ethnic factors.

 

19.  The triadic Beyond to which I subscribe as a self-proclaimed Messiah would not be partial to only one type of architectural style, even if the emphasis would be on circular towers in conformity with Centrist criteria, as that which is deemed most suitable to the cultivation of noumenal subjectivity.

 

20.  For the circular tower is commensurate with metaphysical idealism, and hence with the leadership, through noumenal subjectivity, of spiritual being.

 

21.  Yet that would not exclude the probability, lower down the triadic hierarchy, of elliptical and rectangular styles of building, where naturalism and realism would have their masculine and feminine places, albeit in deferential acknowledgement of the hegemonic standing of metaphysical idealism.

 

22.  Logically, the writer, unlike the artist, is likely to be more 'at home' in a rectangular building than in a square one, while the musician, unlike the sculptor, is likely to be more 'at home' in a circular building than in an elliptical one.

 

23.  It could be argued that the best type of building for a philosopher to work in would be, if not a circular tower (more suited to the metaphysical per se?), then at least a rectangular building that deferred to the circular in some significant way, thereby effectively bending water towards air.

 

24.  The writer who is accused of living in an 'ivory tower' at the expense of everyday life is obviously at fault from a strictly rectangular, and hence objective, point of view, since writing, with its fluidal means traditionally, is fundamentally a feminine art form; but when he is a genuine philosopher, then the 'bovaryization' of writing towards music, of water towards air, is only to be expected, and requires an 'ivory-tower' existence if the necessary metaphysical or, more literally, quasi-metaphysical elevation over the common phenomenal run of things is to be achieved.

 

25.  Hence, although used in a metaphorical way, the term 'ivory tower' connotes with that which is above and beyond the World, and that is precisely what the philosopher, even if not literally secreted in a circular tower, should be, insofar as it is his duty to climb beyond the mundane realm of terrestrial endeavour in his pursuit of wisdom, which is, of course, an extraterrestrial, or airy, virtue.

 

26.  Only the philosopher who works at an 'ivory-tower' remove from the common run ... is of any consequence to philosophy; for the pursuit of wisdom, of enhanced being through essence, cannot be carried out 'on the ground', but demands a noumenal elevation above the phenomenal relativity of polyversal literature, meaning, principally, novels and plays.

 

27.  In this respect, the philosopher stands at the opposite extreme from the poet, who should also be above 'the crowd', if from an anterior, and effectively fundamentalist, rather than from a posterior, and transcendentalist, point of view.

 

 

CYCLE THIRTY-ONE

 

1.   The Biblical proverb about taking the beam out of one's own eye before addressing the mote in that of another's ... would seem to be directed, in effect, at those who are more objective than subjective in their sensual and/or sensible orientations, and more inclined, in consequence, to have a beam than a mote (of immorality) in their eye.

 

2.   In general terms, this would apply to females to a greater extent than to males, since the former are by (un)nature more disposed, through fire and water, to the objective aspects of life than the latter, whose intrinsic bias towards vegetation and air makes them correspondingly more subjective, and hence less disposed, one would imagine, to the cultivation of a beam than a mote (of immorality).

 

3.   Yet there are peoples who are more female, overall, than male in their ideological, ethical, or other orientations, and one would have to say that the chances of such peoples cultivating a beam rather than a mote in their eye must be pretty high, in fact so high as to effectively preclude them from being able to acknowledge the mote in the eye of their principal critics or adversaries by dint of the moral blindness to which they have been brought, compliments of the beam (of immorality) to which they unreflectively and uncritically subscribe in consequence of too objective a disposition.

 

4.   Undoubtedly the British are such a people, as, to an even greater extent, are the Americans, whose beam is somewhat larger, stronger, and more morally damaging, in view of their greater bias towards noumenal objectivity, as symbolized by the stars on their flag, and superheathen disposition, in consequence, to glorify the stellar aspect of the Cosmos in due superfeminine fashion.

 

5.   There is even less subjective reflectivity where America is concerned than in Britain, and one can only conclude that their ability to identify the mote in the eye of their principal detractors will be correspondingly impaired by the degree to which the beam of noumenal objectivity is given free rein to do its damnedest.

 

6.   The dominant trend of Western civilization in recent centuries has been to regress from water to fire, as from chemical realism to metachemical materialism, feminine good to diabolic evil, giving to doing, and no greater paradigm for this trend exists than that of Anglo-American civilization, the latter-day heathenistic equivalent of Graeco-Roman civilization, with America taking over from Britain the so-called leadership of the Western world.

 

7.   For all its democratic ideals and show of religious piety, America remains fundamentally a barbarous country which worships fire through doing, where Britain, its more civilized counterpart, worshipped - and to some extent still worships - water through giving.

 

8.   One of the most conspicuous examples of the extent to which America worships fire through doing or, rather, acting ... is in the so-called American Dream, which is effectively that of the film industry, based in Hollywood, and its relentless commitment to a plethora of ever-more explosive and/or expressive movies.

 

9.   One cannot pretend that America could be substantially different than it is, since, like any country on earth, America is partly conditioned by climatic and environmental factors which determine its lifestyle, so to speak.

 

10.  The stripes on the American flag strike me as symbolizing, in their red horizontality, a hot or fiery water, such that is the consequence, in no small degree, of the starry cosmos which reigns over it as its metachemical precondition - fire leading to water, as the Devil to woman.

 

11.  Despite its macho pretensions, America is really more female than Britain, in that its objectivity tends to take a predominantly noumenal rather than phenomenal turn, in keeping with the superheathen reign of brightness, symbolized by the Statue of Liberty and other such superfeminine icons, at the expense of the heathen darkness of watery femininity, a darkness more 'Old World' and, in particular, English than American.

 

12.  Yet starry brightness corresponds to the evil of noumenal objectivity, and is thus a metachemical regression from the watery darkness of phenomenal objectivity, corresponding, by contrast, to chemical goodness.

 

13.  Where the objectivity of evil and good are concerned, it is America which stands closest to the one and Britain to the other, though both are somewhat short, in their female bias, of folly and wisdom, and thus of the possibility not of brightness and darkness, diabolic and feminine, but of heaviness and lightness, masculine and divine.

 

14.  For a drift from masculine folly to divine wisdom, taking to being, if in sensual as opposed to sensible terms overall, one would have to switch one's attention from Britain and North America to, say, Spain and South America, since the latter continent is less given to the brightness of North American noumenal objectivity than to the lightness of South American noumenal subjectivity, including certain dances (tango, salsa, lambada) which typify the Latin alternative, in gravity-defying motions, to the horn-wielding glitter of American Jazz.

 

15.  Thus if Britain, in its watery femininity, its speech-oriented parliamentarianism, led to the fieriness of North America, it cannot be denied that Spain, in its vegetative masculinity, its bull-slaying virility, led to the airiness of South America where, due to a variety of conditioning factors, the male aspect of life became more deeply entrenched than ever it was in Europe, and heaviness was duly eclipsed by lightness to an extent comparable to that by which darkness was eclipsed by brightness in North America.

 

16.  The statue of Christ the Redeemer atop the Corcovado Mountain in Rio de Janeiro is the South American retort to the presence of the Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York, and in this sculptural contrast is to be found the antithetical dispositions of the two continents for brightness and lightness, evil and wisdom, fire and air.

 

17.  Such an antithesis would of course exist in a rather more phenomenal basis in Europe between the darkness of Britain and the heaviness of Spain, since it was from Europe that both the feminine and the masculine aspects of life gravitated to their respective noumenal resolutions in the 'New World'.

 

18.  Some, in their ignorance, make the mistake of identifying darkness with evil and brightness with good, but, in actuality, nothing could be more contrary to the facticity of the matter.

 

19.  Darkness is, in effect, objectively preferable to brightness, as woman to the Devil or purgatory to Hell or, in simple elemental terms, water to fire, but it is the brightness which, principally through America, reigns over the contemporary world and delusively hypes itself up as something morally desirable.

 

20.  In actuality, neither goodness and evil nor water and fire are moral but equally or, rather, unequally immoral: the one phenomenally so, and the other in relation to a noumenal manifestation of objectivity.

 

21.  In sartorial terms, one doesn't get beyond the dress or the skirt where evil and good are concerned, since one remains confined to female parameters in due objective fashion.

 

22.  Goodness punishes crime, while crime 'flies in the face' of goodness as something that is demonstrably evil.  In neither case have we entered the male realm of sin and grace, folly and wisdom, trousers and zippersuits, in due subjective vein.  We have remained fixed, in effect, at an Anglo-American, as opposed to a Latin-American, level of civilization, where brightness and darkness, fire and water, are adjudged to be the correct yardstick by which truth, morality, God, etc., should be measured.

 

23.  Nothing, of course, could be further from the case, but, then, each civilization works within certain parameters and seeks either to extend those parameters at the expense of other civilizations or, if subjective, to defend itself from the subversive encroachments or threats of irrelevant criteria as best it can.

 

24.  We are of course generalizing, in each case, where both noumenal (New World) and phenomenal (Old World) alternatives are concerned, but such generalizations are far from fanciful, since drawn from specific facts which present themselves to us in the course of their historical unfolding.

 

25.  Nothing is ever completely 'cut and dried', as they say, but neither are logically sustainable generalizations without philosophical significance in enabling us to better understand the world in which we live, whether as practically-minded participants or as theoretically-minded elucidators and ... philosophers.

 

 

CYCLE THIRTY-TWO

 

1.   That which merely exists rather than lives may be susceptible to appearance or quantity or quality or essence, in due elemental fashion, but it will not be capable of doing or giving or taking or being.

 

2.   Conversely that which lives rather than simply exists ... will be capable of doing or giving or taking or being by dint of the fact that it utilizes appearance or quantity or quality or essence, as the case may be, to that end.

 

3.   Elements exist but do not live, in the sense of having the capacity to directly experience, through sentience, a range of emotions, sensations, thoughts, or feelings.

 

4.   Hence although fire, water, vegetation, and air most certainly exist, they do not experience emotions, sensations, thoughts, or feelings in the manner of a living person, whose sentience exposes him to a variety of psychic states having their origin in some subatomic equivalent of the basic elements.

 

5.   A human being is thus more than merely existential, even if, as a composite of elemental factors, he has an existential dimension.  On the contrary, he is principally experiential, and it is through his varied experiences of and in life that he actually lives.

 

6.   The experiential transcendence of existence by human beings is what makes for love or pride or pleasure or joy or, indeed, for their negative counterparts in hatred, humility, pain, and woe.

 

7.   It is also what makes, in a broader sense, for science and politics and economics and, above all, religion, which transcend art and literature and sculpture and music in much the same way that love transcends beauty or pride transcends strength or pleasure transcends knowledge or joy transcends truth.

 

8.   Even the hatred of antiscience or the humiliation of antipolitics or the pain of anti-economics or the woe of antireligion transcends the ugliness of anti-art or the weakness of anti-literature or the ignorance of antisculpture or the falsity of antimusic in such experiential terms, leaving the anti-arts as the same sort of testimony to anti-existence, as their positive counterparts to the testimony of existence.

 

9.   The Arts indubitably exist, but they do not experience doing or giving or taking or being in the manner of a sentient creature, even if a degree of their creators' experience of certain emotions or sensations or thoughts or feelings is conveyed, directly or indirectly, via them.

 

10.  In this respect, the Arts will always be a poor substitute for the experience of doing (through emotions) or giving (through sensations) or taking (through thoughts) or being (through feelings) by those who actually live in a scientific or a political or an economic or a religious manner, as the case may be.

 

11.  The significance of the Arts is not as a substitute for life but as an existential guide to its experiential fulfilment through one or another mode of direct experience, whether in relation to Hell, Purgatory, the Earth, Heaven or, indeed, to any of their negative counterparts.

 

12.  In this respect, the philosopher, as a positive type of the literary artist, is an existential guide to the experience of being through essence, since his penchant for wisdom makes the pursuit of joy through truth of paramount theoretical concern to him.

 

13.  Air is not only the essential element but the mystical element, on account of its hidden nature as that which is not detectable to the eye in the manner of fire, water, and vegetation.

 

14.  Air is thus not only mystical but supernatural and extraterrestrial, in its noumenally subjective elevation above the phenomenal mode of elemental subjectivity, viz. vegetation.

 

15.  Air is omnipresent and therefore universal, but nowhere to be seen on account of its essential nature, its supernature, as that which rises, extraterrestrially, above the vegetative heaviness of the earth on the basis, necessarily comparative, of gravity-defying lightness.

 

16.  Likewise the self which utilizes air to a beingful end, the inner metaphysical mind, is hidden from view and only achieves superconscious awareness of itself through joy, which is its experiential fulfilment and transcendence of conscious existence.

 

17.  For the mind that is sensibly conscious of itself through aware feeling is existential and therefore spiritual, but the mind that achieves a joyful transcendence of such consciousness is experiential and thus truly heavenly, the difference, one might say, between the existence of being through essence, which is truth, and the experience of being in and as -though at one with - essence, which is joy, if not bliss.

 

 

CYCLE THIRTY-THREE

 

1.   The spiritual self, or mind, has no knowledge of itself but only consciousness of itself, through aware feeling, as a spiritual entity.

 

2.   Knowledge, on the contrary, is what applies to the ego, and, in sensibility, knowledge is always intellectual.

 

3.   In sensuality, on the other hand, knowledge is always carnal, since associated, through outer ego, with the phallus - and hence the flesh - as opposed to the brain.

 

4.   Knowledge can of course be negative or positive, depending on whether achieved in connection with the anti-ego or the ego, in both external and internal, sensual and sensible contexts.

 

5.   So-called spiritual knowledge is really knowledge of the spirit or of spiritual issues from the standpoint of the superego, as and when intellectuality takes a specifically philosophical turn in connection with metaphysical thought.

 

6.   Such knowledge of the spirit is therefore an extreme manifestation of egocentricity, and is effectively a gnostical shortfall from that which, having direct reference to spiritual self-consciousness, is mystical.

 

7.   Hence the gnostical stands to the mystical as vegetation to air, whether in sensibility, as above, or in sensuality, where the 'gnosis', or knowledge, is likely to be rather more carnal than intellectual, in keeping with its phallic nature.

 

8.   Unlike the vegetative Gnostic, the airy Mystic does not have knowledge of self (ego) but consciousness (aware feeling) of self (mind), whether subconsciously in relation to metaphysical sensuality or superconsciously in relation to metaphysical sensibility - the former having associations with the ears and the latter with the lungs.

 

9.   Whereas knowledge of self is carnal and/or intellectual, depending on the mode of egocentricity, consciousness of self is aural and/or spiritual, depending on the mode of 'psychocentricity'.

 

10.  The Gnostic never really transcends his masculinity, whereas the Mystic will be either submasculine in sensuality or supermasculine in sensibility, either of which is comparatively divine.

 

11.  Mysticism takes over from gnosticism at that point where metaphysical being ensues upon physical taking, as and when one ceases to cogitate and/or pray, but simply meditates instead.

 

12.  It is difficult to conceive of antitheses to mysticism and gnosticism in view of the extent to which each term has been twisted away, in Western civilization, from its rightful ascription, but such antitheses are more likely, being objective, to have either magic(al) or tragic(al) associations, in keeping with their female (un)nature.

 

13.  Certainly I would not hesitate to contend that, on the basis of their respective objective dispositions, there is something magic about the Devil and, by contrast, tragic about woman, the latter corresponding to a quantitative 'fall' from an apparent precondition, as in the case of water from fire, or chemistry from metachemistry.

 

14.  Magic has associations not with the spirit but with the soul, with an emotional response to metachemical stimuli, and we may believe that tragedy ensues upon magic when instinctual responses to chemical stimuli bring the id into conflict with the soul and oblige it to enact the goodness of punishment at the soul's (evil) expense.

 

15.  Thus the tragedy for woman is that she is fated to come into punishing conflict with the magic of the soul, once she abandons the 'garden' of metachemical innocence for the chemical responsibilities of the World.

 

16.  Such responsibilities, being maternal, ensure that magic loses its metachemical innocence and becomes associated, through instinctual goodness, with all that is emotionally unacceptable from a chemical, and hence feminine, angle.

 

17.  The tragedy for woman is that once she has lost her emotional innocence on the Cupidian axis of space-time metachemistry, she can never get it back, but is fated to punish both in herself and especially in others (offspring) that which runs contrary to the responsible will of instinctual goodness.

 

18.  Deprived of magic, life becomes tragic for those women who have 'fallen' from the diabolic heights of metachemical innocence to the feminine depths of chemical responsibility.

 

19.  The skirt has replaced the dress, and never again can the dress be worn with the same metachemical insouciance as was formerly the case, before the darkness of instinctual responsibility ensued upon the brightness of emotional freedom.

 

20.  Woman is fated to plumb the chemical depths, for she cannot fulfil her instinctual needs by remaining metachemically aloof from the World, like a magician.  Henceforward that which was innocent becomes vulnerable, through guilt, to the stigma of criminal irrelevance and the onerous responsibility of punishment.

 

21.  If to turn against that which is higher and which one had emotional experience of is tragic, then to hype up, for personal reasons, what is lower ... must be comic, and such, it would seem, is the case where the generality of relationships between women and men are concerned, since the latter only enter into relationships with the former out of folly and a corresponding lack of wisdom, and women instinctively know this!

 

22.  One might say that it is the phallic folly of the average man's sensual relationship to the opposite sex which affords women comic relief from their tragic renunciation of soul.

 

23.  A man does not find himself anywhere near as comic as he appears to his woman at those times when the enormity of his phallic folly comes into conflict with the tragedy of her renunciation of soul.

 

24.  Sin is accordingly comic, but not from the sinner's standpoint, nor from the standpoint of grace, but only from the point of view of that woman whose tragic lot it is to punish what she experientially knows, in her heart of hearts, to be greater than the World, and who is afforded comic relief by the man's renunciation or, more likely, denunciation of wisdom.

 

 

CYCLE THIRTY-FOUR

 

1.   Just as drama, the most feminine because speech-oriented and therefore watery of literary genres, alternates between tragedy and comedy, so women do likewise - at least when they are recognizably feminine, and no longer actively diabolic.

 

2.   Women's tragic renunciation of the Devil makes them more susceptible to regarding as comical that which impinges upon them from a masculine standpoint, as and when the sinful folly of men is brought into sharp relief with their own punishing goodness, and exposed for what it is.

 

3.   That which is comical is so from an objective point of view, and contrasts with the subjectivity of humour, which is rather more masculine than feminine.

 

4.   Christ is reputed never to have laughed, and one can believe that He would not have laughed at or been amused by other people, since too subjective in his gnostical rejection of the 'once-born' World to be susceptible to the feminine bias for comedy, for finding comic that which is contrary to itself and intrinsically sinful.

 

5.   Neither is that which 'flies in the face' of comedy necessarily tragic, since tragedy is behind rather than beyond comedy.  Rather, it is phallic, and thus a precondition of gnosticism.

 

6.   The tragic/comic relativity of phenomenal objectivity has to be weighed against the phallic/gnostic relativity of phenomenal subjectivity, as one distinguishes the chemical polyversality of feminine women, both upper and lower, from the physical polyversality of lower- and upper-masculine men, each of which is beneath the metachemical universality of diabolic superwomen-to-subwomen and the metaphysical universality of divine submen-to-supermen.

 

7.   Magic is no less behind the tragic/comic relativity of phenomenal objectivity ... than mysticism beyond the phallic/gnostic relativity of phenomenal subjectivity.

 

8.   Just as magic pertains to the noumenally objective absolutism of fire, so that which is mystic pertains to the noumenally subjective absolutism of air, both of which, being universal, are above the planes of phenomenal polyversality.

 

9.   From magical appearances to mystical essences via tragic/comic quantities and phallic/gnostic qualities in due process of objective devolution on the one hand, as from fire to water, and of subjective evolution on the other hand, as from vegetation to air.

 

10.  The Bible says something to the effect of 'God so loving the world that He gave His only begotten Son', but, in actuality, God has nothing whatsoever to do with loving or even hating the world.  On the contrary, God is too subjective an entity to be concerned - if only indirectly - with anything but woe (if negative) or joy (if positive), and, in any case, is a factor in that which saves one from the world or, rather, World (with a capital 'W' to denote its religious connotation), leading one beyond it in due metaphysical vein.

 

11.  That which loves the world (if positive) or hates the world (if negative) will have more to do with the Devil than ever it or, rather, she has to do with God, since it is the metachemical self which rules over the world through diabolic power (the Devil) and infernal glory (Hell), whether in outer or inner terms, and whether, as I have indicated, in relation to negative or to positive manifestations of metachemical selfhood.

 

12.  It is only because the Diabolic and the Divine are confounded with one another in the Bible-dominated delusions of Western civilization that that which is actually magical becomes erroneously identified with the mystical, to the detriment of true mysticism.

 

13.  It is also important to realize that neither the Devil nor Hell exist except in relation to the metachemical self, the noumenally objective self of superheathen brightness, which creates both the Devil and Hell for itself as it attains to metachemical power and glory, whether negatively in relation to ugliness and hatred or positively in relation to beauty and love, in both outer and inner contexts.

 

14.  In fact, the terms 'Devil' and 'Hell' are simply religious definitions of metachemical power and glory, the diabolic power and infernal glory which the metachemical self, affiliated to space-time materialism, avails of in due superfeminine and/or subfeminine fashion for purposes of metachemical self-realization.

 

15.  First there is the superfeminine (in the outer context of spatial space) and/or the subfeminine (in the inner context of repetitive time), and then the utilization of super-unnatural and/or sub-unnatural means towards a super-unconscious and/or sub-unconscious end, the infernal glory which issues from a diabolic power being utilized by an evil self.

 

16.  Likewise, the terms 'God' and 'Heaven' are simply religious definitions of metaphysical power and glory, the divine power and the sublime glory which the metaphysical self, affiliated to time-space idealism, avails of in due submasculine and/or supermasculine vein for purposes of metaphysical self-realization.

 

17.  First there is the submasculine (in the outer context of sequential time) and/or the supermasculine (in the inner context of spaced space), and then the utilization of subnatural and/or supernatural means towards a subconscious and/or superconscious end, the sublime glory which arises from a divine power being utilized by a wise self.

 

18.  What applies positively to each of the above-mentioned universal selves, whether magical or mystical, metachemical or metaphysical, applies just as much to their negative counterparts, where one would have to distinguish the antiselves of a female (if objective) or a male (if subjective) disposition from their respective antipowers and antiglories, thereby giving rise to the religious corollaries of Antidevils and Antihells in relation to ugliness and hatred, and of Antigods and Antiheavens in relation to falsity and woe, either of which can be outer (and 'once born') or inner (and 're-born').

 

19.  Whatever the case, Gods and Heavens, Devils and Hells, do not exist in science, as cosmic noumena and/or phenomena, but solely in relation to the personal self and/or antiself, which has latched-on to an organ of sensuality and/or sensibility and utilized it for purposes of self-realization, thereby erecting divine and sublime or diabolic and infernal parameters for itself.

 

20.  Breathing is not a divine attribute, but it becomes divine when (super)consciously indulged in by the inner metaphysical self, the supermasculine mind, which thereby creates both God and Heaven for itself during the course of its meditating.

 

21.  Likewise seeing is not a diabolic attribute, but it becomes diabolic when (super)unconsciously or, rather, super-emotionally indulged in by the outer metachemical self, the superfeminine soul, which thereby creates both the Devil and Hell for itself during the course of its looking.

 

22.  Hence without the inner metaphysical self, the supermasculine mind, lungs are no more God than air is Heaven, but simply that which can be turned to divine or sublime account through superconscious intent, as spiritual truth leads to heavenly joy.

 

23.  Hence without the outer metachemical self, the superfeminine soul, the eyes are no more the Devil than light is Hell, but simply that which can be turned to diabolic or infernal account through super-unconscious or, rather, super-emotional intent, as soulful beauty leads to hellish love.

 

24.  Such it is for the outer and inner extremes in Space of metachemical and metaphysical life, and such it is for their inner and outer counterparts in Time also, since it is the subfeminine soul in relation to heart and blood, and the submasculine mind in relation to ears and sound waves ... which create their respective powers and glories, whether positively or negatively, as selves or antiselves.

 

 

CYCLE THIRTY-FIVE

 

1.   Since the outer metachemical self, the sensual soul, is superfeminine, it is such in relation to the super-unnature (spatial space) of the eyes and the super-unconsciousness (optical emotions) of the light.

 

2.   Since the inner metachemical self, the sensible soul, is subfeminine, it is such in relation to the sub-unnature (repetitive time) of the heart and the sub-unconsciousness (soulful emotions) of the blood.

 

3.   Since the outer chemical self, the sensual id, is upper feminine, it is such in relation to the upper unnature (volumetric volume) of the tongue and the upper unconsciousness (verbal sensations) of saliva.

 

4.   Since the inner chemical self, the sensible id, is lower feminine, it is such in relation to the lower unnature (massed mass) of the womb and the lower unconsciousness (instinctual sensations) of the placenta.

 

5.   Since the outer physical self, the sensual ego, is lower masculine, it is such in relation to the lower nature (massive mass) of the phallus and the lower consciousness (carnal knowledge) of orgasm.

 

6.   Since the inner physical self, the sensible ego, is upper masculine, it is such in relation to the upper nature (voluminous volume) of the brain and the upper consciousness (intellectual knowledge) of thought.

 

7.   Since the outer metaphysical self, the sensual mind, is submasculine, it is such in relation to the subnature (sequential time) of the ears and the subconsciousness (aural feeling) of sound.

 

8.   Since the inner metaphysical self, the sensible mind, is supermasculine, it is such in relation to the supernature (spaced space) of the lungs and the superconsciousness (spiritual feeling) of the breath.

 

9.   The sensible mind takes air and transforms it, via the breath, into spirit, with which it is superconsciously aware of itself as a spiritual entity capable of experiencing the utmost joy, that ultimate feeling called bliss.

 

10.  The superconscious, or spiritual mind, differs from the conscious mind of the intellectual ego as superman from man, or Heaven from the Earth, or bliss from pleasure, or truth from knowledge, or being from taking, or air from vegetation.

 

11.  The sensible ego is glorified through thought, but the sensible mind, the superconscious, is glorified through spirit, which derives as oxygen from and returns as breath to a universal source in the air that is all around one and yet nowhere visible.

 

12.  It is because of its essential and therefore mystical nature that air can be taken for granted, treated as if it didn't exist, polluted and desecrated by morally ignorant and irresponsible persons who, lacking idealism, have little or no inclination towards metaphysics.

 

13.  The extent to which the air and even the sky, that optical illusion created by sunlight, was polluted and desecrated by morally irresponsible persons in the twentieth century ... is all the proof one could need of how lacking in philosophy, and hence wisdom, modern society actually is, even to the extent of excluding or banishing the philosopher as, when genuine, an undesirable irrelevance and obstacle to the criminal pursuit of fame, the punishing pursuit of power, and the foolish pursuit of wealth in the interests, one can only suppose, of World-bolstering heathenism.

 

14.  Alas for the World! the philosophers do not entirely go away, nor can they be banished for ever; for a day is approaching when the work of this particular philosopher will be available for consideration, and then the World will be obliged to come to terms with it and, if it cannot disprove him, accept his wisdom as the only viable alternative to the criminal fame, punishing power, and foolish wealth to which it unwisely subscribes in the absence of graceful glory.

 

15.  Only then will there be anything like a Final Judgement, a Last Judgement, as the World comes to terms with the truth and elects, if sensible, to democratically do away with itself in the interests of 'Kingdom Come', and hence the promise of Eternity to which the triadic Beyond lays claim.

 

16.  Only when giving, taking, and even doing (acting) bow their heads to being ... will the philosopher be truly vindicated and a new age of wisdom be born, an age when not the Church but the Centre takes upon itself the spiritual guidance of mankind under the ideological auspices of Social Transcendentalism.

 

17.  This is the ideological philosophy of Social Transcendentalism, and the Social Transcendentalist is one who has taken knowledge to the brink of truth and shown how gnosticism can be transmuted into mysticism by those who are determined to experience the Life Eternal, the life of the Holy Spirit of Heaven, more completely, and hence beingfully, than the wisdom of philosophers has hitherto allowed.

                            

                             

LONDON 1997 (Revised 1998-2010)

 

 

REVELATIONS OF AN IDEOLOGICAL PHILOSOPHER 

 

 

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