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Synopses of Literary Works 1974-2014 by John O'Loughlin

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Opus 01

 

DOSSHOUSE BLUES: My first real collection of poems, written on and off during 1974-5, reflects the lyricism and formal simplicity of youth, showing the influence of poets like Rimbaud, Ezra Pound, Adrian Henri, and Doors lead singer Jim Morrison on my formative years as a writer. - A modest but by no means insignificant start to my literary career, which began, incidentally, with a few poems in Merstham, Surrey, before progressing, as here, first to Finsbury Park and then to Crouch End in north London (where I got the inspiration for the title poem), DOSSHOUSE BLUES will intrigue those who have personal experience of solitary life in cheap lodgings.

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Opus 02

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i>A MAGNANIMOUS OFFER: This little collection of prose pieces is composed of four one-act plays, or playlets, two of which are straight dialogues, together with a couple of short stories which I wrote at about the same time (1976), and which I believe to have a loosely poetic quality and deserve, for stylistic reasons, to be included with the playlets, the title piece of which is a shamelessly facetious spoof on Oscar Wilde.

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Opus 03

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i>CHANGING WORLDS: My first novel, written during the summer of 1976, is a largely autobiographical account of three days in the life of a clerk-turning-writer by name of Michael Savage, whose disillusionment with the drudgery of office work has led him to quit his job in London's West End in order to dedicate himself to a literary career ... come what may.  In this regard, Savage is a sort of Henry Miller, who doesn't believe in doing things by half-measures and, consequently, to him there is no sense in remaining a clerk when one has an imperative desire to become a writer and thus effectively 'change worlds'.  For him, it is a make-or-break situation, all the more poignant for its unfolding against a background of indifference or hostility from colleagues and relatives alike!  Of all my novels, CHANGING WORLDS is (together with FIXED LIMITS) by far the most subjective, with long passages of interior monologue which often overlap, to ironic effect, with conversational or observational settings, though I have taken extra care to differentiate reflection from conversation by utilizing single quotes in the one context and double quotes in the other - a stratagem which, though unorthodox, has probably done more than anything to condition my preference, contrary to literary norms, for double quotes in relation to conversational passages virtually right the way through my fictional oeuvre.  However that may be, it was probably the degree of this novel's subjectivity combined with its revolutionary technique which alienated most London publishers (apart from 'vanity press' ones) when first I attempted to have it published back in the late 1970s, and to this day I am proud of the fact that I was able to subvert literary objectivity to such a radical extent that ... the result is more philosophic than fictional, thus heralding my true destiny in the more unequivocally philosophical works to come!

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Opus 04

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i>FIXED LIMITS: If 'Changing Worlds' betrays the influence (through souped-up interior monologue) of James Joyce on my early fiction, then the chief inspiration behind this fictional journal was undoubtedly Jean-Paul Sartre or, rather, Sartre's first novel Nausea, which made such a profound impression on me ... that I simply felt I had to attempt something similar - albeit within a necessarily different milieu and social setting.  This was in the autumn of 1976, and the result was an account of some three weeks in the life of the very same character whom we first encounter as a disillusioned clerk in the earlier novel, but whose existence here, as a budding writer, is nothing short of a spiritual rebirth!  Now that Michael Savage has become or, at any rate, is in the process of becoming his intellectual self ... we are led into an even more subjective world than that of his previous incarnation, with further opportunities for both autobiographical and philosophical speculation on my part.  In fact, FIXED LIMITS should be regarded as the sequel to CHANGING WORLDS, without prior reference to which much of its subject-matter and settings would seem difficult if not impossible to understand.  For me, this was the literary Black Hole which led into a new universe of fictional writings thereafter, beyond the reach of my early mentors.

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Opus 05

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i>BETWEEN TRUTH AND ILLUSION: My first exercise in philosophy, originally penned in 1977, takes dualism as its starting-point and develops its commonsensical logic through three parts, the first of which is essayistic, the second of which is a series of aphoristic reflections on the philosophy outlined in Part One, and the third of which is a dialogue between me, the so-named 'philosopher', and an imaginary student ... that strives both to clarify and enlarge upon the main contentions of the work.

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Opus 06

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i>THE ILLUSORY TRUTH: Also divided into three parts, of which the first is by far the longest, this companion volume to the above expands on the dualistic theories outlined before, abandoning the more literary approach of BETWEEN TRUTH AND ILLUSION for an essayistic and aphoristic purism in which I began to develop an almost existentialist awareness of the extent to which many so-called truths are founded upon illusory concepts and, to that extent, are not really 'true' at all.

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Opus 07

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i>A QUESTION OF BELIEF: I first got the idea of writing a series of dialogues from reading the French philosopher Diderot, one of the great masters of the genre, and the result, several weeks later, was four fairly lengthy philosophical dialogues, which enabled me to continue developing the dualistic theories begun the previous year (1977).  Their subject-matter ranges from book collecting as an art and the morality of films to the influence of astrology on writers and historical perspectives, and although they tend to be a little one-sided, they are at least broad enough to be of some interest to the general reader.

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Opus 08

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i>THE FALL OF LOVE: The six essays included here, dating from 1979, signify a transitional stage away from the dualism of the above works towards the Spenglerian historicism that, with the influence of environment upon the rise and fall of civilizations, was to characterize my literary work at around this period.  Subjects discussed in such a light include literature, music, meditation, art, environment, and love.

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Opus 09

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i>CROSS-PURPOSES: This novel moves beyond the largely autobiographical concerns of my earlier experiments in the genre towards a more fictional integrity which led me by the nose, so to speak, into contexts and settings largely outside the domain of personal experience.  To be sure, the subjectivity of my first novel is in some degree still present (witness the opening chapter ... with its highly philosophical considerations), but it is now subordinate to the unfolding narrative ... as we follow the fortunes of James Kelly, a self-styled philosopher, through successive love-affairs which clash with his loyalties to friends and benefactors alike, culminating in deception and tragedy for all concerned.  One would think that CROSS-PURPOSES was a philosophical-novel-turned-romance, and so, up to a point, it is.  But it is also a tribute, in no small measure, to both Lawrence Durrell and Henry Miller; though one might be forgiven for detecting an implicit condemnation of the latter in the 'Paris chapter', as I like to think of Chapter 7, where Kelly's attitude to sexual promiscuity is concerned!  However, that is still my favourite chapter in what is probably my best novel.

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Opus 10

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i>AN INTERVIEW REVIEWED: This novel was written just after the above and is both more complex and subtler than its stylistic precursor.  Basically, the plot revolves around the efforts of Anthony Keating, a young correspondent for an arts periodical based in London's West End, to conduct a  prearranged interview with world-famous composer Howard Tonks when, to his dismay, the person who would normally have conducted the interview had gone down with influenza at the last moment.  Due to lack of experience in this field  Keating fails to complete his assignment on the specified day and is obliged to accept an alternative date for later that same week, when Tonks is due to return from a professional engagement in Birmingham.  However, the composer is detained there an extra day and, due to a combination of unforeseen factors, Keating ends-up seducing his daughter ... with disastrous consequences for both of them!  For they are discovered in flagrante delicto by Mr Tonks' elderly housekeeper, and word eventually gets back to the composer himself, causing serious allegations and misunderstandings which put not only the interview but Keating's very career as a correspondent for 'Arts Monthly' in jeopardy.  Ultimately only Howard Tonks' daughter, Rebecca, can save Keating from additional humiliation, but not before several turns in the plot have led him into deeper trouble with his boss and colleagues, and duly resulted in his dismissal.  However, thanks to Rebecca's influence with her father, the interview eventually goes ahead, and the resulting dilemma for 'Arts Monthly' is whether to publish or shelve it in view of the surrounding circumstances and the dismissal of its principal instigator from his post.  It is the composer himself, however, who has the final say, and it comes as both a shock and a delight to Anthony Keating. -  Those looking for philosophy in AN INTERVIEW REVIEWED will find much food for thought, as will those for whom humour is a sine qua non of literary entertainment.

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Opus 11

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i>A VISIT TO HELL: My first real collection of short prose, written during the autumn of 1979, combines literary and philosophical themes.  Surprisingly, the overall result is not displeasing and, although the subject-matter and settings of one or two of the contents are slightly dated, the best of them retain a freshness and relevance to the contemporary and, I hope, future world which should stand them in good stead for several years to-come.  Of the eight examples included, I especially recommend the title piece, 'A Visit to Hell', as a reflection, albeit slightly distorted by literary licence, of contemporary life in all its diabolical frenzy and hell-bent cacophony!

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Opus 12

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i>THE TRANSCENDENTAL FUTURE: This collection of philosophical writings, dating from 1980, begins with an introductory essay and progresses through some five lengthy dialogues.  Subjects tackled include spiritual truth, environmental transformations, the concept of a transcendent future, psychic evolution, and the rise of transcendentalism in art.  In sum, THE TRANSCENDENTAL FUTURE is a far from definitive but nonetheless highly engaging and sometimes mind-boggling debate on a variety of controversial issues.

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Opus 13

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i>THWARTED AMBITIONS: This, the first of three loosely-related novels written in 1980 and dealing with art and artists, is the tragic and, in some sense, pathetic account of a young artist by name of Robert Harding who is so obsessed with advancing his career ... that he becomes blind to the sexual machinations of Henry Grace, a wealthy and influential art critic, to seduce him whilst ostensibly posing as his admiring patron.  For Grace seems to be just the answer to Harding's professional ambitions, and the artist allows himself to be led from commission to commission by the older man without the slightest suspicion of what the latter is really all about.  But it is Carol, Harding's modelling girlfriend, whose suspicions are first aroused and, together with both the writer Andrew Doyle, who is Harding's next-door neighbour, and a professional acquaintance of hers, she plots to thwart Grace's sexual ambitions - with tragic consequences for the critic, as things turn out in this far from implausible narrative!

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Opus 14

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i>SECRET EXCHANGES: An artist is invited by his girlfriend to visit her parents in the provinces and, failing to get on with her father, duly finds himself inviting her mother to his London studio where, to his shame, he allows himself to be seduced by her whilst apparently teaching her to meditate.  Thereafter things go from bad to worse for Matthew Pearce, not to mention his girlfriend's mother, whose tetchy and ailing husband has discovered what he believes to be concrete evidence of her infidelity.  Yet Deirdre Evans is determined to capitalize on Matthew's previous hospitality, just as the latter is having serious doubts not only about her but, thanks in part to their affair, about his relationship with her daughter, Gwendolyn, as well!  Then, one evening, a friend of Gwen's turns up at his place and, before long, she precipitates him into a new and more passionate affair - in fact, the kind of affair for which he had been hoping all along!  So now it seems he can dispense with both Gwen and her mother and take up with Linda instead - provided, however, that she can secure a divorce from her husband on grounds of incompatibility.  For Linda Daniels is also a married woman, and, like Mrs Evans, the man to whom she is married proves himself to be no friend of Matthew Pearce!  Could that be the main motive for Pearce's willingness, bordering on recklessness, to enter into affairs with both women?  The reader is left to decide this and so much else for himself in what is, by any account, an ironic commentary on human relationships and their social and ideological interactions!

 

 

Opus 15

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i>LOGAN'S INFLUENCE: Invited to a party by his friend, Martin Thurber, the avant-garde writer Keith Logan quickly begins to turn their host against him by his radical views on God, evolution, religion, literature, etc., with a result that he quite spoils the party atmosphere for Edward Hurst, and unwittingly puts the future of Thurber's employment as an art critic for Hurst's magazine in jeopardy ... when, under duress of a hangover the following morning, the publisher decides to dispense with his art reviews partly in revenge for the intellectual humiliations inflicted upon him by Logan the previous night.  Yet Hurst has a crush on Thurber's girlfriend, who was also at the party, and, bumping into him in the street one afternoon, Greta Ryan elects to place her body at Hurst's disposal if only he will agree not to take any disciplinary action against Thurber.  Reluctantly, Hurst agrees to her proposal and it looks as though, thanks to her influence, Thurber's future as an art critic is assured.  In the meantime, however, the latter has invited Keith Logan to accompany him to a West End gallery in order to view an avant-garde artist whom he has been commissioned to review for Hurst, and before long he falls under the writer's radical influence and ends-up penning quite the most eulogistic review of such an artist ever!  Hurst, however, is less than impressed, and, under pressure from his sub-editor, he finds himself in the unenviable position of having to reject Thurber's review and effectively break his promise to Greta.  Naturally when the latter hears about this from her boyfriend, who now faces dismissal, she is incensed, and secretly vows to take her revenge on Hurst.  Unable to confide in Thurber, who knows nothing of her sexual accommodation with his boss, she visits Keith Logan and together they decide to contact Hurst's brother-in-law, to see if he can be persuaded to publish the review instead, since he also runs an arts magazine.  Happily for Thurber, Colin Patmore agrees to publish it, though only on condition that Greta befriends him on terms similar to those earlier secured by Hurst - or so one is led to infer from the dénouement, in which Logan witnesses Greta and Patmore getting into a taxi together and heading along the Charing Cross Road.  Echoes of AN INTERVIEW REVIEWED abound here, though LOGAN'S INFLUENCE is much deeper and more radical in its theorizing, as well as more cynical in its evaluation of human relationships.

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Opus 16

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i>FROM THE DEVIL TO GOD: Largely following-on from the above, this collection of short prose, written on and off during the winter of 1980-1, starts in a relatively literary fashion with the account of a clandestine visit of a masseuse to a priest who can no longer cope with his celibacy, and ends in a profoundly futuristic manner with an account of evolutionary progress towards a definitive Beyond, as envisaged by a radical philosopher.  In between there comes a fairly balanced alternation between literary and philosophical subjects ... as we follow the voyeuristic pleasures of a man covertly watching his wife getting dressed from the comfort of his early-morning bed; explore the evolutionary revelations of a de Chardinesque gnostic in the face of atheistic unbelief; witness the horror of a Mondrianesque ascetic, whose rural daytrip out of London with some friends proves to be more unsettling than he had bargained for; and go beyond conventional concepts of the Millennium, as of Millennialism, with a revolutionary thinker who believes that only when human brains are artificially supported and sustained will there be any prospect of heavenly salvation of a definitive order.

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Opus 17

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i>SUBLIMATED RELATIONS: A young religious writer named Timothy Byrne accepts an invitation from Lord Handon, an aristocratic admirer of his work, to spend New Year's Eve in the company of a select gathering at Rothermore House, Handon's country retreat, and winds up first dancing and then falling in love with one of his fellow guests, who happens to be an opera singer.  Much debate and festivity take place before Timothy discovers, in conjunction with the other guests, that the real motive for their presence there is to learn of and offer his services to the 'Voice Museum', an extraordinary project situated in London's Piccadilly which houses voice recordings of famous people in soundproofed booths where, for a small sum, the public can sample words of wisdom and/or folly at the touch of a button.  Thus it is that Timothy Byrne agrees to allow his voice to be recorded for future use by the museum's principal director, Girish O'Donnell - as, of course, do each of the other guests, all of whom are either established or budding talents in the arts.  Meanwhile Lord Handon has been attempting to conduct a low-key relationship with Sarah Field, the opera singer, though with little success, in view of her preference for Timothy and knowledge of the viscount's secret - a secret which has more than a little to do with the strange nature of his relations, necessarily sublimated, with women.  Equally unsuccessful are Handon's attempts to subvert Byrne's spiritual standing as a self-styled guru through his daughter, Geraldine, though, unbeknown to anyone else, the writer has already undermined it through Sarah and has no need of further seductions!  Another of my philosophic-turned-romantic novels, SUBLIMATED RELATIONS is nevertheless much bolder and freer than the others.

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Opus 18

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i>THE WAY OF EVOLUTION: Dating from 1981, this collection of nine essays is thematically more homogeneous than those included in THE FALL OF LOVE, and reflects a more optimistic outlook on evolutionary progress, as something which should culminate in a future paradise having nothing whatsoever to do with the cosmic inception of life.  Art, literature, music, sex, gender, history, technology, and religion are the principal themes under consideration here, and they are generally treated in relation to my philosophy of evolution, which owes not a little, in its origins, to the estimable likes of Nietzsche, Spengler, and Theilhard de Chardin.  As usual for my work of this period, THE WAY OF EVOLUTION ends with a series of maxims, which both summarize and encapsulate its overall philosophy.

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Opus 19

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i>DREAM COMPROMISE: This collection of short prose, dating from the autumn of 1981, includes what is arguably the most literary piece I have ever written - namely 'A Canine Crime', which deals with the problems of dog ownership in an age and society which has turned against such a thing, making it illegal.  Also of special note here is the fetishistically erotic 'Nolan's Investigations', which opens the collection, and the partly autobiographical title piece 'Dream Compromise', which has a trick in its tail, so to speak.... As, incidentally, does the volume as a whole, in that it ends with a series of aphorisms, in keeping with the broadly philosophical bias of my maturer literary works.

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Opus 20

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i>DECEPTIVE MOTIVES: With an opening chapter that highlights the duplicity of a husband towards his wife, this novel builds on the marital dissatisfactions and grudges of its principal heroine, Julie Foster, and couples them to the literary and social dissatisfactions, grudges, etc., of one Peter Morrison, an unpublished and seemingly unpublishable writer, as the two characters bump into each other in a restaurant, after many years, and Julie agrees to accompany Morrison back to his squalid flat where, contrary to her expectations, he simply proceeds to expatiate on his political and philosophical views, and to disburden himself of a number of anti-social grudges.  He does, however, invite her to visit him again and, to his surprise, she accepts the invitation and turns up a couple of days later.  This time they get down to some serious sexual congress but, in the process, Julie impulsively reveals that she is married and Morrison, aghast at her deception, loses his temper and proceeds to strangle her.  Overcome with remorse, he attempts to mollify Julie, now a corpse, by taking photographs of her in a variety of erotic poses, and is then faced with the unsavoury task of disposing of her body.  However, an old friend of Julie's becomes suspicious by her failure to turn up at a pre-arranged rendezvous and, aware from a prior phone conversation that Julie was intending to visit Morrison, begins to make inquiries about him from what little information she has.  Eventually, she tracks him down to his latest address and, mindful of the fact that he once had amorous leanings towards her, falls into a frantic sexual coupling with him.  Things are looking good for Peter at this point but, whilst he is out of the room, Deirdre discovers photographic evidence of Julie's murder and proceeds to accost him with it on his return.  Unable to calm her down or explain away the evidence, he is obliged to kill her too, thus saddling himself with the problem of disposing of yet another corpse!  Subsequently he moves to Ireland and, under the alias of James Coughlin, becomes something of an intellectual and ideological hero, the 'coming man' and potential saviour of his country.  However, there is someone in the audience at one of his lectures who was with Julie in the restaurant on the day she was approached by Morrison, and this woman now begins to recognize who Coughlin really is.  Horrified, she rushes out of the hall and heads for home, leaving a bemused husband struggling in her frantic wake.  What happens next is indeed an ironic commentary on loyalties; for caught between her recognition of Coughlin and a  realization of his political importance to the country, she in unable to reveal his true identity and winds-up committing suicide to save his reputation.  Before she dies, however, she has second thoughts about her terrible secret.  But her expiring mumblings of the truth to her husband are misinterpreted, in what is the final and most ironic 'deceptive motive' of them all!

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Opus 21

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i>THE IMPORTANCE OF TECHNOLOGY: Written in the winter of 1981-2, this collection of dialogues is more stylistically and thematically evolved than those included in THE TRANSCENDENTAL FUTURE, with subjects ranging from the significance of spiritual development to the nature of philosophical truth, the unitary goal of evolution, different types of decadence, and the parallels between literary figures such as Henry Miller and Malcolm Muggeridge.  Also featured, as per custom, is an aphoristic appendix, which both subsumes and expands on a variety of the subjects under discussion.

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Opus 22

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i>STRESSING THE ESSENTIAL: This little collection of twenty-five mainly philosophical poems, written during 1982, should confirm, more than anything, that I had considerably deepened my approach to and concept of poetry since DOSSHOUSE BLUES, and the result should not prove displeasing to anyone who would prefer to see me, as I myself do, primarily as a philosopher (albeit a self-taught one) who occasionally dabbles in other things, poetry not excepted.  Doubtless the fact that I am an Irish citizen who, brought to England as a young child, has spent the greater part of his life in exile from his native country ... has something to do with this paradoxical state-of-affairs, since one is often exposed to contrary influences and predilections, both natural and artificial, neither of which greatly ingratiates one to less complex or, perhaps I should say, paradoxically confused people?  Be that as it may, I accept that I have, at various times in my life, been prepared to dabble in poetry, even if from a philosophic rather than a strictly poetic standpoint, since the adoption of alternative genres makes for variety both in the presentation and conception of one's thought, and that can be most beneficial to the writer himself, who could otherwise bog down in one mould and grow stale or bored, as the case might be.  STRESSING THE ESSENTIAL, the first of four collections of philosophical poems written in successive years, precluded me from experiencing such a stultifying fate, and was thus of indirect benefit to my philosophical will.  It was not, however, any the less easy to write!

 

 

Opus 23

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i>FUTURE TRANSFORMATIONS: This volume of philosophy, combining essays, dialogues, and maxims, goes way beyond the scope of my earlier philosophical works in outlining what I consider to be the logical stages of evolution beyond man which will have to be passed through before definitive salvation can be achieved in a transcendent goal of evolution ... analogous to Teilhard de Chardin's Omega Point.  One could say that I have attempted to concretize Nietzschean notions concerning man's overcoming ... in respect of specific post-human stages.  Hitherto, when I wrote about more advanced stages of life, it was generally within the scope and definition of man.  Here, by contrast, the attainment to a more artificial stage of evolution is, ipso facto, chronologically beyond man and thus implicitly post-human.  Such was the revolutionary break with my earlier thinking which occurred early in 1982, and it is, I believe, of momentous significance!  Henceforth my philosophical task was largely to be a refinement upon and modification of contentions outlined here.  Obviously, in the many years that have passed since then, several changes, some of them quite drastic, have occurred in my perspective.  But the beginnings of my mature philosophical oeuvre are here, in FUTURE TRANSFORMATIONS, and it was from this time onwards that I began to grow into what I like to think of as a sort of messianic self-awareness.

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Opus 24

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i>FALSE PRETENCES: Written in the late-Spring of 1982, this novel has something of a Spring-like ebullience about it which takes us to the Norfolk countryside and to the stratagems of a radical writer-turned-artist by name of Jason Crilly (who for the most part remains veiled behind first-person narrations) to shake off a depression he contracted while living alone in an insalubrious part of North London.  His wife Susan, whom he married shortly after moving to Norfolk, is one of the stratagems in his arsenal in this respect.  Also living in Norfolk are a number of eccentric or ironic personages who make a variety of claims on our protagonist's time, the most conspicuous of whom is Edmond Shead, the inventor of an artificial copulator, who requires of him that he uses his not inconsiderable artistic talents to depict this machine to graphic effect, thereby assisting Lyttleton, a businessman with designs on its production, to make a commercial success of it.  Shortly afterwards Jason Crilly renews connections with an old flame of his and this takes him temporarily back to London where, in view of her good looks and the sexual dissatisfactions he has recently been feeling towards his wife, he allows himself to be seduced by her.  Of even greater significance, however, is the fact that Philomena has just inherited a substantial property in the country and is anxious to move into it as soon as possible.  But her husband, who works in London, has no desire to give up his job in order to move there with her, since he has good prospects of promotion and is temperamentally averse to the idea of living in the country.  That leaves Philomena with the dilemma of whether to sell Blandon, her country house, or secure a divorce from her husband in order to move there with someone else.  And that puts the pressure on our protagonist to decide whether he should leave Susan for Philomena, and hence an even bigger and more peacefully secluded house in which to conduct his campaign against depression.  Fortunately for him this decision is made easier by his secret discovery of Susan's infidelity when he returns to Norfolk, since she is having an affair with their local doctor, and that puts him in an easier frame-of-mind with which to return, subsequently, to Philomena and move with her to Blandon.  However, before their separation, his wife induces him to provide her with a child, but not exactly in the conventional manner!  The good doctor suspects nothing of the deception, however, and proceeds to marry Susan as a matter of course.  Those who esteem writers like the aforementioned Henry Miller and Lawrence Durrell will probably find FALSE PRETENCES to their taste.

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Opus 25

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i>BECOMING AND BEING: Divided into two parts, the first of which is autobiographical and the second biographical, this project strives to outline my development as a writer and the influences, both literary and philosophical, which shaped me over the years leading up to 1982.  The first part, containing subjects ranging from sex and politics to health and writers, is slightly Nietzschean in its speculative approach to autobiography, while the second and more voluminous part, which deals with the estimable likes of John Cowper Powys, D.H. Lawrence, Aldous Huxley, Hermann Hesse, Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, Arthur Koestler, Lawrence Durrell, Henry Miller, and George Orwell, is intended to provide a biographical summary and fairly blunt appraisal of authors whose works were to inspire me during my formative years as a writer.  It is as though they were the beings whom I was eventually destined to become or, rather, that I became being - and hence a writer - through them.  Finally, there is an appendix comprised of a list of reading material borrowed from Hornsey Library over a twelve-year period from 1977-89, which should intrigue those interested to discover how a self-taught, and even self-made, person can fare with regard to the acquirement of a literary culture that owes little or nothing to school or college.

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Opus 26

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i>POST-ATOMIC PERSPECTIVES: Combining maxims with aphorisms, essays, and dialogues, this work goes beyond the scope of my previous philosophical projects in both its form and content, opening out towards a post-atomic future in what amounts to an entirely new civilization.  As conceived of here, the aphorisms are slightly longer and freer than the maxims and thus lead, logically enough, to the essays, which constitute Part Three of the book.  Subjects include the direction of literature in the civilization to come; the transitional nature of contemporary literature; revelations concerning future life forms and their relationship to what is called the Ultimate Creation; the nature of divine love in relation to other types of love and its bearing on messianic credibility; antithetical equivalents - such as birds and planes or horses and motorbikes - in the evolution of human and other life; how the State 'withers' and why; the paradoxical allegiance of Christian pagans, or so-called Christians whose loyalty is rather more to the Creator than to Christ; and transcendental transvaluations in a world that has largely turned its back on nature.  Part Four is comprised of four dialogues, which continue the philosophical debate in a slightly more dramatic vein.

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Opus 27

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i>POST-ATOMIC INTEGRITIES: This little novella, based around an autobiographical fantasy, shares with FALSE PRETENCES the stylistic device of first-person narrative, and relates the nocturnal visit of an old acquaintance to the flat of an admirer who had optimistically written to her in the hope of receiving a positive response.  What follows is a romantic pact in which Carmel agrees to live with Joe, provided he accepts responsibility for her daughter, Julia.  He does, and the trio live happily ever after, or so it seems.  For when Julia comes of age there is a sexual treat in store for her which conforms to the post-atomic integrity of our narrative, and such an integrity owes nothing to conventional or traditional marital customs!  In fact, marriage is completely out-of-the-question for these three people, whose raison d'être is to remain free and liberated, come what may!  Clashes of interest inevitably occur, but it seems that the women are prepared to accommodate this radical philosopher and live on a sexually equal basis with their man, or so one is led to suppose.

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Opus 28

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i>MILLENNIAL PROJECTIONS: This fictional compilation, dating from 1982, combines some sixteen short-prose pieces with subjects ranging from musical evolution to Christmas trees, Black Holes to Esperanto, and space travel to modern art.  Of this number, my favourite is the title piece, a fantasy projection into a millennial future in which we enter the mind of a superman who is preparing to undergo an 'acid trip', view life in what is called the 'post-human millennium' from a spiritual leader's standpoint as he grapples with his counselling responsibilities vis-à-vis the superhuman flock, and sample a controller's perspective on post-human life from the administrative sidelines.  One could argue that this is my 'Brave New World', but it was with a view to refuting Huxleyite cynicism that I set out to fashion so positive a futuristic projection.

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Opus 29

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i>SPIRITUAL INTIMATIONS: Comprised of thirty-four poems, this collection of verse is slightly freer, overall, than the previous one, and ranges across a wide variety of topics ... from politics and sex to literature and money ... in what I prefer to regard as a loosely poetic way, though not one devoid of stylistic methodology or thematic consistency!

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Opus 30

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i>THE WILL TO TRUTH: My main philosophical project of 1983 combines dialogues and essays with aphorisms and maxims in a four-part volume of which essays form the greater proportion.  However, nine dialogues is no mean undertaking, and they range from subjects as diverse, albeit interrelated, as the freeing of art from mundane attachments as it evolves from pagan to transcendental times; the distinction between Jews and Israelis; the development of awareness at the expense of feeling in art; the moral implications of sexual sublimation; the evolutionary struggle from gravity to curved space; the development of religion from the personal to the universal; the nature of petty-bourgeois art; the possibility of denominational progress in Western religion; and the apotheosis of the 'universal man'.  Such, then, is the scope of Part One, while Part Two enlarges on many of the subjects touched upon in the dialogues, as well as introduces a number of new ones, including the main distinction between Christianity and Transcendentalism; the psychology of swearers; the irrelevance of punishment to a transcendental society; architectural and sartorial relationships to gravity both upwards and downwards; understanding Jazz in relation to other types of modern music; the distinction between philosophy and pseudo-philosophy; and the nature of ultimate music.  Originally intended as a sort of sequel to the above, Parts Three and Four move us from the phenomenal realm of dialogues and essays to what I like to think of as the noumenal realm of aphorisms and maxims, in which the will is One with the truth it strives to convey through the most concise means and is, if not Truth itself, then at any rate certainly truthful!  Subjects treated here include the relation between sexuality and dress; the nature of the self; the significance of Israel; the role and nature of worship in popular religion; poetry verses philosophy; the evolution of the arts; the metaphysics of modern music; the psyche; God; ideology; and gender.  Although THE WILL TO TRUTH should not be taken for the Truth, it signifies a significant stage on the road to my achievement of greater degrees of philosophical truth in due course, and is certainly more radical than anything preceding it in this field.

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Opus 31

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i>A SELFISH MAN: Another volume of short prose, in which a number of my principal philosophical themes are recycled in literary guise for the benefit of a wider understanding, this collection begins with the title piece, a first-person narrative by an advocate of spiritual selfishness, and winds its way through fifteen other examples of my art in this field, culminating in a section of interior monologues which features twelve different thinkers who successively elaborate on their likes and dislikes from a similar ideological standpoint, thereby establishing a unity of mind which transcends their phenomenal separatenesses.  In between these two extremes there are varying amounts of unity and disunity between the characters, but all are caught in the throes of a vigorous philosophical debate.  For here, as in other kindred works, action is subordinate to thought, whether we are dealing with a drive to the cinema, a couple watching television, reflections on a soapbox orator, a clandestine affair, or the vicissitudes of a revolutionary politician.  Sometimes the characters have names, sometimes not.  Sometimes they are a fairly transparent projection of me, at other times a degree of fictional objectivity has gone into their fashioning.  Whatever the case, A SELFISH MAN, dating from 1983, bears ample witness to this philosopher-artist's search for literary perfection through thought.

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Opus 32

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i>ABSTRACTS: The essayistic introduction to this little collection of abstract poems attempts to clarify a distinction between poetry and antipoetry, and then to contrast both of these with what I have termed superpoems - the abstract poetry of a transcendental age or civilization which strives to dissolve grammatical appearances into a non-descriptive essence.  Whether or not I was successful in my clarifying endeavour, or even correct in my theorizing at this time (1983), ABSTRACTS is a collection of poems which, whilst mostly readerly, is devoid of conventional significance, and therefore has to be read or, rather, understood in relation to the underlying significance, where apparent, of the form, which lifts each poem above the usual phenomenal realm of descriptive poetry towards a transcendent realm of pure abstraction.

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Opus 33

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i>SOCIAL TRANSCENDENTALISM - 'Means to an End': This collection of essays, dialogues, aphorisms, and maxims, dating from 1983-4, is largely the reverse, in formal terms, of THE WILL TO TRUTH, inasmuch as its first part is essayistic and its second part entirely composed of dialogues, thereby again bringing these two modes of philosophical phenomenality into harmony or, at any rate, close juxtaposition.  Here, as before, the essays constitute the main part, and they are once more conceived within the protective umbrella of a uniform ideology - namely the Social Transcendentalism which I had been building towards in earlier works but which here comes to ideological fruition.  Thus, whatever the subject, it is treated from a uniform standpoint, the standpoint of a socially transcendent outlook upon life, and this even when I am not consciously aware of the fact.  Such an outlook is beyond humanism and all other worldly ideologies, having to do with evolutionary striving towards a 'divine kingdom'.  Yet this 'divine kingdom' does not follow death, as we customarily understand it, but presupposes the ordering of society according to certain idealistic principles designed to free mankind from its atomic past.  Hence in each of these essays and dialogues, not to mention the ensuing aphorisms and maxims, a Social Transcendentalist concern with Truth is what really matters, and it is this which leads us towards the heavenly millennium to-come.  Whether the subject is art, literature, sex, politics, psychology, drugs, or whatever, the emphasis on Truth from a specific ideological perspective is what lifts SOCIAL TRANSCENDENTALISM beyond the sterile realm of intellectual speculation to the potent challenge of universal freedom.

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Opus 34

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i>BEYOND THE PALE - 'Growth of a Messiah': Comprised of various autobiographical sketches, this literary work is divided into four sections, the first dating from 1983, the second from 1985, the third from 1993, and the fourth from 1996.  These sketches are written in the notational vein of my mature philosophy (especially from 1985 onwards) and often overlap with general speculations on a variety of subjects which have played a significant role in my personal life.  Thus they are anything but purely autobiographical, although autobiography forms the basis of this project, which is certainly beyond the pale of 1983 so far as three of the four sections are concerned.

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Opus 35

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i>THE MODERN DEATH: Dating from 1984, this collection of forty-four poems continues in the free-verse style of SPIRITUAL INTIMATIONS, albeit the verse is at all times prevented from degenerating into prose through the application of a methodological consistency which continues to favour the definite/indefinite article at the expense of lesser words.  More significant of this collection is its greater concern with metaphysics, or subatomic theories, which, though far from definitive, enabled me to dig beneath the surface of my themes to what I hoped would be their spiritual depths.  In retrospect, I can see how much ground I still had to cover, or perhaps I should say unearth? in order to arrive at the Truth.  But this was still a significant stage in my progress as a metaphysician, even if it took a poetic turn.

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Opus 36

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i>THE POLITICS OF SEXUALITY: A six-chapter novella of first-person and loosely autobiographical tendency, this title explores the concept of sexual politics, or the notion that every mode of politics has a sexual corollary.  Although such an idea was by no means new to my work at this time (1984), it hadn't been explored to anything like the same extent before, and it is a theme to which I have since returned quite frequently, always seeking to improve upon my initial theories, which, through bitter experience over the years, I've learnt to regard as more of a springboard to better things than as a definitive statement.

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Opus 37

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i>A TRUE EXTREMISM: This collection of fifteen short-prose pieces puts my ideological philosophy through a literary prism, as we explore a variety of interrelated themes from a loosely fictional standpoint.  In fact politics, whether associated with a correlative mode of sexuality or not, also figures quite prominently here, though usually in connection with Social Transcendentalism, which is both political and more than political.  Those especially interested in philosophy will find the last three titles in this collection particularly intriguing, since they were conceived in a loosely aphoristic vein, the final one being a kind of oblique tribute to Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra.

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Opus 38

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i>EVOLUTION: The sixteen prose poems here should be ideally suited to those who prefer their poetry prosy and mainly concerned with philosophical issues or, at any rate, with a philosophical treatment of issues and subjects that could be treated more frivolously, if one lacked the intellectual machinery and moral insight with which to tackle them in this way.  I suspect that my first attempt at prose poems, back in DOSSHOUSE BLUES (1973-5), was more poetically frivolous than is to be found here, though that would be in keeping with my work of the period.  Ten years later and the results are far more interesting, with perhaps a little hint of Baudelairian influence here and there, albeit without conscious intention on my part.  However that may be, these prose poems are not essays, whatever appearances might suggest to the contrary, but painfully contrived pieces which never part company with the context in which they were conceived.

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Opus 39

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i>TREES: It seems that I add ten poems to each new volume of poetry, for this collection has some fifty four, dating from 1985, which carry on, both stylistically and thematically, from approximately where those in THE MODERN DEATH leave off, with, if anything, a slightly deeper metaphysical and ideological bias.  The title derives, as usual, from one of the poems, and has to be read to be believed!

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Opus 40

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i>CONTEMPLATIONS1: Unlike my previous collection of abstract poems, simply called ABSTRACTS, this project is non-readerly and hence abstract in a patterned and completely formal way such that requires nothing more than contemplation, as suggested by the title, of its monosyllabic structures.  Thus all 395 (divided into 3 volumes) of these lower-case poems are intended to assist one in developing a contemplative frame-of-mind at the expense of readerly norms, thereby transcending the intellect in what could be regarded as a mode of literary salvation.

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Opus 40

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i>CONTEMPLATIONS2: See Contemplations 1 above.

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Opus 40

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i>CONTEMPLATIONS3: See Contemplations 1 above.

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Opus 41

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i>PORTRAITS: Comprising thirty-three biographical sketches of some of the twentieth-century's most influential and powerful people in both politics and the arts, including Hitler, Stalin, de Valera, Mussolini, de Gaulle, André Malraux, Bertrand Russell, Dali, Lenin, Simone de Beauvoir, and David Ben-Gurian, PORTRAITS (1985) seeks to provoke as well as to praise, and should prove of interest to those who are curious to learn how various exceptional men - and one exceptional woman - measure up to a Social Transcendentalist analysis or, more correctly, to the scrutiny of someone who approaches life from a specific ideological standpoint with a view to measuring the achievements of others in relation to it.  Although I had dealt with some of the subjects, including Sartre, Huxley, and Durrell before (see BECOMING AND BEING), my treatment of them here is much more subjectively critical and thus a reflection, in large measure, of the way my thinking had progressed in the intervening three years since my earlier excursion into biography which, characteristic of a more relativistic approach to literature colouring my work at that time, also embraced a series of autobiographical sketches.  No such relativity applies here, however, although the choice of both politicians and artists is anything but absolutist.

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Opus 42

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i>EVALUATIONS ANF REVALUATIONS: Although a relatively minor work in itself, this volume of essayistic aphorisms and aphoristic notes is significant inasmuch as it signifies another of my attempts to approach and develop Truth from a consistently aphoristic not to say ideological angle, and may be regarded as a harbinger of the types of projects that were to preoccupy me during the years 1985-93.  Divided into two parts, both of which are largely concerned with evaluating and revaluating various philosophical positions either already taken or common to my work in general, it paved the way for the systematic evaluating and revaluating which was to become so characteristic of my work from now on, and to prove of such significance in my ability to develop and summarize Truth thereafter.  The principal theme and concern of EVALUATIONS AND REVALUATIONS is Social Transcendentalism and its relation to what I term 'the Centre' - a politico-religious concept which the ideology in question wishes to democratically advance at the expense of traditional state/church relativity.

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Opus 43

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i>DEVIL AND GOD - 'The Omega Book': Originally intended to be my last and ultimate book, this project, dealing with distinctions between the Devil and God, embraces over 250 supernotes, my definition of which is something that falls between an essay and an aphorism, not generally as long as the former nor as short as the latter.  In fact, it is the indeterminacy of this genre which most characterizes DEVIL AND GOD, since one can proceed straight from a few-line entry to one which is several pages in length.  Also significant of my definition of supernotes is the fact that they are anything but scrappy or off-the-cuff, like notes often tend to be, but have been carefully fashioned with the attention one would give to an essay or an aphorism.  They also follow a strictly determined philosophical path, not veering wildly between disparate subjects the way notebooks often do, and are subject to the sort of evaluating and revaluating I outlined above, so that no theme is ever wholly laid to rest until it has been explored from a variety of angles and reconsidered in the light of greater insight.  In such fashion, any project based on these supernotes will have a curvilinear inner structure which is the product of spiralling ideas, and which contrasts with the outer, book-based structures more typical of academic or conventional philosophy.  In that respect it is effectively theosophical.

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Opus 44

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i>FROM MATERIALISM TO IDEALISM: Akin to the above in structure, this 1986-7 project combines nearly 250 supernotes (or essayistic aphorisms and aphoristic notes) in its investigation of a wide variety of subjects, with particular reference to the relationships between materialism, naturalism, realism, and idealism in what is conceived to be an evolutionary framework.  Hence the title 'From Materialism to Idealism', in which a fourfold view of history and of the world is systematically developed.

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Opus 45

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i>TOWARDS THE SUPERNOUMENON: Carrying on from where the above leaves off, this volume of supernotes is more intensely philosophical, as it introduces to the aforementioned fourfold structures the concept of devolutionary/evolutionary antitheses in historical evolution, coupling this to an investigation of certain key philosophers, including Schopenhauer, and contrasting his noumenal-phenomenal approach to philosophy with what I have called a superphenomenal-supernoumenal one intended to illustrate the distinction between 'artificial' modernity and 'naturalistic' antiquity.  In this respect it could be said to reflect a contrast between philosophy, as traditionally practised by alpha-stemming thinkers like Schopenhauer, and theosophy, in which an evolutionary drive towards the omega of things is discernible.

 

 

Opus 46

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i>ELEMENTAL SPECTRA: Dating from 1988-9, this more philosophically advanced work investigates the significance of the basic elements, viz. air, fire, water, and earth, with regard to a variety of different contexts, including science, politics, economics, and religion, and seeks to draw ideological and moral lessons from the apperceived correlations.  Of additional significance in relation to the elements are the relationships between being and doing, awareness and emotion, mind and brain, nature and artifice, and individualism and collectivism.  There is also, within ELEMENTAL SPECTRA, a critique of Arthur Koestler's tripartite theories, as developed in books like The Act of Creation and Janus - A Summing Up, as well as a refutation of his psychological pessimism concerning the dichotomous relationship between what he calls the 'old brain' and the 'new brain'.  In fact, Koestler is no less the principal philosophical target of this work than Schopenhauer was of the previous one, and although I acknowledge my debt to him as an influence on my thought, I was able to move beyond him at this point and accordingly dispense with a number of his theories.

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Opus 47

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i>CRITIQUE OF POST-DIALECTICAL IDEALISM: Although not a critique in the strictly analytical sense, this work is nonetheless sufficiently methodical and wide-ranging in its comprehensive treatment of a variety of interrelated subjects to warrant serious consideration as a vehicle for the advancement, on a Social Transcendentalist basis, of post-dialectical idealism (truth) in a world too long torn between the conflicting claims of realism and materialism.  Of especial significance here are the T-like diagrammatic structures which enabled me to flesh-out, in fairly comprehensive vein, the various components of any given subject and to analyse it in relation to my overriding idealistic bias.  Subjects tackled include a theory of the connections between a given mode of attire and the most appropriate approach to sexual intercourse in relation to it, as well as an investigation of the relationships between 'naturalistic' and artificial products or technologies at both 'head' and 'bodily' levels.

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Opus 48

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i>PHILOSOPHICAL TRUTH: Akin to the above, this work builds from its initial dualistic introduction to a fully-fledged Social Transcendentalist critique, in which the by-now familiar quadruple structures of the earlier work are examined in regard to a number of new contexts, with particular emphasis on music and its relationship to ideological parallels.

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Opus 49

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i>VERITAS PHILOSOPHICUS: This book derives its Latin-sounding title from the use of 'V' structures in a majority of the diagrams which characterize it and which enabled me to approach Truth from a more systematic and comprehensive standpoint, building on the 'T' structures common to both the CRITIQUE OF POST-DIALECTICAL IDEALISM and PHILOSOPHICAL TRUTH (see above), until I had amassed a considerable number of diagrammatic quadruplicities of the sort deriving from their 'elemental' theories.  Of real significance here is the modification of perspective which develops from the use of two different types of diagrammatic structure, and it is characteristic of my methodology that the earlier perspective is either corrected or refuted, as we move into a more logically advanced structural mode.

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Opus 50

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i>LAST JUDGEMENTS: This is the final (and shortest) volume of what I now like to loosely think of as 'The Omega Octet', i.e. all the volumes of supernotes stemming from DEVIL AND GOD - 'The Omega Book', and, not surprisingly, it tends to sum up or refine upon a number of the principal theories already discussed, as well as lay the foundation for the next stage of my philosophical advance.

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Opus 51

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i>MAXIMUM TRUTH: If the essayistic aphorisms and aphoristic notes of 'The Omega Octet' are of indeterminate length, then what follows here, dating from 1993, is of an aphoristic purism which allows for little or no deviation from the basic form.  One could say that I had passed through the darkness into the full light(ness) of Truth at this point, and the result is a vindication not only of the aforementioned octet, but of my entire philosophical quest to-date.  Comprised of 707 maxims which have been given 'a/b' subdivisions, MAXIMUM TRUTH succeeds in achieving the sort of metaphysical comprehensiveness which I had been struggling towards all along.  One could say that it signifies a refinement upon the essayistic aphorisms and aphoristic notes of 'The Omega Octet', though the tendency to recycle ideas, by now a veritable principle of my work, persists here to even greater effect, insofar as it was this technique that made the attainment of what is in some respects a maximum degree of truth possible.

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Opus 52

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i>TRUTHFUL MAXIMS: Following on from the above, this text is written on a slightly more straightforward, though no less truth-intensive basis, and extends beyond most of the material contained in MAXIMUM TRUTH; It is also comprised of 707 numbered maxims.

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Opus 53

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i>INFORMAL MAXIMS: This collection of maxims, also dating from 1993, continues from where the above left off, and does so in a similar, albeit less stylistically intensive vein, achieving what I hold to be the elaboration and exploration of a conceptual comprehensiveness quite unique to philosophy.  Comprised of nearly 600 maxims, some of which are slightly longer than in the earlier compilations, INFORMAL MAXIMS duly paved the way for MAXIMUM INFORMALITY (see below).

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Opus 54

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i>MAXIMUM INFORMALITY: The text of this work is not only stylistically less formal but thematically more complex, as we proceed through over 1000 maxims of disparate length in what is, by any standards, a demandingly mind-expanding philosophical adventure!

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Opus 55

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i>SUPERCONTEMPLATIONS: This little collection of non-readerly abstract poems, also dating from 1993, is comprised of sixty poems utilizing a combination of lower and upper case monosyllabic words, thereby extending beyond the lower-case scope of the three volumes of 'Contemplations' (1985) into more complex and aesthetically-gratifying examples of the genre.

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Opus 56

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i>FROM SATAN TO SATURN: Conceived in a loosely cyclical form, this 1994 project harks back to the works comprising essayistic aphorisms and aphoristic notes in respect of the greater variety of length and treatment between the contents, some of which are arguably aphoristic, others essayistic, but all of which thematically carry-on from my previous philosophical work in a no-less comprehensively methodical vein.

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Opus 57

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i>FROM PUNISHMENT TO GRACE: Akin to the above in structure, this title develops its curvilinear style through some seventy-two cycles each comprised of a number of aphorisms, which continue my quest for philosophical perfection along both old and new channels of speculative investigation.

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Opus 58

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i>ULTRACONTEMPLATIONS: Another and more structurally advanced example of my non-readerly style of abstract poetry, 'Ultracontemplations' (1994) is comprised of some sixty-four poems which have been entirely constructed, along monosyllabic lines, with the use of upper-case characters, thereby passing beyond the mixed-case style of SUPERCONTEMPLATIONS to what I regard as a conceptual plateau of poetic abstraction.

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Opus 59

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i>OCCASIONAL MAXIMS: This 1994 project is composed of some 323 notational maxims of variable length and quality, most of which are nevertheless significantly more complex than anything previously attempted in the genre, with subjects, as usual, ranging right across my philosophical spectrum, from science and politics to economics and religion. 

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Opus 60

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i>MAXIMUM OCCASIONS: This text, comprised of over 170 maxims of which not a few are virtually essayistic, is in effect largely a refutation of OCCASIONAL MAXIMS ... as we move from a philosophical bias to one that is effectively theosophical, and develop, in the process, an enhanced sense of logic which both contrasts with and complements a number of the earlier contentions.

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Opus 61

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i>LAST (W)RITES: Continuing the revolutionary transvaluations characteristic of the above, this title returns us, in due cumulative fashion, to the cyclical style adopted in FROM PUNISHMENT OT GRACE, albeit with the use of side titles rather than numerals, and with a view to bringing to completion a task which really began several years ago ... when I boldly set out on the long and difficult path that leads to Truth.  Little did I realize, at the time, that not only would I eventually get to the Truth (which, in any case, I maintain no-one had previously done to anything like the same extent) but ... actually overhaul it, in what is effectively a literary parallel to Heaven.

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Opus 62

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i>ETERNAL LIFE - 'Supernotes From Beyond': Progressing through 125 cycles of essayistic aphorisms/aphoristic notes, this title brings my philosophy to a theosophical head in what is arguably one of the most thematically perfect of all my works and one which, so I believe, should stand near the conceptual apex of my oeuvre, as I both sum up and elaborate on and/or revaluate previous truths with a view to advancing the cause of eternal life in a world which is still, alas, all too temporal!

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Opus 63

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i>BOOK OF BELIEFS - 'The Omegala': More informally cyclic than the above, this 1996 project combines aphorisms with notes in what is one of the most comprehensively exacting and demanding of all my works, but also, in the long run, one of the most thematically rewarding.

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Opus 64

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i>OMEGA MAXIMS: Dating from 1996, this title is a further instalment of the aphoristic purism to which I had last committed my pen with MAXIMUM OCCASIONS, and constitutes what I regard as the best work of its kind prior to its companion text MAXIMUM OMEGA (see below).  In all, there are over 1000 maxims in this project.

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Opus 65

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i>MAXIMUM OMEGA: Also dating from 1996, this work constitutes possibly my finest collection of maxims, doing more justice to Truth, and thus philosophy, than any of the previous works, including the cyclical ones mentioned above.  In fact, here at last, in this collection of 575 maxims, is my magnum omega, bringing to completion, in this particular genre, my quest for philosophical perfection through what is arguably the most advanced philosophy ever elaborated.

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Opus 66

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i>OMEGANOTES OF AN IDEOLOGICAL PHILOSOPHER: Despite the above, 1996 saw me bring to a close a further instalment of philosophical writings which rose above what I had already achieved in terms of the degree to which I was able to refine upon and perfect my concept of Truth, bringing to a head my quest for the most exactingly comprehensive and logically definitive text, a text both more thematically essential and structurally informal than ever before, and one which was to serve as a springboard to the two texts listed below.  Such, at any rate, is how these 'Omeganotes ...' now strike me, as I cast my mind back over the torturous paths that were to lead to the definitive realization of Truth and set me free of metaphysical uncertainties.

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Opus 67

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i>REVOLUTIONS OF AN IDEOLOGICAL PHILOSOPHER: One could regard this 1997 project as being conceptually similar to the OMEGANOTES... mentioned above, since it is no less essential and informal in structure, and just as thematically exacting in the extent to which philosophical comprehensiveness is achieved at the expense of partisan or partial perspectives.  But it is also deeper and more radical in its scope, bringing my philosophy to an all-time peak, as we progress from cycle to cycle in what is, by any standards, a consummate resolution of the contending elements.

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Opus 68

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i>REVELATIONS OF AN IDEOLOGICAL PHILOSOPHER: Also written in 1997 and originally intended as a sequel to the above, this work continues the cyclical progressions from approximately where they left off in the previous text, with, however, greater depth and philosophical insight, such that completes a loose trilogy of works sharing a similar compositional structure.

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Opus 69

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i>THE IDEOLOGICAL PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL TRANSCENDENTALISM: Structurally following on from the above, this work enlarges on the scope and content of the aforementioned works, as we are made aware of the extent to which Social Transcendentalism is both ideological and philosophical, that is to say practical and theoretical, serving not merely as a vehicle for Truth, but also, and no less significantly, as a catalyst for radical social change.

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Opus 70

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i>DEISTIC DELIVERANCE VIA SOCIAL TRANSCENDENTALISM: Also penned in 1997, this work - originally and somewhat over-politically entitled 'Deistic Liberation' - returns us to a more thematically-oriented cyclical structure of philosophizing, as it passes beyond a number of formative stages to a definitive working-out of the ideological philosophy of Social Transcendentalism in relation to both psychology and psyche, as they impact upon and are in turn conditioned by both physiological and elemental factors.

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Opus 71

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i>ULTRANOTES FROM BEYOND ('The United Kingdom/Ireland'): Abandoning cycles, this collection of what, in relation to earlier 'notational' integrities, I am wont to regard as ultra-notational aphorisms, brings to a resounding conclusion my quest for philosophical perfection, as it addresses a variety of Social Transcendentalist concerns in relation to 'Kingdom Come', not the least of which being the salvation of what I have called Subchristians from theocracy, and the correlative presentation of a meritocratic alternative to all forms of religious tradition.

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Opus 72

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i>THE SOUL OF BEING: Conceived in continuous aphoristic terms, this 1998 text is nevertheless divided into twelve sections, each of which bears a headed title in quasi-essayistic vein.  Examples of such titles include 'Fair to Life', 'Collective and Individual', 'Self vis-à-vis Not-Self', 'Form and Content(ment)', and 'Metaphysical Salvation'.  There is also, at the end, a fairly long appendix which has the merit, not uncharacteristic of my appendices, of both summing up the text and, in this particular case, illustrating the reculer pour mieux sauter, or stepping back in order to leap forward, attitude which underlines much of the foregoing philosophy.  Certainly this text goes deeper than the previous one ever did, in terms of its understanding of the self and the methodology of self-actualization or realization by which the bridge from ego to soul is crossed.

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Opus 73

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i>THE CORE OF THE SELF: Continuing on from above, this further text in my philosophical or, as I now prefer to think of it, superphilosophical journey brings us, via twenty-three headed sections numbered afresh in each case, to the 'Core of the Self', the 'Holy Grail' of self-fulfilment which lies at journey's end as its heavenly reward.  Although principally concerned, like the previous text, with the self, this work does more justice to the totality of the self, including, for virtually the first time, the id, which it analyses both in relation to the self as a whole and to modern society, with particular reference to the West.  The id, however, is not the 'Holy Grail' of self-fulfilment for me but, rather, the antithesis of the soul which needs to be guarded against and, if possible, transcended in favour of that path which truly leads to the 'Core of the Self'.  Let the reader judge for himself as to the success of my journey and the sincerity of my conclusions!

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Opus 74

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i>THE KINGDOM OF THE SOUL: With implications that stretch into 'Kingdom Come', this text adds one or two fresh ideas to the above, as well as highlighting the extent to which kingdoms, when genuine, are commensurate with one or another extreme of the self.  The extreme I favour is, of course, alluded to in the title, and it is one that I believe could have wider application than simply to the British Isles, as described in the text.

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Opus 75

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i>TERMINOLOGICAL DICTIONARY OF SOCIAL TRANSCENDENTALISM: Conceived in alphabetical order, this 'dictionary' of my philosophy ranges from A - Z in what is arguably the most thematically comprehensive and structurally definitive of all my texts, one that not only sums up the ideological philosophy of Social Transcendentalism but still manages to refine upon and remodel, in typical cyclic vein, some of the accepted wisdom of the past, as well - dare I say - as add new material to the overall corpus of philosophical ideas.

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Opus 76

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i>THE TRIUMPH OF BEING: No sooner had I completed the above-mentioned TERMINOLOGICAL DICTIONARY ... than a seismic shift occurred in my thinking not only in regard to the subject of morality, about which I had theorized on a somewhat different basis in the past, but also, and more importantly, with regard to such concepts as 'superman', 'supermasculine', 'supernatural', and so on, which, in long-standing deference to Nietzsche, I had previously taken too much for granted.  Now, with a deeper concept of nature, I was in a position to revaluate such terms and effectively displace them from what had been a metaphysical perch, setting up a new evaluation for that which sensibly pertains to the divine.  The result, not surprisingly, may come as a shock to those who had supposed me too set in a Nietzschean mould.

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Opus 77

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i>BEYOND IMAGINATION: This is another high-point in a long and winding philosophical career which has led this pilgrim, inexorably, towards the 'celestial city' of heavenly truth and thus towards the omega point of his oeuvre, wherein many subjects are explored afresh and one or two long-standing assumptions or presumptions summarily abandoned.  Certainly the title was based on conclusions I had reached about the religiously undesirable nature of imagery, imagination, and other such appearance-based variations on a common metachemical theme, from the standpoint of philosophical essence.

 

 

Opus 78

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i>BRINGING THE JUDGEMENT: This delves deeper into the distinction between primacy and supremacy, the inorganic and the organic, than any of my previous texts, and arrives at conclusions which make it impossible to underestimate the part played by contemporary urban civilization in the destruction, through environmental and technological factors, of inner harmony and peace.  Fortunately a solution to the problem is offered, but it is not one that is likely to ingratiate those for whom contemporary materialism is an end-in-itself rather than something to reject in the interests of self-respect.  The 'judgement', however, has yet to come.

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Opus 79

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i>THE TOTALITY OF NATURE: Each time I write a new book or, rather, word disc, it is as though it were the literary equivalent of a music CD, with a number of titles that, by and large, are independent of each other and which encourage one to proceed from one subject to another in what is invariably a cyclical progression.  In this particular project there are some twenty cycles, all of which are self-sufficient and yet also interrelated in what becomes a bigger picture of an overall philosophy stretching ever further omega-wards, as it were, in the quest for ultimate truth and perfection.  I needn't elaborate on any of the subjects here, because most of them will have been explored to some degree in my work before, but I doubt whether I have ever written or, rather, composed, methodically and meticulously, anything better, least of all in relation to the complex philosophical and moral problems posed by the distinction of 'right' and 'wrong', which here undergoes what I believe to be a morally definitive presentation.

 

 

Opus 80

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i>THE PROMISE OF 'KINGDOM COME': Similar to the above in structure but more consciously tailored to the space limitations of aural CD transcription, this work proceeds through nine cycles with titles ranging from 'The Wisdom of Sensible Truth' to 'Saving and/or Damning from the World'.  Not all of it, however, is profoundly philosophic, and some lighter material is certainly provided by 'Bottles, Cans, and Beakers', arguably one of my most thought-provoking cycles!

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Opus 81

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i>THE RIGHT TO SANITY: Yet another cyclical text of aphoristic purism which goes to the roots of Western insanity and offers both an explanation of and alternative to the dilemma of what I call the paradoxical primacy afflicting modern society which, granting undue prominence to the inorganic, has the effect of twisting moral and other evaluations towards an anti-natural perspective in which ugliness passes for beauty and falsity for truth, to name but two categories.  Also of especial note in this text is an attack on what the author likes to think of as the delusion of curved space in relation to spatial space, and his solution not only to the nature of space as something divisible between straight and curved, but to the division of time, volume, and mass along similar gender-based, albeit element-conditioned, lines.

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Opus 82

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i>MAGNUS DEI:  With a title that is obviously a pun on 'Agnus Dei', this eighteenth example of my cyclical philosophy expands on the above to embrace a deeper analysis of the distinction between 'right' and 'wrong', or immorality and morality, and does so in relation to a number of dichotomous contexts, including sensuality and sensibility, competition and cooperation, insanity and sanity, race and culture.  In fact, this text delves into the racial dichotomy between Nordic and Celtic and seeks to deduce certain moral distinctions between the two races, as well as to compare them with the generality of darker races on this planet from what the author contends, on the basis of metaphorical illustrations, to be a higher racial standpoint.  Not least of the subjects under investigation here is the distinction between immanence and transcendence, which few thinkers would seem to have treated with the subtlety and profundity it deserves.

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Opus 83

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i>OPUS D'OEUVRE: With subjects that range from modern architecture and myth to the relationship of sensuality to sensibility and the evolution of media technology, this text is sufficiently variegated to be of general interest even if it did not contain material which expands on the above - as, for example, race - and is instantly recognizable in relation to the nature and development of my philosophy within an elemental structure which not only evaluates things or situations from a standpoint based in the four elements, but embraces a moral evaluation of them on both sensual and sensible terms in either inorganic or organic contexts.  This text certainly does that to a conclusive degree, and a fuller understanding of some subjects, including literature, the Arts in general, and the relationship of science to religion or of politics to economics, would not be possible without such a comprehensive perspective which, whilst doing justice to every element or subject discussed, never looses track of its priorities and the goal that such a philosophy inexorably leads to when, as here, a proper moral and ideological evaluation of the various options has been systematically undertaken and achieved.

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Opus 84

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i>PATHWAYS TO 'THE KINGDOM': Composed in part of an overspill from the above and also of several fresh cycles, this short text expands on the relationship between sin and grace on the one hand and crime and punishment on the other by incorporating, in more detail than ever before, anthropomorphic distinctions between Father and Son in the one case, and Daughter and Mother in the other, showing how such symbols can be applied to religion and what the consequences are when they are seen in a religious light.  Also of especial importance here is the correction which I was at last able to make concerning an old phrase ('salvation from sins and/or punishments of the world') that had been taken for granted in certain previous texts but was dealt its final death-blow here in what, with its philosophical consistency and greater profundity, I like to think of as my ultimate cyclical work.

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Opus 85

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i>PRIVATE OBSERVATIONS - 'Personal and Universal': Here, at last, is a much more informal and even relaxed work which enabled me to lay one or two old autobiographical ghosts to rest while still continuing to haunt the realm of philosophy in no uncertain metaphysical terms.  In fact, it may be that this further 2001 project enabled me to lay one or two long-standing philosophical ghosts to rest as well, since I did not shy away from a fresh look at some old theories and was duly rewarded, I think, by a new perspective on certain things which I had begun to take - foolishly or naively - for granted, even though my previous treatment of them had been anything but conventional or standard.  I believe that courage is its own reward, and that he who dares to venture where none has gone before deserves the beneficial consequences, whatever they may be.  All I can say is that in this text certain very complicated and even paradoxical philosophical and moral issues have been tackled afresh and solved, to the best of my ability, in a way and with a structural comprehensiveness which leaves very little room for dissent.  In that, I think I have achieved, with a text that went on to become more universal than personal, far more than I could possibly have hoped for at the beginning!

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Opus 86

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i>THE MYTH OF EQUALITY: Reworking much of the material contained in the above, this text goes deeper into the distinction between gender-conditioned forms of culture and civilization, as well as develops a more comprehensive perspective on sin and grace on the one hand, and crime and punishment on the other, specifically with regard to a distinction between nature and psyche in both sensuality and sensibility.  Also of special note here is the departure from previous ascriptions of will, spirit, ego, and soul to each gender in favour of the modification of psyche attendant upon a natural bias and, conversely, the modification of nature attendant upon a bias for psyche.  All in all, THE MYTH OF EQUALITY succeeds in bringing my philosophy to an inequalitarian and very pluralistic head, such that confirms the desirability of elemental comprehensiveness on both class- and gender-conditioned terms.

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Opus 87

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i>FREEDOM AND DETERMINISM - 'The Gender Agenda': Building on the greater comprehensiveness achieved above, this text returns us to the concept of the triadic Beyond and explains the distinction, hitherto unstressed, between primary and secondary forms of both salvation and damnation, according to denominational predisposition and gender affiliation, within the subdivisions of any given tier.  It also builds upon the dichotomy between nature and psyche in both sensuality and sensibility to explain in greater detail why either nature conditions psyche or, more sensibly, psyche conditions nature.  Of course, the author openly acknowledges the extent to which gender factors-in to the distinction between free nature and free psyche, but suggests that, through environmental progress, we have the ability to change the relationship of the one to the other in the interests of a more sensible outcome.  Finally, he reaffirms his opposition to religious affiliations based on psychic determinism and argues in favour of the environmental justification for an ultimate religious manifestation, within the triadic framework alluded to above, of psychic freedom, simultaneously restating the terms and means by which this may officially be brought to pass.

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Opus 88

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i>POINT OMEGA POINT - 'The Omega Standpoint': This directly follows on from the above text not only with a deeper understanding of the distinction between Nature and Civilization, but with greater insight into the division within both Nature and Civilization of sensual and sensible alternatives, as well as with a wider interpretation of Nature and Civilization such that brings a more exactingly comprehensive perspective to bear on each, whilst still adhering to a specific civilized bias, as before.  But as well as an enlargement of perspective which allows for a sharp differentiation between the natural and the man-made, there is an enhancement of logic such that clarifies the issues of salvation and damnation as never before, so that there can be no doubt as to the issues involved and on what basis a sensible alternative to a sensual predominance must be achieved, if it is to be achieved.  In this respect, the distinction between freedom and binding, so characteristic of various earlier texts, is less symptomatic of the one or the other than of both sensual and sensible contexts, if with vastly different emphases, as described in some detail in what is, by any accounts, the most lucidly and logically consistent apologetics for an omega alternative to an alpha-besotted decadence and/or barbarity that could be imagined.  Finally, I have to say that the appendix is virtually as significant as the work itself in the way in which it brings to a long-overdue head a dichotomy which until quite recently I hadn't realized was expressive of a generalization but which at last, in rather more than Kantian or Schopenhauerian fashion, I was able to utilize in both concrete and abstract, natural and psychic realms on terms which do it altogether more specific contextual justice - the dichotomy, I mean, between the phenomenal and the noumenal which, at long last, I have decided to bring into line with that elemental comprehensiveness for which, I hope, my philosophy will be esteemed in times to-come.

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Opus 89

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i>THE OMEGA POINT OF CULTURAL TRUTH: The real point of this philosophical text becomes obvious enough as we proceed ever more comprehensively through the elements and their various subdivisions, and discover the actual basis of the distinction between soma (formerly nature) and psyche and of how they exist, according to gender, on both primal and supreme terms.  In fact, this text tightens-up on so many of the theories and findings which preceded it that it would be difficult to imagine anything tighter and effectively more definitive in relation to them, since it provides logical evidence for the distinction between profanity and sanctity as applying not merely to men, much less women, but also to gods and devils, as explained in some detail.  Yet it also drives home the real point of cultural truth, contrasting it not merely with the moral bankruptcy of civilized knowledge, but with the agonizingly annihilating prospect of those secular realities which hang over the contemporary world in self-denying philistinism and are likely to claim ever more victims as time goes by, unless the alternative I have suggested, and advocated all along, is democratically put in place and permitted to develop in the logical unfolding of an evolutionary solution to the problem of Man (as defined in the text).  For modern Man is a problem, not a solution, and until his reign is officially consigned to the rubbish bin of world history, it is impossible to see a brighter future for mankind in general, the sort of future outlined in the above title which is but the final player in the game of life.

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Opus 90

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i>ALPHA AND OMEGA - 'Beginning and End': This work, divided into four evenly-structured parts, takes a closer look at such age-old questions as to whether mind precedes matter or matter precedes mind, and answers them in a way which does equal justice to both, as well as throws new light upon the distinction between 'the Father' and 'the Son' which amounts, for me, to a complete rejection of my previous standpoint and a reappraisal of their respective standings on the basis of a logically incontrovertible insight such that I had been building towards all along, not least of all in relation to the dissimilar ratios and significances attaching to soma and psyche according to gender.  It is this work above all others that, when the contents of all four parts have been taken into account and their conclusions carefully analysed, will expose the humbug of conventional wisdom and morally challenge all who would stand in the way of evolutionary progress and seek to undermine that very sharp distinction between right and wrong, honesty and cowardice, sincerity and hypocrisy, truth and lies. 

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Opus 91

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i>VALUATIONS OF A SOCIAL TRANSCENDENTALIST: Carrying on the multipart style of writing of the above, this text is divisible into three six-chapter parts entitled 'Revaluations', 'Evaluations', and 'Transvaluations', and therefore approaches the task outlined in the title from three different standpoints, albeit without undue inflexibility or too methodical a distinction between them.  Nevertheless the result, overall, isn’t logically displeasing, and each part has something new and different to offer, not least of all the third, which is closer to the 'transcendentalism' of the ideological title than to its 'social' aspect in the way the emphasis has been placed on transvaluating; that is, on shifting the concept of various notions or ideals or realities from alpha to omega, soma to psyche, not-self to self, in the interests of a transvaluation of society along lines likely if not guaranteed to lead to the sort of positive outcomes which I have identified with virtue and, hence, morality, as befitting an alternative kind of society to that which generally prevails at present, and not only in countries or contexts where it is demonstrably official, but also wherever it exists unofficially in consequence of the overwhelming influences and pressures which have been brought to bear on virtually all Western societies by their more powerful neighbours.  Nevertheless this text is by no means defeatist but, on the contrary, cautiously optimistic as to the prospect of some kind of alternative dispensation, broadly identified with 'Kingdom Come', for the future.  With certain revaluations of previous philosophical positions taken by me and a number of fresh evaluations also included along with these transvaluations, I feel that I can confidently claim to have finally reached the omega point of my oeuvre, and thus satisfied my claim to messianic credibility, whatever others may think.

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Opus 92

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i>TOTAL TRUTH: Here at last, in this four-part work, is the actual omega point of my philosophical oeuvre as far as the achievement of a definitive insight into the relationship of freedom to binding in both sensual and sensible contexts is concerned, with an enhanced sense of the distinction between a variety of terms that may previously have been used interchangeably or as equivalents.  Here, too, I can safely claim to have done more justice to the conflicting relationships between the individual and society than in previous texts, as well as developed a superior understanding as to the desirability of universal culture in the service of genuine religion for a world that needs to reject its factual and/or illusory shortcomings if civilization is to attain to its omega point in the blessedness of sensible freedom and be truly at peace with itself.

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Opus 93

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i>ETHNIC UNVIERSALITY - 'The Next Totalitarianism': Once again I must swallow my words and put aside claims to any given work being the 'omega point of my oeuvre', for this text takes my philosophy to an even more definitive level in relation to those  attributes of each of the elements which make will, spirit, ego, and soul possible and jostle for primacy or supremacy, according to the context, in individuals both separately and collectively, in civilization as a reflection of one sort of society or another, depending on a variety of factors, not least of all environmental.  But this text is equally definitive in relation to its understanding of people's civilization and why, despite appearances to the contrary or what anybody might say, such a largely urban civilization, built around the proletariat, can only be totalitarian and is, even now, totalitarian in what most characterizes it and what the author holds to be the precondition of an ultimate totalitarianism, as alluded to in the title, which will take this civilization to its omega point and therefore definitive realization.

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Opus 94

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i>NO MAN-OEUVRE: Conceived on the more informal basis of the above text, this title lays down the case for godly rights in relation to the development of globalization to its universal summation, and contends, with the aid of comprehensive logical structures which stretch through the elements (in general terms) from cosmic and natural to human and divine, that since godliness has still not attained to its per se manifestation there is no reason to regard such godliness as has and does obtain as the end of the religious road but, rather, to see how religion still has to develop beyond its traditional structures if God is to supersede and, in a sense, supplant man as the logical outcome of historical development and, indeed, evolution.  To that end, it has been part of the duty of this text to de-bunk conventional religion, both Western and especially Eastern, in order to demonstrate that all religions leave something to be desired from the standpoint of true universality in relation to the final development of religion, of soulful totalitarianism, in genuinely global terms.

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Opus 95

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i>THE HIGH-WAY OF TRUTH: Following on from the above, this companion text takes a closer look at people's civilization as it bears upon the development of globalization, and distinguishes between national and international forms of 'people's ideology' in a way that seeks to demonstrate that even here a 'gender war' is in operation which pits not only Fascism against Communism and Socialism against Capitalism but the female forms of Fascism and Socialism against their male counterparts and, conversely, the male forms of Capitalism and Communism against their female counterparts, with interesting implications for the future development of ideology as bearing upon the most logically desirable outcome of such dialectical struggles in relation to the most universally credible form of globalization.  As a corollary of this, one is left in no doubt that the people who count for most within the framework of globalization are more likely to be atheistically opposed to traditional and conventional religion than staunch believers in their deities and even in such flawed notions as the Second Coming, their own entitlement to godliness - and hence religion - being a matter of future judgement when they are able to come into their religious own in consequence of their willingness to take their global destiny to its universal conclusion.

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Opus 96

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i>THE END OF EVOLUTION: This text brings my theorizing to a very absolutist head that refines upon the pluralistic consistency of what has preceded it in relation to the administrative aside to and the triadic Beyond of 'Kingdom Come', as described in earlier texts.  For the trend of globalization towards a unitive peak in a more genuine universality at the expense of both Western and Eastern traditions alike presages a transcendentalist  resolution which cannot but be equally, if not more, absolutist, and thus beyond both humanistic/nonconformist relativity and fundamentalist absolutism.  Such, then, is the import of this text as it develops its revolutionary message for the proletariat and enters into a more complete solidarity with proletarian internationalism than might have been expected even as recently as a few years ago.   In this respect, too, it signifies a worthy component in the long struggle for Truth which has characterized this oeuvre over several decades of consistent philosophizing with the end of a revolutionary transformation of society always in mind.

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Opus 97

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i>THE VIRTUOUS CIRCLES: This further text in the ever-advancing oeuvre achieves a more comprehensive understanding and delineation of both the convolutional realities of female hegemonic contexts, regarded as vicious circles, and the involutional realities or, rather, idealities of male hegemonic contexts, regarded as virtuous circles, and therefore as bearing upon the title in terms of a positive alternative to and solution of  the problem, from a male standpoint, of the vicious circles which are established whenever somatic freedoms take precedence over their psychic counterparts, as in all heathenistic or secular societies.  It is also subtler in its understanding of the distinctions between binding and pseudo-freedom as a precondition of genuine freedom, whether for better, in respect of psyche, or for worse, in respect of soma.  There is also a certain religiously-oriented terminological comprehensiveness, mirroring the above-mentioned circles, which does maximum justice to the various metaphors which are convenient shorthand for gender and class realities and idealities in both sensuality and sensibility, thereby leaving absolutely no room for doubt as to the significance and status of such metaphorical terms, irrespective as to which stage of life, from cosmic to suprahuman (cyborg), they can be variously applied.  Therefore with careful study there should be no doubt as to the applicability or significance of these definitions, or how to distinguish between them on an underlying descriptive basis.  In that respect, this text achieves a logical definitiveness which it would be difficult if not impossible to improve upon, and may justifiably be regarded as the intellectual culmination-point of my philosophical oeuvre to-date.

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Opus 98

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i>THE STRUGGLE FOR ULTIMATE FREEDOM: I ought by now to have learnt my lesson in respect to the sort of claim made above about definitive texts but, frankly, some further philosophical progress has been made, if in regard to a revaluation - evaluating and revaluating being germane to the cyclical structures of my work - of a quite long-standing evaluation concerning devolution, which only confirms that intellectual progress happens by degrees and is a long and often tortuous process during the course of which new insights and logical configurations come to light which enable one to re-address an old contention or, in this case, bone of contention, to a more satisfactory resolution.... Which does not mean that progress towards some definitive position is not possible or is simply a delusion, as some would have us believe, but that it takes time and involves many rethinks and revaluations along the way such that only a very brave and honest type of person, more likely male and not overly concerned with commercial viability or attractiveness, would be capable of undertaking, given all the complexities involved.  Nevertheless further progress or perhaps I should say redress has emerged here, in this well-nigh definitive text, and it is to my cyclical credit that I have been able to recycle old material and thereby fashion something new, not least in respect of a more developed concept of religious freedom which will require the ideological subordination and even democratic supersession of political freedoms if globalization is ultimately to emerge in a more credibly universal guise - a contention which, although touched upon before, here achieves something like a definitive presentation.

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Opus 99

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i>APOTHEOSIS OF THE GNOSIS: If anything seems like a definitive text it is this, which enabled me to draw the various strands of my philosophy together and to enunciate my worldview with such logical consistency and comprehensive exactitude ... that I felt as though nothing significant had been overlooked and there was even room for one or two long-standing grudges and resentments to be aired in the interests of enhanced credibility.  This, to me, is akin to a Seventh Heaven, for it is in actuality the seventh text in the series of similarly-structured aphoristic works stemming from ETHNIC UNIVERSALITY, the titular independence of all of which is designed to maintain a sense of and commitment to individualism in the wake of the rather more closely-collectivized and structurally-integrated texts which, divided into book-like parts, came to a head with TOTAL TRUTH; What has come to a head here, with APOTHEOSIS OF THE GNOSIS, is a sense of freedom which owes more to theocracy than to democracy but could not materialize, in any ultimate form, without the assistance of democracy.  That, in itself, is not new to my work, but the way it has been described and the extent to which I have exposed the penalties of not embracing psychic freedom more absolutely is really quite something else, not least in respect of the covert subversion of male virtues by female moralities in sensibility which is the price to be paid in the absence of a more complete freedom.

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Opus 100

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i>ESCHATOLOGY OR SCATOLOGY - 'Judgement at the Crossroads': One can take humble or vulgar means, including slang or casual obscenity, and seek to develop them philosophically in such a way that things come to light that would otherwise probably have remained buried and hidden from view.  Sometimes it were better that such things did remain buried, but if one can bear to contemplate them and grow to understand them better, then the reward is not insubstantial but arguably well worth the trouble.  So it has been here, and in this final individualized instalment of homogeneously-structured aphoristic texts I have come full-circle, as it were, and highlighted a significant distinction between the two types of people's radicalism which all those of a progressively unworldly or extreme left-wing persuasion have to choose between, often unconsciously and according to the kind of society or civilization in which they find themselves or to which they relate - namely the Social Theocracy of the highroad and the Social Democracy of the low road, the former incontrovertibly determined to bring one aspect of the world to Heaven, the latter just as incontrovertibly determined, so far as I am concerned, to bring a neo-diabolical mode of Hell to the other aspect of the world, though to find out which is which you will have to read the text and thus undertake a journey the likes of which you will never have taken before, one which may even overtake your prior expectations and leave you marvelling at the situation in which you then find yourself, for better or worse.

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Opus 101

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i>APOCALYPSO - 'The New Revelation':  Divided into four sections, this text carries on the task of highlighting the distinctions between Social Theocracy and Social Democracy, though always from a perspective favouring the former, and brings a fresh sense of exactitude to bear on a number of terms which have either been used interchangeably or in a more general way in the past, while simultaneously developing a more comprehensively exacting 'take' upon what pertains to free psyche and bound soma and what pertains, by contrast, to free soma and bound psyche, so that one need be in no doubt that criteria applicable to the former are largely if not completely irrelevant to the latter....Which is why I have developed a different set of terminological markers for each context, whether in respect of noumenal or phenomenal, upper- or lower-class criteria, so that there can be no ambiguity or ambivalence as to the sense in which these terms are being applied, and no justification, in consequence, for confusion over their use.  But the 'new revelation' alluded to in the subtitle has to do with more than specific terminological practice, no matter how comprehensively exacting, since it is a revelation, above all, about life and the means by which life can be enhanced in respect of the more than Christian order of salvation which is what Social Theocracy is really all about. 

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Opus 102

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i>AT THE CROSSROADS OF AXIAL DIVERGENCE: As suggested by the title, this text continues to explore the distinctions between what have been termed the bureaucratic-theocratic axis of a rising diagonal and the autocratic-democratic axis of a falling diagonal, and to do so in such a way that there can be no doubt as to the outcome of each axial progression, whether it be in respect of Social Theocracy or Social Democracy, with eschatological implications which give a contemporary  twist to the concept of Judgement and the consequences of what is at stake in any contest between the two axes, the divergent natures of which have been more comprehensively fleshed out here than in the preceding text.  But as anyone familiar with the preceding text or texts will agree, there can be only one path for the self-respecting righteous to follow, and such a path leads up and in rather than down and out. 

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Opus 103

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i>OPTI-MYSTIC PROJECTIONS: Although structurally and thematically similar to the above text, composed as ever of aphoristic notes, this work represents a quantum leap forward in certain areas which are explored more accurately and rigorously than ever before, progressing from a consideration of the distinctions between sacred and profane ego to the cultural and political differences between Europe and America, and of how Britain's attraction towards America undermines Europe and creates problems which even France cannot avoid being affected by, much as France differs from Britain in respect of its cultural and political traditions and should be judged, I believe, by criteria closer, in essence, to those obtaining in countries like Eire, where the influence of the Catholic Church is omnipresent.  But America is an altogether different proposition from France, never mind Eire, and its influence on Britain is such as to make one desirous of a radical change in the British Isles which will make it easier for any residual influence to be minimized or even marginalized in the interests of greater European unity and cooperation, a change which, as the reader may have guessed, points in the direction of Social Theocracy and its politico-religious aspirations, as outlined in previous texts, which besides embracing the supranational transcendence of the British/Irish divide include a more authentic order of religious transcendentalism as its raison d'être.  Finally, as a word of advice, one should not read this text before one has progressed, step by step, through all the preceding ones, but once one has read it one would probably incline, as I do, to regard it as the best thing I have ever written in terms of what projects furthest into a mystical, or metaphysically transcendent, future with the logical optimism which only loyalty to self can vouchsafe.

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Opus 104

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i>UNFLATTERING CONCLUSIONS: More than ever I should like this text to speak for itself, because it does not paint a flattering picture of Anglo-American relations vis-à-vis Europe as a whole and the world in general but strives to show not merely how but why the United Kingdom  is a problem for Europe and the prospect of greater European integration.  However, all problems tend to invite solutions, and my own solution to the problem of the UK vis-à-vis Europe in general but Eire in particular draws on my ideological legacy as a self-proclaimed Social Theocrat who, like the French philosopher Michel Foucault, is not only ranged against an overly Social Democratic 'take' on progress, but has an alternative path to offer which owes a lot more to European tradition than ever it does to the long-standing opponents of that tradition who would be among the last peoples, as things stand, to either understand or be able to tread this new path which, as far as I am concerned, is the path to universal harmony and therefore of an end to national divisions.

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Opus 105

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i>RADICAL PROGRESS - 'The Only Way Forward': As suggested by the title, this text has a concept of progress which is radical and far-reaching in its left-wing implications, albeit in relation to the sphere of religion rather than economics, which is the only sphere, so far as I am concerned, which can be genuinely progressive, provided, however, that the religion itself is genuine and therefore transcendentalist, stemming, as I have argued in the text, from an antihumanist precondition.  But that is only one axis, or diagonal, in the totality of axial factors at work in different kinds of societies, whether on a primary or a secondary basis, and in RADICAL PROGRESS I have gone into the distinctions between church hegemonic/state subordinate and state hegemonic/church subordinate societies in no uncertain terms, outlining the different ideals and fates which pertain to them with a logical consistency that leaves one in no doubt as to the relative value of each type of society, whether rising diagonally or falling diagonally, and making a conclusive case for the society that has the capacity to lead people higher rather than simply rule them from a height in opposition to something lower which is nevertheless distinct from the kind of lowness obtaining across the great divide of the world, as explained in this my most definitive and outstanding text to-date. 

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Opus 106

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i>STAIRWAY TO JUDGEMENT - 'The Way to the Eternal Life of Social Theocratic Truth': Continuing on from the above work, this text is not only more comprehensively exacting than the previous one - and indeed all the earlier works - in relation to the various ideological permutations of both state and church, politics and religion, but more logically insightful of the diametrically opposite ways in which what has been termed 'world overcoming' operates, whether from a secular or an ecclesiastical point of view, to the end of maintaining either the alpha ideal of somatic freedom from the standpoint of a female hegemony or the omega ideal of psychic freedom from the standpoint of a male hegemony, neither of which kinds of ideal, respectively criminal and graceful, are or ever can be compatible, and therefore necessitate and invariably result in contrary types of society which, for obvious reasons, rarely if ever 'see eye to eye' but remain at gender loggerheads with each other for as long as 'the world' persists.  The 'world' as defined in the text, however, is no simple monolith where the people are concerned but is divisible, on the above-mentioned basis, between those who take the earth for granted in what I have described as a democratic/plutocratic type of worldly bias and those, on the contrary, who live in hope of salvation from the world in what has been called a bureaucratic/meritocratic type of worldly bias which, scorning the earth, is avowedly anti-earthly in character and the precondition, through sin, of heavenly grace.  Therefore, split asunder between two types of worldly society, the people, 'the meek', the electorate, the many, etc., cannot be evaluated according to any one set of criteria but have to be differentiated on the basis of whether they pertain to the one manifestation of 'the world' or to the other, with contrary fates in both state and church, as described in this, my most ideologically conclusive text to-date. 

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Opus 107

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i>A PERFECT RESOLUTION: As suggested by the title, this text resolves some outstanding problems and anomalies appertaining to the preceding one, including not least the relative positions of what has been called pseudo-sin and pseudo-grace on the one hand and pseudo-crime and pseudo-punishment on the other hand, drawing them closer to their respective primary complements in both state and church, so that a more integrated conclusion has been reached in which the hegemonic gender of either axis, as redefined in this text, conditions the nature of the subordinate attribute in relation to the presiding ideal, and conditions it, moreover, in its own image.  However, this text does a lot more than correct the 'heathenistic' aberrations of the previous one; for it also exposes the extent to which criteria appertaining to good and evil, not to mention wisdom and folly, are significantly dependent on the nature of the society of which they are a part, so that at the end of the day it is not whether this or that is right or wrong, good or bad, but what exactly is conditioning people to take one view or another that really matters, and this, not surprisingly, is to a large extent dependent on which gender is effectively controlling society and whether or not there has been a 'transvaluation of values' sympathetic to a formal departure from sensuality to sensibility.  For what is 'right' in sensuality can become very 'wrong' from the standpoint of sensibility, provided society has officially gravitated to such a standpoint - something, I have argued, which contemporary civilization, characterized as urban proletarian, has yet to do, with consequences that would reverse much of what currently passes for 'good' and 'wise', as explained in the text.

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Opus 108

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i>THE LAST JUDGEMENT: Despite its portentous-sounding title, this work in the continuing oeuvre progresses through four sections in much the same way as the previous works and with all or most of the same concerns, except that its grasp of the distinction between soma and psyche, not-self and self, in relation to the divergent axes of state-hegemonic and church-hegemonic types of society is more consistent and methodical than had previously been the case, with a consequence that one can differentiate quite sharply between the somatic emphasis or bias of the one context in relation to evil and good and the psychic bias or emphasis of the other context in relation to sin and grace - something that puts a new complexion on the corresponding complements of crime and punishment on the one hand and of folly and wisdom on the other hand.  However, it must be said, in relation to the title, that if we are to accept a Last Judgement, we are obliged to acknowledge a First Judgement; for no less than God the Father logically obliges us to come to terms with the contrary existence of Devil the Mother, so Judgement, conceived in this fashion, compels us to distinguish between alpha and omega, metachemistry and metaphysics, in terms of antiphysical and antichemical alternatives which have applicability to our own age and civilization in a way which leaves no doubt as to the significance of gender in bringing such contrary concepts to pass.  For here as elsewhere, nothing can be understood without reference to the axial divergence which follows from the hegemony of this gender or that gender, making for a sharp distinction between alpha and omega, the first and the last, whether in respect of Judgement or of anything else.

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Opus 109

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i>THE FREE TESTAMENT OF A BOUND GENIUS: Beginning with doubts about a certain number too often used in religious connections, this text progresses through a development of my own religious theories and numbers towards a conclusion which, while not entirely removed from the magical number cited at the beginning, endorses a rather larger figure when once the numbers attaching to my divisions and subdivisions of each axis - descending and ascending, female and male - have been multiplied by four in relation to what has been regarded as the principal stages of both death and life as applying in previous texts to element-conditioned environmental means, from the Cosmos and nature to mankind and cyborgkind, the latter of which is already here, if rather more on sensual than sensible terms at present.  Nevertheless, this text is about a lot more than numbers, however significant or insignificant one chooses to regard them, being an extension and refinement of my recent axial theorizing which, frankly, leaves little or nothing to be desired - at least not in terms of the way and extent to which everything adds up in what must be a definitive comprehensiveness that takes my philosophy-cum-theosophy to an all-time peak, and establishes if not proves, once and for all, my pre-eminence as arguably the foremost metaphysical thinker not only of this age but of virtually any age, a self-thought thinker whose corporeal existence remains bound even as his largely ethereal thoughts range freely over the entire compass of devolutionary and evolutionary actuality or possibility, from the alpha-most point of Devil the Mother/Hell the Clear Spirit to the omega-most point of God the Father/Heaven the Holy Soul.

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Opus 110

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i>REVELATIONARY AFTERTHOUGHTS: Stemming in large measure from the above text, this work restates in greater detail many of the principal contentions of my recent philosophy and arrives at some new conclusions which render it all the more logically unassailable and entitled to be regarded as the criterion by which not only contemporary morality but the distinction between morality and immorality, the light and the dark, should be judged, even if this does mean that some or many of one's treasured illusions should ultimately be discarded in order that the light of truth may shine through in as unimpeded and unequivocal a way as possible.  Frankly, I had no idea, when I tentatively began this text, that it would blossom into what is unquestionably the most eloquent and comprehensively exacting presentation of my philosophy so far, a presentation that has the right to be called revelationary in that much of what it reveals is so compellingly cogent as to be positively divine, the divine revelations of a thinker who knows the difference between God and the Devil but does not make the reductionist mistake of conceiving of history, much less life, as a struggle between Good and Evil when all the philosophical evidence points to the conclusion that good is merely the relative counterpart of Evil and no more than a just retort to something which is not merely antithetical to anything godly but the principal obstacle to the salvation of the sinful to that which, gracefully transcending the world, is as far removed from being engaged in any such struggle as it is possible to imagine, but not, on that account, indifferent to the plight of the meek.

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Opus 111

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i>REVOLUTIONARY AFTERTHOUGHTS: Dealing with essentially the same subject-matter as its companion text above, this work is even more exactingly insightful in its understanding of the differences between the Eternal freedoms that rule or lead and the temporal bindings that submit, in worldly fashion, to the alternative dispensations so antithetically ranged above them, whether in contemporary or traditional guise.  Here there is no question but that the worldly division between what has been called the meek and the just is symptomatic of two entirely different and largely independent axial orientations, an ascending axis of church-hegemonic criteria and a descending axis of state-hegemonic criteria, and that the salvation of those who meekly pertain to the former is crucial to the undermining if not, eventually, complete invalidation of the latter, but that salvation, for it to work, must be conceived on higher and more radical terms than has ever before characterized the diagonally ascending axis if the meek, as defined in the text, are to be more lastingly and efficaciously delivered not only from their own worldly limitations but from the sorts of netherworldly predations to which, via those limitations, they are perforce subjected by the Vain, or those who rule the just to their mutual exploitative and immoral advantage.  As in all my works, there is both further logical progress and, in the achievement of such progress, the necessary correction, from time to time, of previous contentions, and this work is no exception, all the more gratifyingly so in that what it has progressed to is nothing short of an unequivocal endorsement of a truth that dares to speak its name because it is genuinely universal and capable of resolving, once and for all, the dilemma of worldly division.

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Opus 112

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i>JUDGEMENTAL AFTERTHOUGHTS: This text brings to a 'judgemental' head a loose quartet of works beginning with THE FREE TESTAMENT OF A BOUND GENIUS, and has been subtitled 'As Testamentary Evidence of a Free Genius', since it rather departs from the terminological bounds set by the other work, not to mention the two intervening ones, as it explores, in some detail, the use and applicability of common slang and verb-noun expletives from a comprehensively exacting philosophical standpoint, with many interesting and novel conclusions, some of which might well contribute towards undermining the mindless alacrity with which certain persons go about denigrating others in carnally reductionist terms.  Therefore I have, in a sense, 'judged' such terms, however irrational their common usage, and, I trust, brought some logical sense to bear on them, thereby removing them from the pit of vulgar or obscene slang in which they tend, with unthinking people, to languish.  But that is not all I have done in this highly demanding text; for the reader will soon discern that I have a gift for parables and metaphorical irony which should shed some light on recent history and the contemporary political scene most especially, thereby preparing the ground for progressive radical change in the decades and  centuries to come.  Finally, I have returned to one of my favourite subjects, which might be described as the ideological or ontological understanding of literature in respect of its four principal branches, viz. drama, poetry, prose, and philosophy, and have, with the assistance of my customary elemental and axial theories (here brought to a veritable apotheosis), endeavoured to shed some light on their differences, in both gender and class terms, thereby indicating the path which leads not only to the understanding of literature in a deeper and wider sense but, hopefully, to its eventual overcoming on the most synthetically artificial basis, with especial reference to philosophy of the utmost truth-oriented order which, with me, attains to an all-time peak of metaphysical perfection which should suffice to expose the poetic half-truths and perhaps, indirectly, see off the dramatic lies and prosaic half-lies in the difficult but interesting times ahead.

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Opus 113

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i>FATHER OMEGA'S LAST TESTAMENT: Despite its slightly ironic title, this text is perfectly serious in its most exactingly comprehensive analysis of the four main elementally-conditioned class/gender contexts which have been described as noumenally sensual, phenomenally sensual, phenomenally sensible, and noumenally sensible, the first and third of which form an axial integrity on a diagonally descending basis and the second and fourth of which such an integrity on a diagonally ascending one, so that they divide into two types of society which, as in previous works, have been characterized as either state-hegemonic and church-subordinate or church-hegemonic and state-subordinate.  Therefore each of these contexts is more complex than the initial terminology might suggest, because further divisible between male and female elemental positions which in turn subdivide into psychic and somatic aspects which conform to either church or state on what has been described as primary or secondary terms, depending on which gender is hegemonic in any given context, be it upper- or lower-class, in sensuality or in sensibility.  Consequently our four basic contexts quickly mutate into eight positions that further subdivide along somatic and psychic lines, each of which is subdivisible between will and spirit in the case of soma and ego and soul in the case of psyche, as described in previous texts but not, I believe, with the same logical authority as comes to light here and reveals, for the first time, just how interdependent state and church can be for better or worse, depending on the axis.  The conclusions that have been drawn, however, are not such that any self-respecting person could quibble with; for they point to a solution to the problem of contemporary state-hegemonic civilization which would return civilization, in duly transmuted church-hegemonic  guise, to its true stature as something worthy of the utmost respect for its moral insight and accomplishments.  

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Opus 114

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i>REVALUAIONS AND TRANSVALUATIONS: This text not only revaluates certain positions recently postulated in my philosophical works, and therefore corrects or modifies their conclusions, but extends my transvaluating towards a totally new understanding and conception of Christianity and what logically followed it, so that the path is prepared, as it were, for the revelations concerning religion and the destiny of the phenomenally sensual 'meek' which owe more to this transvaluation than ever they do to any conventional or traditional notions concerning such subjects as the Immaculate Conception, the Crucifixion, the Resurrection, and, indeed, the entire belief system of Christianity in respect of a Second Coming and Day of Judgement.  In the end, what transpires is a revaluation of Christianity in light of my mature philosophy and its Social Theocratic commitment to Truth of an ultimate order which exposes the errors that stem from presumption of the death of God on the Cross and lead, inevitably, towards a humanistic dead-end.  I also expose the limitations of terms like 'mankind' and 'man' in relation to the full-gamut of class and gender possibilities which actually exist and condition or characterize life from one standpoint or another, and show more fully how things actually divide into two axes which are not only divisible in themselves but antithetical in virtually every respect, even in regard to sport and sex, on both somatic and psychic, state- and church-oriented terms.  In sum, this important text not only revaluates a number of important philosophical contentions on my part, making for a new and better understanding of ideological distinctions between 'Left' and 'Right' and of how amorality factors in to the opposition between immorality and morality in such fashion that they are never strictly polar, but extends my thinking towards a culmination-point which is the fruit of both a correct premise and an ability to transvaluate certain presumptions concerning God and man which turns things around and enables one to make sense out of the historical struggles leading, as it were, from the 'Garden of Eden' to the world and from the world, hopefully, to 'Kingdom Come', as reinterpreted from a standpoint firmly centred in an ultimate transvaluation, the product of all previous revaluations.

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Opus 115

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i>THE CLASSLESS SOLUTION: As it follows on from the above, this text is bound to restate many of the philosophical positions and contentions already taken, but it does so with even greater certitude and a more exactingly comprehensive assessment of the various components of the total picture which leaves one in no doubt that something philosophically definitive has been achieved, and that any further revaluations or transvaluations are only likely to happen in relation to that which is already broadly or essentially true, not contrary to it.  Yet even then that would not be entirely the case, for this text still manages to refine on and even to modify certain of the contentions or positions taken above, not least in respect of the evaluation of class on a more axially specific basis which helps, I believe, to clarify the distinctions between noumenal and phenomenal, noble and plebeian, in such fashion that one could never again accept anything less comprehensively exacting for gospel or fail to understand just how different the two axial positions really are.... As in the case, for example, of their contrary social and moral fates, not least in respect of salvation and damnation, and who or what is saved or damned, counter-damned or counter-saved, and how that should be morally or socially interpreted.  But I would be understating the achievements of this text if, quite apart from its contribution to our understanding of literature from a more axially comprehensive point of view, I were to ignore the original contribution it makes to an understanding of how civilization progresses or regresses on both positive and negative terms in an alternation, stemming from primal action, between reaction and attraction which takes it through successive stages of devolutionary or evolutionary development on both liberal and totalitarian terms towards the possibility of a culmination which, antithetical to how it began, will signify a sort of omega freedom that contrasts with the alpha freedom as the most positive psychic reaction with the most positive somatic action, having passed through several intermediate phases of reaction and attraction in soma and psyche which both confirm and advance a dualistic alternation between pluralistic and monistic systems.

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Opus 116

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i>THE DIALECTICS OF SYNTHETIC ATTRACTION: As suggested by the title, this work carries on my investigation of the dialectical process in terms of successive stages of civilization from alpha to omega, and does so in considerably more detail than THE CLASSLESS SOLUTION, not only correcting but expanding certain of the theories put forward at the tail-end of the above-mentioned work, with a consequence that what was virtually embryonic there has come to something approaching full maturity here, even down to the way in which the outcome of the historical process is envisaged.  For this work leaves nothing, so far as that is concerned, to be desired, and I can confidently say that I have achieved here the summation of my life's work, bringing to a very confident conclusion matters that were first broached several years, if not decades, ago, but with nothing of the logical clarity and sophistication which has since ensued.  It is even good to be reminded that one's texts are cyclical in character, spiralling up towards an ever-more comprehensively exacting summit which brings to a centro-complexifying head things that, in the very nature of such matters, it was only possible to introduce in more general terms earlier on or, rather, lower down the work's inner structure.  In that respect, what I have achieved here with regard to the interaction and interrelativity of psychological and physiological factors on either a female or a male basis, depending on the elemental context, surpasses, by far, whatever had been achieved before, and not only, I wager, by myself.  For this final working out of such psychological/physiological dualities puts everything in perspective, and it only remains for those who are capable of reading and appreciating my work - in all probability a tiny minority - to confirm me in the correctness of my vision and the accuracy of my truth, a truth which should endure for ever.

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Opus 117

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i>THE DIALECTICS OF CIVILIZATION: This work proves like no other that the use of certain colloquial expressions can, if revaluated on a sufficiently comprehensive basis, with one or two original additions thrown-in for good measure, lead to startling insights and enable one to deepen and/or broaden one's philosophy in such fashion that it ends-up doing greater justice to the truth (in both specific and comparative terms) than had been the case hitherto.  Thus with this title I have carried what was achieved in the preceding title, THE DIALECTICS OF GENDER AND CLASS, to a new and, I would suppose, altogether more definitively comprehensive level, a level which plots the development of civilization, in the broadest sense, from its alpha-most inception to its projected omega-most consummation, and does so with respect to both linear and axial perspectives which combine to permit of yet another fresh perspective which takes my theorizing to an all-time peak of dialectical insight, a worthy culmination to my philosophical quest!  For in this text I have achieved a well-nigh definitive insight into the distinctions between Space and Time which should leave one in no doubt as to the path that leads to Eternity and thus to a definitive resolution of life, the culmination not only of all civilization but, in a deeper sense, of that which transcends civilization in truly post-historical terms.

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Opus 118

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i>THE DIALECTICS OF GENDER AND CLASS: As the logical successor to the above, this text delves more profoundly into the distinctions between 'historical' and 'post-historical' civilizations, not least in respect of the shift from a genuine phenomenal and pseudo-noumenal status in the one to a pseudo-phenomenal and genuine noumenal status in the other proportionate to the degree of post-historicity actually obtaining.  With that in mind, we also find, in this work, a more definite sense of the relationships between gender and class, as well as the extent to which the seemingly complementary co-existence of the genders on a given class basis requires a hegemonic/subordinate dichotomy between them which, however it pans out, enables such a co-existence to prevail in the first place, quite apart from the modification of relations which results from the interactivity of antithetically complementary classes when once axial polarities have been established, with their gender paradoxes, as also described in one or two previous texts but with less methodical exactitude than here and certainly less overall certainty as to the specific class status of a given elemental position, be it phenomenal or noumenal.  For the linking of class with element and/or of anti-element with anticlass is now brought to a conclusive resolution which reaffirms the standing of gender in relation to each, making the relationship between gender and class complementary to an elemental persuasion, whether in sensuality or sensibility, that is the basis from which all gender and class distinctions spring.  Yet my philosophy would not be true to its genius if it did not also, and categorically, affirm an ideological bias in respect of a specific elemental and anti-elemental persuasion, thereby bringing to the plethora of options and findings a destiny which, for the seeker after ultimate truth, would leave him in no doubt as to the correct solution to the problem of choice and reality of options - a solution which can have only one outcome, and that of divine devising.

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Opus 119

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i>YANG AND ANTI-YIN: After a brief flirtation with numerology and a kind of oblique debunking of the esoteric or occult significance of triple-digit figures, this text quickly sets about its main task, which was to explore in more detail the dialectics of Yang and Anti-Yin, as already intimated at in previous texts, and bring to a conclusion matters which, in respect of noumenal sensibility, had been pending a more definitive resolution such that, as often in my work, could not but spill over into a more general resolution of other factors that had still not reached that definitive comprehensiveness which has been my goal all along and which, once reached, would confirm and enhance the truth of what most specifically pertains to the Truth as an exemplification of godly resolve.  But for every advance in the development and, ultimately, achievement of such a definitive working-out of all the parts in all the right places, there must come a corresponding advance to one's commitment of what most constitutes Truth and a willingness to illustrate or exemplify it in terms of an appropriate textural presentation, one that cannot be merely phenomenal and 'human all too human', but must first acknowledge and then scale and finally conquer the heights of a presentation of Truth that is incontestably godly and thus the only apt vehicle for what would traditionally have been called 'the Word of God' but which I, fearing worshipful devotion, shall simply call 'godly word' and leave for others to approach according to their abilities or capacities for the noumenally sensible heights, whether on a metaphysical or, indeed, an antimetachemical basis, as explained, together with so much more, in this definitive presentation of my philosophy which summarizes and brings to a conclusive resolution what in previous texts had still been in a formative stage of logical development and by no means as categorical a statement of Truth, together with what is less than and contrary to Truth, as is to be found on the pages of Yang and Anti-Yin, the End and Anti-Beginning of all philosophizing.

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Opus 120

 

i>LAMB AND ANTI-LION: Taking its thematic structure from the previous text, this work delves deeper into noumenal sensibility and its full gender and ideological implications, taking the biblical metaphors of ‘lamb’ and ‘lion’ to their ultimate conclusions in what becomes an exact parallel to the ‘yang’ and ‘anti-yin’ of our metaphysical and antimetachemical elemental positions.  But these elements are also investigated in greater detail, and provide ample scope for the enhancement or clarification of certain terms, including those with other elemental affinities than that with which we are chiefly concerned here.  Thus a broadening out from the central and core position of my philosophy is once again to the fore, and other positions are accordingly revaluated and modified in the light of my principal contentions.  Also modified, in this respect, are theories concerning life-after-death, which are now shown in a new light, not least in relation to my philosophy of history and the subdivisions which accrue to each of the three principal stages of civilization.  I think this is one of the factors which, in this text, has made it possible for me to be tougher on the Catholic Church than ever before and to demonstrate, logically and rationally, that the destiny of globalization can only be independent of both Western and Eastern traditions, since the full-flowering of noumenal sensibility is beyond the scope of any tradition rooted in its noumenal antithesis, no matter how obliquely.

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Opus 121

 

i>CELESTIAL CITY AND ANTI-VANITY FAIR: Like its two textural predecessors, this text takes what I had been building towards in the previous works to its ultimate logical conclusion and establishes, categorically and without equivocation, a definitive presentation of my work such that reaffirms the gender distinctions that exist at all points of what I am rather metaphorically wont to call our ‘axial compass’, and underlines the importance of taking such distinctions to their logical conclusions in the interests of philosophical certitude and, where noumenal sensibility is concerned, enhanced credibility in respect of godly truth.  For anything short of this logical distinction between the various gender positions, not least in relation to metaphysics and antimetachemistry, will betray Truth and render it difficult if not impossible to realize.  I hope others will agree with me, when they come to read this text, that it is the crowning achievement of my philosophy and the product of one who is in no doubt as to what Truth is and of just how difficult it will be, even with the best of ideological wills, to grant it its proper place in the edifice of religious progress and, what’s more, keep it there at the expense of everything else, not least that which appertains, in one way or another, to beauty.  Difficult, yes, but not impossible!  For this is the summation of reason, which is mind utilized in the interests of a beingfulness so supreme as to be heavenly and nothing short of the resolution of godly intent.

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Opus 122

 

i>JESUS - A SUMMING UP! (of supreme theosophical genius): As suggested by the title (which happens to be a pun on Arthur Koestler’s ‘Janus - A Summing Up’), this is my final text and one that brings my philosophizing-cum-theosophizing, if not philologizing-cum-theologizing, to a cumulative head as I restate some of the conclusive Social Theocratic theories of my previous work and modify, expand, and refine upon various of the more characteristic theories of the recent past.  Also, not altogether usual for me, I have allowed these theories to be invaded by a degree of autobiography which I needed to get out of my system and which, in any case, provided a springboard, as it were, to an enhanced approach to my more regular approach to writing and thinking. As also noted in this text, much of the writing is more blog-like than has usually been the case, and that doubtless owes something to the fact that I now blog on the Internet and regard blogging as the electronic successor to my e-books or, rather, e-scrolls, since I prefer HTML files to, say, Adobe-type files if only because there is a scroll-like continuity involved which takes text to an altogether different place on the axial compass, so to speak, from where it would otherwise be, and one, I am sure, which does more justice to universality in relation to global civilization than must any electronic extrapolation from books which, to my mind, are simply more Western in character.  However that may be, blogging is gradually taking over from book and/or scroll writing in my literary predilections, and therefore it is fitting if my conclusive text happens to be more blog-like than book-like.  Also, now that I have so many web sites, I find it laborious to the point of exasperating to add a new short text to each directory, especially since this requires an updating if not  replacement of any lists and synopses which may already be there in order to incorporate the new work.  Frankly, even my synopses are now something of a major work in their own right!  But, that said, I am first and foremost a writer of literary texts and have progressed, over the years, from philology to theology and philosophy to theosophy, sacrificing knowledge to truth and pleasure to joy.  My work is its own vindication, and anyone with enough intelligence who reads it will sooner or later come to the conclusion that it both adds up and provides a basis or blueprint for what has been colloquially described as ‘Kingdom Come’, a radically progressive alternative to either regressive or sensually-based structures of society that should lead, among other things, to the salvation of the world, as defined in this and other texts, and to eternal peace (for males) in the transcendent Beyond which it has been the privilege of this self-styled theologist (the suffix is intentional) and theosophist to delineate for the benefit of those who come after me and may well inherit, if all goes according to plan, the ‘Kingdom of God’ in question, such a ‘Kingdom’ being  anything but a kingdom in the usual sense but, in actuality, the theocratic antithesis to anything autocratic.

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Opus 123

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i>OPUS POSTSCRIPTUM1: This is simply bonus material dating from the autumn of 2005 and extending into July 2006 that was drafted in standard word processor and subsequently copied to one of my blog sites for enlargement or revision.  Less aphoristic in character, as befitting my general approach to weblogs, it is nevertheless highly philosophical in its treatment of a variety of subjects common to the oeuvre-proper and should stand as icing on the cake, so to speak, of my journeys to the centre of truth.

 

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Opus 124

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i>OPUS POSTSCRIPTUM2: No sooner had I finished the above than I began working on what was to become a second volume of aphoristically supernotational writings which, reversing the transcription process began above, takes my philosophy a step or two further towards what would now seem to be a definitive position in which everything is known about everything and nothing remains to be added to the oeuvre, not even on a supplementary basis such that I am happy to consider a fitting postscript.  Incidentally, the ‘icing on the cake’ alluded to in the previous synopsis is also a fair metaphor for what transpires here, albeit the cake … of my oeuvre in general … is decidedly round and therefore anything but square, still less rectangular or elliptical in shape.  It not only deals in metaphysics but brings metaphysics and an understanding of correlative factors to an all-time peak such that should confirm my pre-eminent status as one of the greatest thinkers of all time and certainly as the foremost thinker of my own age.

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Opus 125

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i>PHILOSOPHICAL RUMINATIONS: Originally drawn from a variety of lesser blog sites and subsequently enhanced at a new one, these aphoristic essays complement the above volumes and could almost be regarded as constituting Vol.3.  However, I decided to keep it separate in view of its final derivation being from a different blog site than the two volumes of 'Opus Postscriptum', and some of the material may already have been broached.  Much of it, however, is fresh, and it achieves an intensification of the definitiveness to which my works have laid claim for some considerable period of time now.  In fact, it would be difficult to conceive of anything ever being more definitive as far as the holding together of disparate material drawn from all points of the intercardinal axial compass is concerned.  Everything has its place, and can be known and judged accordingly.

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Opus 126

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i>THEOSOPHICAL ILLUMINATIONS: With this volume of ‘aphoristic essays’ derived, like the two volumes of 'Opus Postscriptum', from my blog site at spweblog.com, I have returned to a more systematic approach to philosophizing which definitely advances the ideological philosophy of Social Transcendentalism and/or Social Theocracy a rung or two further up the ladder of metaphysical ascent, not least in respect of its sense of being theosophically superior to anything purely or merely philosophical (not that the majority of works in ‘Journeys to the Centre of Truth’’ ever were!).

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Opus 127

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i>BEYOND TRUTH AND ILLUSION: Also derived from the above blogsite, where they were originally volume two of ‘aphoristic essays’, this volume of metaphysical philosophy, or theosophy-proper, brings my quest for metaphysical perfection to a close, as it enlarges on and/or corrects some of the material contained in the above title, as well as adds some fresh ideas and new perspectives, deriving from our by-now standard  intercardinal axial template, to what has already been achieved.  The title is largely self-explanatory but is also intended to stand as a contrast to my first-ever volume of philosophy, BETWEEN TRUTH AND ILLUSION; Nevertheless that particular volume of philosophical writings, which in contrast to the material here could be described as being largely comprised of aphoristic essays, was to set the stage for everything that has followed, and I can safely claim to have finally reached my life’s goal with BEYOND TRUTH AND ILLUSION and to have climbed to the top rung of my ladder of philosophical-theosophical Social Theocratic ascent, the final journey to the centre of truth.

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Opus 128

 

i>LITERATURE AND THE INTERCARDINAL AXIAL COMPASS: This is yet a further collection of revised and reformatted weblogs taken from a variety of sites where I had written material of a philosophical nature that actually post-dates, by several months, the previous collection listed above.  Therefore one would have to regard this as containing material which in most instances either goes beyond what was achieved before or adds new subjects or, at any rate, a fresh or revised approach to a variety of subjects which may not have been dealt with in quiet such a systematic or well-nigh definitive manner previously.  Another thing that most definitely distinguishes this project from the above is that I was far more methodically aphoristic in my approach to the reformatting of material that, in weblog form, was virtually essayistic and therefore unworthy, as far as I am concerned, of a properly metaphysical connotation – something, incidentally, that also applies to the italic-writerly presentation of ‘the word’ which, as here, leaves the printerly norms of weblogging far behind and thus stands as a further justification for my having reformatted previously published material in a way that would be commensurate with the best of my writings and with all that I, as a self-taught metaphysical philosopher, morally and intellectually stand for.

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Opus 129

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i>THE BEST OF ALL POSSIBLE WORLDS: Unlike the above title and several of those preceding it, this is not a revised and reformatted compilation of philosophical weblogs but, on the contrary, an actual e-book written into a notebook and then transcribed to computer, so that it is the first – and probably last – of its kind since at least JESUS - A SUMMING UP, and does more summing up, as well as extending and completing, my philosophy than even the aforementioned text, with its allusion to Koestler’s book of a similar name.  In this case, the ‘best of all possible worlds’ is decidedly metaphysical and pseudo-metachemical and therefore germane to what I would call ‘Kingdom Come’, even if an appreciation of this requires an understanding of everything else, whether contrary to or beneath it, in order that one may be left in no doubt about the desirability, from a metaphysical standpoint, of such a perfect world.  We have dreamed of it for centuries, if not millennia, but it is only now that the possibility of actually turning the dream into reality can be seriously undertaken in the sure knowledge of what is required and of why its requirement is so important, both morally and socially.  With THE BEST OF ALL POSSIBLE WORLDS I can confidently say that I have reached the culmination point of my oeuvre and achieved my philosophical goal in what is arguably the best of all (my) possible texts!

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Opus 130

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i>THE QUEST FOR TRUTH: Subtitled 'And the Meaning of Life', this project derives from a series of weblogs I originally published at Helium.com under the alias 'johalin', and subsequently revised and reformatted in the interests of both escroll (as here) and ebook publication, the latter of course signifying a 'printerly' descent from an 'italic-writerly' metaphysical norm. That said, this collection of revised weblogs both ante-dates and post-dates material contained in the above title, 'The Best of All Possible Worlds', since some of it was written earlier in 2008, although the majority of its contents, or effective aphorisms, were actually written in 2009, with material that seems to extend beyond previous texts or simply, as so often in the past, to correct or modify existing material, sometimes filling in one or two blanks. All the titles of this project were taken from available options at Helium.com, but I think I am probably unique in saying that I would approach them from what I had already written locally, on my PC, and simply uploaded to the blog host once I had found what appeared to be a suitable title. None of the titles, however, are what I would have chosen myself, which is one of the ways in which this project differs from all of my earlier compilations of revised and reformatted weblogs. Yet these aphorisms were also 'farmed out' to other blog sites, where I was free to choose a title, and usually the results were more reflective of the contents - never particularly easy to peg down to one heading - than is arguably the case here, with this final such collection. Nevertheless, the contents are, for the most part, philososphically cogent and incontrovertibly true, which is to say, logically sustainable. Everything finally adds up, as it should do if one is to rest assured of one's reputation, no matter how self-appointed, as 'philosopher king'.

 

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Opus 131

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i>THE CENTRE OF TRUTH: If anything sounds like a definitive title it is this one, which is the last in a series of reformatted and revised weblogs, in this case of material hosted by Anoox.com under the alias yaholin, and now available in both escroll and ebook formats for the sake of enhanced appreciation. Certainly I have managed to wrap up my philosophy in this 2009 package, and anyone who really desires enlightenment on the subjects of God, Heaven, Truth, etc., should have no difficulty in finding confirmation here of my long and difficult journey to Truth or, more to the point, the 'Centre of Truth', which is its vindication and ultimate resolution.

 

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Opus 132

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i>MY SOUL ON ICE: This project combines autobiographical with philosophical material in such a way as to harmonize with my customary approach to anything remotely resembling an autobiography which, as on previous occasions, could not materialize were it not for my ongoing or, in this instance, definitive commitment to philosophy, which has always been my raison d’être for writing and therefore justification for anything else, including autobiography.  In this, the third such project, the combination of the two approaches to literature is brought to a veritable apotheosis, and it would be no surprise if this paradoxically turned out to be my last literary hurrah – a fitting climax to a brilliant vocation.

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Opus 133

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i>BOLD AND ECLECTIC: This project also combines autobiographical with philosophical material in such a way as to harmonize with my customary approach to anything remotely resembling an autobiography which, as on previous occasions (see above), couldn't have materialized were it not for my ongoing or, in this instance, well-nigh definitive commitment to philosophy, which has always been my raison d’être for writing in the first place and therefore justification for everything else, including autobiography, so that I am, in many respects, the opposite of, say, Henry Miller, the great American autobiographical writer and sometime philosopher.  In this, the fourth of such projects, the combination of the twin approaches to literature is brought to a veritable climax, and it would be no surprise to me if this work transpired to being my last literary venture – a fitting climax to a literary vocation without precedent and unlikely to be superseded.

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Opus 134

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i>INSANE BUT NOT MAD: All the titles in this collection of revised and reformatted weblogs were originally hosted by a number of blog sites, including, most especially, Wordpress.com, and date from 2011. As usual I have been careful to ensure that the original chronology of weblogs has been, so far as possible, replicated, so that one can proceed through the material with a growing sense of continuity and even thematic enhancement, two crucial advantages of e-scroll or e-book publication over what may often appear to be the disjunctive if not chronologically unrelated nature of blogging. Even so, I have usually tended to approach weblogs from a standpoint centred in my metaphysically-oriented philosophy of Social Transcendentalism and intended, as far as possible, to achieve some kind of thematic continuity in spite of the formal limitations of blogging, and I believe that, here as in previous such compilations, I have largely succeeded in producing a body of work that not only adds up but also seems quite inter-related and even cohesive, partly, I suspect, because few of my weblogs were ever written in situ but usually derive from prior notes which I was then able to copy-in and upgrade or 'beef up', preparatory to downloading them to a local file which would subsequently serve as the basis, following revision, for a new e-scroll and/or e-book. Hopefully, this one is as good as if not better than each of the previous such texts, and it should go some way to putting the finishing touches to my overall philosophy and prove, moreover, that a man who claims to be insane is not necessarily also mad.

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Opus 135

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i>MUSINGS OF A SUPERFLUOUS MAN: All the pieces in this collection of revised and reformatted weblogs were originally hosted by Wordpress.com, and date from 2011. As usual, I have been careful to ensure that the original chronology of weblogs has been, so far as possible, replicated, so that one can proceed through the material with a growing sense of continuity and even thematic enhancement, two crucial advantages of e-scroll or e-book publication over what may often appear to be the disjunctive if not chronologically unrelated nature of blogging. Even so, I have usually tended to approach weblogs from a standpoint centred in my metaphysically-oriented philosophy of Social Transcendentalism and intended, as far as possible, to achieve some kind of thematic continuity in spite of the formal limitations of blogging, and I believe that, here as in previous such compilations, I have largely succeeded in producing a body of work that not only adds up, but also seems quite inter-related and even cohesive, partly, I suspect, because few of my weblogs were ever written in situ but, like previous such texts, usually derive from prior notes which I was then able to copy-in and upgrade or 'beef up', preparatory to downloading them to a local file which would subsequently serve as the basis, following revision, for a new e-scroll and/or e-book. Hopefully, this one is as good as if not better than each of the previous ones, including its immediate forerunner above, and it should put the finishing touches to my overall philosophy and prove, moreover, that a man who sees himself as being superfluous in and/or to one kind of society may well prove virtually indispensable to another and different kind of society which is, as yet, only latent in certain sections of the people.

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Opus 136

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i>FROM SUPERFLUOUS MAN TO SUPERMAN: All the pieces in this third collection of revised and reformatted weblogs originally hosted by Wordpress.com also date from 2011, which would seem to be a pretty productive year. As before, I have been careful to ensure that the original chronology of weblogs has been replicated, so that one can proceed through the material with a growing sense of continuity and even thematic enhancement, two crucial advantages of e-scroll or e-book publication over what may often appear to be the disjunctive if not chronologically unrelated nature of blogging. Even so, I have usually tended to approach weblogs from a standpoint centred in my metaphysically-oriented philosophy of Social Transcendentalism and intended, as far as possible, to achieve some kind of thematic continuity in spite of the formal limitations of blogging, and I believe that, here as in previous such compilations, I have largely succeeded in producing a body of work that not only adds up, but also seems quite inter-related and even cohesive, partly, I suspect, because few of my weblogs were ever written in situ but, like previous such texts, usually derive from prior notes which I was then able to copy-in and upgrade or 'beef up', preparatory to downloading them to a local file which would subsequently serve as the basis, following revision, for a new e-scroll and/or e-book. Hopefully, this one is as good as if not better than each of the previous ones, including its immediate precursor above, and may serve to prove, moreover, that a man who sees himself as being superfluous in and/or to one kind of society could well prove of superhuman and, more particularly, supermasculine significance to himself which the type of society he lives in would be unable to comprehend, much less appreciate. In this latest and hopefully final text I have achieved something akin to a personal or, rather, universal resurrection which leaves the 'superfluous man' trailing far behind in the depths of worldly despondency, as I scale new heights of metaphysical certitude that resolve the long struggle, or 'journey', towards Truth which was the original motive for everything I have since written.

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Opus 137

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i>AHEAD IN THE CLOUDS: All the pieces in this fourth collection of revised and reformatted weblogs originally hosted by Wordpress.com date from 2012, and are therefore bang up-to-date. As before, I have been careful to ensure that the original chronology of weblogs has been replicated, so that one can proceed through the material with a growing sense of continuity and even thematic enhancement, two crucial advantages of e-scroll and/or e-book publication over what may often appear to be the disjunctive if not chronologically unrelated nature of blogging. Even so, I have usually tended to approach weblogs from a standpoint centred in my metaphysically-oriented philosophy of Social Theocracy (Social Transcendentalism) and intended, as far as possible, to achieve some kind of thematic continuity in spite of the formal limitations of blogging, and I believe that, here as in previous such compilations, I have largely succeeded in producing a body of work that not only adds up, but also seems quite inter-related and even cohesive, partly, I suspect, because few if any of my weblogs were ever written in situ but, like previous such texts, usually derive from prior notes which I was then able to copy-in and upgrade or 'beef up', preparatory to downloading them to a local file which would subsequently serve as the basis, following revision, for a new e-scroll and/or e-book, as the case may be. Hopefully, this one is as good as if not better than any of the previous ones, including its immediate precursor 'From Superfluous Man to Superman', and one may gauage from its title that, in this instance, the 'Superman' is someone who regards himself as being in the metaphysical vanguard of life even when, contrary to his usual predilection for abstract thought, he has his head not only in the proverbial clouds but in the actual clouds, so to speak, of what more naturally passes for metaphysics in the sky and may well be loosely akin to the idealism of zeppelin-type airships.

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Opus 138

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i>PHILOSOPHIC FLIGHTS OF POETIC FANCY: All the pieces in this fifth collection of revised and reformatted weblogs originally hosted by Wordpress.com date, like the above, from 2012, and are therefore bang up-to-date. As before, I have been careful to ensure that the original chronology of weblogs has been replicated, so that one can proceed through the material with a growing sense of continuity and even thematic enhancement, two crucial advantages of e-scroll and/or e-book publication over what may often appear to be the disjunctive if not chronologically unrelated nature of blogging. Even so, I have usually tended to approach weblogs from a standpoint centred in my metaphysically-oriented philosophy of Social Theocracy (Social Transcendentalism) and intended, as far as possible, to achieve some kind of thematic continuity in spite of the formal limitations of blogging, and I believe that, here as in previous such compilations, I have largely succeeded in producing a body of work that not only adds up, but also seems quite inter-related and even cohesive, partly, I suspect, because few if any of my weblogs were ever written in situ but, like previous such texts, usually derive from prior notes which I was then able to copy-in and upgrade or 'beef up', preparatory to downloading them to a local file which would subsequently serve as the basis, following revision, for a new e-scroll and/or e-book, as the case may be. Hopefully, this eScroll is as good as if not better than any of the previous ones, including its immediate precursor 'Ahead in the Clouds', and one may gauage from its title that, in this instance, the 'philosophic flights' would not have been possible without a certain degree of 'poetic fancy' which acted as a springboard to those thoughts which derive more from logical reflection than from natural contemplation, whether or not the latter were infused with speculative flights of metaphysical supposition.

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Opus 139

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i>LIMITLESS: In this, the third of three books written in 2012, I have abandoned weblogs in favour of a return to a more formal, premeditated approach to composition which, not for the first time in my literary career, combines autobiography with philosophy within the context of a journal, only this time one without limits and therefore effectively limitless. I have described this journal as intermittent, since there are small gaps in the chronology of days, but that enabled me to create a chapter-like parallel in relation to those days which were consecutive or in the same month, thereby cutting down on the overall number of chapters or, more correctly, chapter equivalents. As the reader will discover, this book is also - and even primarily - a travel journal, though only within the confines of certain parts of Galway in the Republic of Ireland, which I visited again not so long ago. When, finally, I came to choosing a title, I had my first literary journal FIXED LIMITS (1976) in mind, but of course my whole approach to writing is now so different that I felt the need for an antithetical type of title was necessary and, indeed, justified by much of the content in this particular journal, which is much less fictional, overall, than the first one. As for the title, I naively assumed that it would be quite original, not knowing, at the time, that there was also a film by that name which, I am bound to say, would have little or nothing in common with this work.

 

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Opus 140

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i>RELUCTANCE: This autobiographical-cum-philosophical journal is effectively the sequel to LIMITLESS (2012), since it continues from where the previous such project leaves off, being in many respects its logical corollary. Not only is the autobiography taken beyond the situation that existed towards the close of 2012, but so, too, in a number of ways is the philosophy, so that one gets a fuller perspective on both the subjective and objective, the personal and vocational aspects of the writer's life that both complements and resolves the subject matter of its prequel, taking it to a new level in a similar, albeit stylistically different, vein to the way that FIXED LIMITS (1976) went beyond CHANGING WORLDS (1976) and somehow resolved many of its outstanding issues, since effectively existing within the context of a 'changed world' from that in which its principal character, Michael Savage, who was of course modelled on myself, had previously lived. So, too, in RELUCTANCE do I find myself existing in a different social situation and even mileu from that in which LIMITLESS was written, though whether or not it marks an improvement, given the justifications adduced for my reluctance to write, is a debatable point, and one which the reader will have to decide for himself, much as one would like to think that, even with all the grounds adduced in the text for being reluctant, I have rarely written anything eschatologically and ontologically better or more credibly profound within the general framework of my ideological philosophy of Social Theocracy.

 

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Opus 141

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i>RESERVATIONS IN ORANGE AND GREEN: The only reason there is an orange notebook 3 and not a green notebook 3 in this literary project having markedly philosophical overtones is that the first orange notebook was already over two-thirds full with previous literary material when I began to use it for this project, and that, since I wanted a balance, as far as possible, between the green and orange notebooks, both in terms of length and amount and quality of material contained within each of them, I opted to fill about two-thirds of a third orange notebook in my possession in order to compensate for the comparative brevity of the first notebook, thereby presenting the reader with approximately as much orange notebook material overall as green notebook material, but without any intention of suggesting a bias towards the orange at the expense of the green simply on account of the partially-filled additional orange notebook. The results, overall, are pretty interchangeable, in any case, since I did not consciously attempt to think or write, from an Irish standpoint, in a more 'green' way with the green notebooks or in a more 'orange' way with the orange ones, even if sometimes a bias towards one or the other tendency could be inferred. What I wanted, and I believe achieved, was a framework that allowed me to think and write freely without undue concessions to either colour (or ethnicity), and somehow I succeeded, even at this late stage in my literary vocation, in both correcting a fairly long-standing philosophic error of logic (which need not be addressed here, since it will become fairly self-evident later on) and extending my philosophy to embrace an entirely new perspective which I believe to be of seminal importance in both understanding and defining contemporary civilization as an extension of Western civilization, whether or not one relates to it or has any ancestral connections with it. And I have achieved all this within a relatively short project, one which transcends the conventional printerly book bias towards volume, not to say mass, in the interests of aphoristic brevity and metaphysical credibility within a literary framework more suited, I believe, to eBook publication on the Internet, not to say to philosophical truth, even with other considerations, often of a quite literary and even entertaining nature, that had to be considered along the largely time/pseudo-space way in which the subject of 'reservations', amounting to the thematic leitmotif of this project, was duly investigated from a number of angles in both the orange and green notebooks, with a view to enhancing my understanding of what it means to be 'reserved'.

 

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Opus 142

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i>CHRISTMAS IN THE DOGHOUSE: The title of this 142nd Opus in my oeuvre references both Christmas and, less obviously, the American informal expression of being in disfavour, so has nothing to do with kennels or dogs. Then, too, this title is more applicable to only one of the chapters or numbered sections in this project, namely the last one which, in contrast to all of the others, is a kind of excursion, rare for me these days, into short prose or, if you prefer, into the fictional realm of short stories, albeit on terms that derive from an actual situation that occurred several decades ago when I was still a boy in care and had not yet begun to make my own way in the world. So, with that said, I can honestly state that this project, like most of the preceding ones, is mostly aphoristic philosophy, albeit of a sort that I would hope was unique to me and to my approach to literature of a philosophical nature. Those looking for either an extension of or a modification to certain logical or thematic aspects of my overall philosophy (of Social Theocracy and/or Transcendentalism) will not be disappointed. Nor will anyone who, mindful of poetic tendencies characterizing a few of my previous works, doesn't mind the occasional departure from philosophical logic into fantasy or something approximating poetic licence. And for those who like a little autobiography, whether personal or circumstantial, well, there is that, too. So, all in all, this work should not disappoint but, rather, serve to enhance my reputation as a philosophical artist par excellence.

 

 

Opus 143

 

i>THE FOURFOLD COMPOSITION OF ELEMENTS AND PSEUDO-ELEMENTS IN AXIAL PERSPECTIVE: Even by my own structurally exacting standards this is an exceptionally demanding work, the logical comprehensiveness of which matches if not surpasses the best of what I have done in the past, with the benefit of a number of theoretical modifications brought to bear on the overall Element-derived frameworks which, as suggested by the title, encompass both subatomic elements as hegemonic factors and pseudo-subatomic pseudo-elements as subordinate factors in any given pairing, or complementarity, that may be presumed to exist in axial polarity with either a noumenalor a phenomenal, an ethereal or a corporeal, counterpart within both church-hegemonic and state-hegemonic parameters. But the conclusions arrived at in this work are only the end-product, as it were, of much formative and speculative material which led to them, and it was during the earlier phases of its construction that, not altogether surprisingly, the writing was most discursive and, frankly, open to a variety of literary avenues, including material of an autobiographical and poetical nature that helped to give the text a certain literary openness which should prove as intriguing to the general reader as to those whose orientation is philosophical but who like their philosophy to be supplemented in such eclectic fashion, as much to preclude pretentious academicism or undue tedium as to refresh the mind and keep one wondering what is coming next. Therefore one shouldn’t be afraid of the title, because there is much here that would have absolutely nothing to do with it, and what does is logically credible enough to stand at or near the apex of my philosophical adventure.

 

 

Opus 144

 

i>ATOMS AND PSEUDO-ATOMS: Even by my own structurally-exacting standards as exemplified, not least, by the previous title THE FOURFOLD COMPOSITION OF ELEMENTS AND PSEUDO-ELEMENTS IN AXIAL PERSPECTIVE, this is an exceptionally-demanding work, the logical comprehensiveness of which actually surpasses, on a more radical basis, the best of what I have done in the past, with the benefit of a number of theoretical modifications brought to bear on the overall Element-derived fourfold frameworks which, as suggested by the title, encompass both atoms as hegemonic factors and pseudo-atoms as subordinate factors in any given pairing, or 'complementarity', which may be presumed to exist in axial polarity with either a noumenal or a phenomenal, an ethereal or a corporeal, counterpart within both church-hegemonic and state-hegemonic parameters. Frankly, the contents of this work would not have been possible without the preceding one. For this is undoubtedly the more evolved of the two, drawing conclusions which were only implicit before, in the earlier title, but which here bring my metaphysical thinking, as it were, into what must be a definitive presentation such that really does signify the metaphysical apex of my long philosophical journey that began way back in the early 1970s with my first tentative forays into literary composition. – John O’Loughlin.

 

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Copyright © 1974-2014 John O'Loughlin

 

 

 

 


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