SELF VIS--VIS NOT-SELF

 

71. The self, as we have seen, is that which is conscious, whether instinctually, emotionally, intellectually, or spiritually, and is thus that which exists in relation to the not-self of organic will.

 

72. But the self can become both more than and less than itself through utilization of the not-self for purposes of identifying, as far as possible, with that which selflessly emanates from the not-self as organic spirit.

 

73. Thus the self is transported, via the not-self, to superself, from which spiritual extension of itself in relation to selflessness it is obliged to rebound to the opposite extreme ... of subself, wherein the achievement of a profounder experience of itself is made possible, before a return to the middle-ground, so to speak, of ordinary self occurs, as a psychological necessity.

 

74. Thus the self is stretched first in one direction, that of superconscious selflessness, and then in a contrary direction, that of subconscious selfhood, before returning to its egocentric norm, wherein the process of escaping from self in order to achieve a deeper experience of self begins afresh.

 

75. But this could not happen without the assistance of both the not-self, whether metachemical, chemical, physical, or metaphysical, whose organic will enables the self to be transported, and selflessness, which is the spirit, whether metachemical, chemical, physical, or metaphysical, upon which it is transported.

 

76. Hence there is always a connection between the self, in whatever guise, and both the not-self and a correlative order of selfless spirit emanating from that not-self which the self can embrace only up to a certain point, the point of superconscious extremism, from which it must rebound to the subconscious extreme in due psychic course.

 

77. Now this distinction between self and transported self on the one hand, and not-self and selflessness on the other ... is between egocentric personality and psychocentric impersonality in the one case, and not-egocentric will and egoless spirit in the other case, which is also a distinction between form and content on the one hand, that of the self and transported self, and between power and glory on the other hand, that of the not-self and selflessness.

 

78. Thus the egocentric personality of the self is fated, through utilization of both the not-self and selflessness, to become psychocentrically impersonal in the superconscious extreme, before becoming psychocentrically personal in the subconscious extreme, from which it must return to egocentric consciousness as before, and so on.

 

79. Hence there is a progression, for the self, from form to content, as from egocentric personality to psychocentric impersonality, and then, unable to live with the superconscious extreme for long, a rebound to psychocentric personality occurs, as from content to contentment, in which the subconscious is experienced, prior to a return to egocentric consciousness.

 

80. The 'Three-in-One' of the self is thus a self of egocentric personality, a superself of psychocentric impersonality, and a subself of psychocentric personality, as form is superseded, thanks to selflessness, by content, and content is in turn superseded, thanks to selfishness, by contentment, the contentment which follows from a profounder experience of the self than would otherwise have been possible, and from which one must again return to egocentric selfhood in the process of re-establishing one's psychological equilibrium.

 

81. But just as the form of the egocentric self can be either metachemical, chemical, physical, or metaphysical in both sensuality and sensibility, so the contentment of the psychocentric self will be either metachemical, chemical, physical, or metaphysical, depending on the prevailing element in the relationship of self to not-self and of selflessness to superself/subself at any particular time.

 

82. Hence to contrast, within fiery metachemistry, the beautiful form of the metachemical egocentric self in relation to the metachemical not-self of the eyes in sensuality and the heart in sensibility ... with the loving contentment of the metachemical psychocentric self in relation to the metachemical selflessness of the light in sensuality and the blood in sensibility, whose content conditions the metachemical egocentric self towards psychocentric impersonality/personality.

 

83. Hence to contrast, within watery chemistry, the strong form of the chemical egocentric self in relation to the chemical not-self of the tongue in sensuality and the womb in sensibility ... with the proud contentment of the chemical psychocentric self in relation to the chemical selflessness of verbal salivation in sensuality and pregnancy in sensibility, whose content conditions the chemical egocentric self towards psychocentric impersonality/personality.

 

84. Hence to contrast, within vegetative physics, the knowledgeable form of the physical egocentric self in relation to the physical not-self of the phallus in sensuality and the brain in sensibility ... with the pleasurable contentment of the physical psychocentric self in relation to the physical selflessness of the orgasm in sensuality and (prayerful) thought in sensibility, whose content conditions the physical egocentric self towards psychocentric impersonality/personality.

 

85. Hence to contrast, within airy metaphysics, the truthful form of the metaphysical egocentric self in relation to the metaphysical not-self of the ears in sensuality and the lungs in sensibility ... with the joyful contentment of the metaphysical psychocentric self in relation to the metaphysical selflessness of the airwaves in sensuality and the breath in sensibility, whose content conditions the metaphysical egocentric self towards psychocentric impersonality/personality.

 

86. Of course one could and really should distinguish more pedantically between the personality of the phenomenal planes of volume and mass, and the universality of the noumenal planes of time and space, since that which is noumenal is less personal than universal, and therefore of a standing that obliges one to distinguish between universal orders of egocentric self and psychocentric self in relation to metachemical and metaphysical elements, and to contrast each of these with their impersonal equivalents in what may be described as psychocentric un-universality, and hence 'versality' or, more correctly, polyversality.

 

87. Be that as it may, I have persisted in using the terms 'personal' and 'impersonal' for convenience's sake, since such terms make generalizing easier and, besides, one can still distinguish the noumenal from the phenomenal on the basis of metachemical from chemical on the one hand, that of fire and water, and of metaphysical from physical on the other hand, that of air and vegetation.

 

88. Thus not only can the self be personal in one context and impersonal in another, where, by contrast, it becomes psychocentric, but it can be either personal on the phenomenal planes of volume and mass or universal on the noumenal planes of time and space, with due modifications of psychocentricity, as before.

 

89. But if the conscious self equals ego on any plane, in both external and internal, sensual and sensible contexts, then the superconscious self and/or subconscious self equals mind, or psyche, not the not-self or selflessness, but transported and transmuted self that becomes first psychocentrically impersonal and/or polyversal (depending on the plane) and then psychocentrically personal and/or universal, as it rebounds from superconscious mind to subconscious mind, before returning to egocentric selfhood afresh.

 

90. Hence just as ego can be metachemical, chemical, physical, or metaphysical, depending on the element, so mind, the psychic extrapolation from egocentric psychology, can be likewise, due to the influence, in no small part, of spirit, such that selflessly emanates from the will of the not-self on either metachemical, chemical, physical, or metaphysical terms, depending, once again, on the elemental context.

 

91. Thus we have to distinguish one type of psyche, or mind, from another not only in terms of superconscious impersonality and/or polyversality vis--vis subconscious personality and/or universality, but also in terms of each of the elements, so that there is no one overall psyche, but different kinds of psyche in relation to metachemistry, chemistry, physics, and metaphysics.

 

92. Hence there can be four kinds of psyche both in sensuality and sensibility, as well as their respective subdivisions, according to whether selflessness or enhanced selfhood is prevalent at any particular time.

 

93. Thus psyche can be both spiritual and emotional in all four elements, albeit in different ways according to whether fire, water, vegetation, or air is the prevailing element, while the ego will always be intellectual in one of four different ways, and the not-self or not-ego always wilful, or characterized by will, and hence power.

 

94. For will it is that powers the glory of spirit, whichever spirit that may happen to be, and spirit it is which adds content to egocentric form and makes it possible for content to psychocentrically achieve contentment for itself on the rebound from superconscious mind to subconscious mind, thereby acquiring a profounder experience of itself through emotional fulfilment.

 

95. But no sooner has mind acquired such a profounder experience than, duly universal and/or personal (depending on the plane), the ego re-asserts itself in the interests of psychological equilibrium and consciously plunges into the not-self again, so that the self may be transported anew towards selflessness by that which is selfless and from which it must react, in due superconscious course, in the interests not only of enhanced self-realization but, more fundamentally, of self-preservation.

 

96. For the self is not only what comes first, as form; it is also what comes last, as contentment, and both the powerful will of the not-self and the glorious spirit of selflessness are but means for it to a psychocentric end in spiritual content and, most especially, emotional contentment.

 

97. Just as there are four kinds of form and content(ment) in both sensuality and sensibility, so there are four kinds of power and glory in each context, which correspond to metachemical, chemical, physical, and metaphysical options.

 

98. We can grade these four kinds of power and glory from 1-4, starting with the first-rate power and glory of metachemistry which, in its noumenal objectivity, is expressive, and continuing with the second-rate power and glory of chemistry which, in its phenomenal objectivity, is compressive; continuing again with the third-rate power and glory of physics, which, in its phenomenal subjectivity, is depressive, and ending with the fourth-rate power and glory of metaphysics which, in its noumenal subjectivity, is impressive.

 

99. Hence power and glory descends from that which is most powerful and glorious in metachemical expression to that which is least powerful and glorious in metaphysical impression via that which is more (relative to most) powerful and glorious in chemical compression and that which is less (relative to least) powerful and glorious in physical depression.

 

100. Considering that power and glory descends from first- to fourth-rate, it seems to me logically correlative that form and content(ment) should ascend from fourth- to first-rate, since it is inconceivable that one could have a first-rate form and content(ment) in connection with a first-rate power and glory or, conversely, a fourth-rate form and content(ment) in connection with a fourth-rate power and glory.

 

101. That which, as power and glory, has its per se manifestation in expression would be too disruptive of form and content(ment) to allow for anything other than a fourth-rate manifestation of the latter, while, conversely, that which, as power and glory, was most 'bovaryized' through impression would be least disruptive of form and content(ment), and thus most inclined to allow for a first-rate, or per se, manifestation of the latter.

 

102. Hence if form and content(ment) ascend from that which is least formal and content through metachemical expression to that which is most formal and content through metaphysical impression via that which is less (relative to least) formal and content through chemical compression and that which is more (relative to most) formal and content through physical depression, we may categorically maintain that form and content(ment) will be fourth-rate in connection with the first-rate power and glory of metachemical expression, third-rate in connection with the second-rate power and glory of chemical compression, second-rate in connection with the third-rate power and glory of physical depression, and first-rate in connection with the fourth-rate power and glory of metaphysical impression.

 

103. Reversing this, one may contend that a first-rate power and glory will engender a fourth-rate form and content(ment), a second-rate power and glory engender a third-rate form and content(ment), a third-rate power and glory engender a second-rate form and content(ment), and a fourth-rate power and glory engender a first-rate form and content(ment).

 

104. Thus whereas power and glory are only in their per se manifestations in expression, they are 'once bovaryized' in compression, 'twice bovaryized' in depression, and 'thrice bovaryized' in impression. Conversely, whereas form and content(ment) are only in their per se manifestations in impression, they are 'once bovaryized' in depression, 'twice bovaryized' in compression, and 'thrice bovaryized' in expression.

 

105. Beauty is the fourth-rate, or expressive, form that exists in relation to the first-rate power of metachemical will (the eyes in sensuality and the heart in sensibility), while love is the fourth-rate content(ment) that exists in relation to the first-rate glory of metachemical spirit (sight-light in sensuality and the blood in sensibility).

 

106. Strength is the third-rate, or compressive, form that exists in relation to the second-rate power of chemical will (the tongue in sensuality and the womb in sensibility), while pride is the third-rate content(ment) that exists in relation to the second-rate glory of chemical spirit (verbal salivation in sensuality and amniotic fluid in sensibility).

 

107. Knowledge is the second-rate, or depressive, form that exists in relation to the third-rate power of physical will (the phallus in sensuality and the brain in sensibility), while pleasure is the second-rate content(ment) that exists in relation to the third-rate glory of physical spirit (sperm in sensuality and thought in sensibility).

 

108. Truth is the first-rate, or impressive, form that exists in relation to the fourth-rate power of metaphysical will (the ears in sensuality and the lungs in sensibility), while joy is the first-rate content(ment) that exists in relation to the fourth-rate glory of metaphysical spirit (the airwaves in sensuality and the breath in sensibility).

 

109. Hence the ascension of form and content(ment) from beauty and love to truth and joy via strength and pride and knowledge and pleasure ... is accompanied by the descension, so to speak, of power and glory from metachemical will and spirit (Devil and Hell) to metaphysical will and spirit (God and Heaven) via chemical will and spirit (woman and purgatory) and physical will and spirit (man and earth).

 

110. The metachemical self is a fourth-rate self that exists (in universal egocentric and polyversal/universal psychocentric manifestations) in relation both to a first-rate not-self (eyes and/or heart) and to first-rate selflessness (sight-light and/or blood), while the chemical self is a third-rate self that exists (in personal egocentric and impersonal/personal psychocentric manifestations) in relation both to a second-rate not-self (tongue and/or womb) and to second-rate selflessness (verbal salivation and/or amniotic fluid).

 

111. The physical self is a second-rate self that exists (in personal egocentric and impersonal/personal psychocentric manifestations) in relation both to a third-rate not-self (phallus and/or brain) and to third-rate selflessness (spermatic orgasm and/or prayerful thought), while the metaphysical self is a first-rate self that exists (in universal egocentric and polyversal/universal psychocentric manifestations) in relation both to a fourth-rate not-self (ears and/or lungs) and to fourth-rate selflessness (airwaves and/or the breath).

 

112. Where there is most power and glory, as in metachemical expression, there will be least form and content(ment), while, conversely, where there is most form and content(ment), as in metaphysical impression, there will be least power and glory.

 

113. Where there is more (relative to most) power and glory, as in chemical compression, there will be less (relative to least) form and content(ment), while, conversely, where there is more (relative to most) form and content(ment), as in physical depression, there will be less (relative to least) power and glory.

 

114. Just as expression is synonymous with doing, the appearance-based attribute of noumenal objectivity, so impression is synonymous with being, the essence-centred attribute of noumenal subjectivity.

 

115. Just as compression is synonymous with giving, the quantitative attribute of phenomenal objectivity, so depression is synonymous with taking, the qualitative attribute of phenomenal subjectivity.

 

116. Hence we may plot an overall progression from the doing of metachemical expression to the being of metaphysical impression via the giving of chemical compression and the taking of physical depression - as from fire to air via water and vegetation.

 

117. Whereas both doing and giving are devolutionary with regard to their respective orders (noumenal/phenomenal) of objectivity, both taking and being are evolutionary with regard to their respective orders (phenomenal/noumenal) of subjectivity.

 

118. To descend from the most doing of the metachemical will to the least doing of the metaphysical will via the more (relative to most) doing of the chemical will and the less (relative to least) doing of the physical will.

 

119. To descend from the most giving of the chemical spirit to the least giving of the physical spirit via the more (relative to most) giving of the metachemical spirit and the less (relative to least) giving of the metaphysical spirit.

 

120. To ascend from the least taking of the chemical ego to the most taking of the physical ego via the less (relative to least) taking of the metachemical ego and the more (relative to most) taking of the metaphysical ego.

 

121. To ascend from the least being of the metachemical soul to the most being of the metaphysical soul via the less (relative to least) being of the chemical soul and the more (relative to most) being of the physical soul.

 

122. The will is of course synonymous with the instinctual not-self, the spirit with emanational selflessness, the ego with the intellectual self, and the soul with the emotional self, or that which is subconscious as opposed to conscious or (in connection with the spirit) superconscious.

 

123. The will, or not-self, corresponds to power, and power can be evil, good, foolish, or wise, depending whether it has associations with metachemical expression (doing), chemical compression (giving), physical depression (taking), or metaphysical impression (being).

 

124. The spirit, or selflessness, corresponds to glory, and glory can be barbarous, civilized, natural, or cultural, depending whether it has associations with fire, water, vegetation, or air.

 

125. The ego, or conscious self, corresponds to form, and form can be criminal, punishing, sinful, or graceful, depending whether it has associations with beauty, strength, knowledge, or truth.

 

126. The soul, or subconscious self, corresponds to content(ment), and content(ment) can be cruel, clever, stupid, or kind, depending whether it has associations with love, pride, pleasure, or joy.

 

127. Things thus proceed, within metachemistry, from the criminality of the beautiful ego to the cruelty (possessiveness) of the loving soul via the evil of the expressive will and the barbarity of the fiery spirit.

 

128. Things thus proceed, within chemistry, from the punishment of the strong ego to the cleverness (adroitness) of the proud soul via the goodness of the compressive will and the civility of the watery spirit.

 

129. Things thus proceed, within physics, from the sinfulness of the knowledgeable ego to the stupidity (gravitas) of the pleasurable soul via the folly of the depressive will and the naturalness of the vegetative spirit.

 

130. Things thus proceed, within metaphysics, from the gracefulness of the truthful ego to the kindness (light-heartedness) of the joyful soul via the wisdom of the impressive will and the culture of the airy spirit.

 

131. It is as if things proceeded, within a noumenally objective trinity, from the daughter of universal metachemical ego to the daughter of polyversal/universal metachemical psyche via the mother of diabolic will and the unclear spirit of Hell.

 

132. As if things proceeded, within a phenomenally objective trinity, from the daughter of personal chemical ego to the daughter of impersonal/personal chemical psyche via the mother of feminine will and the clear spirit of purgatory.

 

133. As if things proceeded, within a phenomenally subjective trinity, from the son of personal physical ego to the son of impersonal/personal physical psyche via the father of masculine will and the unholy spirit of earth.

 

134. As if things proceeded, within a noumenally subjective trinity, from the son of universal metaphysical ego to the son of polyversal/universal metaphysical psyche via the father of divine will and the holy spirit of Heaven.

 

135. Thus the only context in which the so-called 'Holy Trinity' has any relevance is the metaphysical one of noumenal subjectivity, wherein we can speak of Son - Father - Holy Spirit, both in relation to the 'once-born' metaphysics of the theocratic 'kingdom without' and, more profoundly, in relation to the 'reborn' metaphysics of the meritocratic 'kingdom within', which has less to do, in sensuality, with the airwaves than, in sensibility, with the breath.

 

136. Therefore only in relation to air, whether sensually with regard to the ears or sensibly with regard to the lungs, is there any possibility of holy spirit, the airy spirit of metaphysical subjectivity. The holy spirit of Heaven only comes upon those who are either listening (preferably to music) or meditating (upon the breath), and it comes upon the latter more profoundly, through sensibility, than upon the former.

 

137. Both of the vegetative contexts of phenomenal subjectivity, corresponding to phallus and to brain, have reference to a trinity in which spirit is unholy, since such selflessness issues from physical and therefore foolish organs of not-self, and is accordingly natural rather than cultural, the earthly spirit of a masculine father.

 

138. Even the physicality of subjectivity in the plutocratic 'kingdom within' can only be described in terms, necessarily phenomenal, of Son - Father - Unholy Spirit, since the Son, corresponding to self, is less graceful here than sinful, the Father less wise here than foolish, and the Unholy Spirit less airy here than vegetative in its cogitative or prayerful nature, with a consequence that the soul (which reacts from such a spirit) is less kind than stupid, less gay than grave, less light than heavy.

 

139. Yet if the phenomenal trinity of vegetative physics implies an unholy shortfall from the noumenal trinity of airy metaphysics, then that which is neither phenomenally subjective nor noumenally subjective but objective in either noumenal or phenomenal terms ... cannot be described in relation to an Unholy Spirit, much less the Holy Spirit, but only, as I have maintained, in relation to an Unclear Spirit (if noumenal) or to a Clear Spirit (if phenomenal), both of which stand apart from anything male, since concerned with a female relationship between Daughter and Mother, self and not-self, together with its selfless complement, in due objective terms.

 

140. Thus we cannot entertain notions of Son - Father - Holy Spirit or of Son - Father - Unholy Spirit with metachemistry or chemistry, fire or water, but only notions of Daughter - Mother - Unclear Spirit in the metachemical context or of Daughter - Mother - Clear Spirit in the chemical one.

 

141. If the concept of Son - Father - Unholy Spirit is unconventional in relation to the more conventional notion of Son - Father - Holy Spirit (though even here my philosophically-conditioned order of symbols differs from that of conventional religious practice), then how much more unconventional are the notions of Daughter - Mother - Unclear Spirit for the noumenal objectivity of metachemistry on the one hand, and of Daughter - Mother - Clear Spirit for the phenomenal objectivity of chemistry on the other hand!

 

142. If those who imagine that the conventional trinity of Son - Father - Holy Spirit suffices for the Christian realm of vegetative 'rebirth' are mistaken, how much more mistaken would be those who conceive of such a trinity in relation to watery or to fiery orders of 'rebirth', never mind the more prevalent 'once-born' contexts, affirming sensuality, of metachemistry and chemistry, corresponding, in organic terms, to the eyes and to the tongue.

 

143. No, neither the eyes nor the heart, nor even the tongue or the womb, corresponding to noumenal and to phenomenal levels of objective sensuality and sensibility respectively, have anything to do with holiness, and those who persist in imagining the contrary not only deceive themselves, but are guilty of subverting and corrupting religion.

 

144. As, up to a point, are those who would conceive of holiness in relation to the phallus or to the brain in vegetative sensuality and sensibility, and are therefore guilty of hyping their phenomenal limitations (in mass and volume) to a degree which marginalizes, if not effectively excludes, genuine holiness.

 

145. Even those who, in their theocratic fundamentalism, uphold holiness in 'once-born' terms, as auditory sensuality through sequential time, leave something to be desired, and that something is the 'reborn' holiness that, corresponding to the metaphysical 'kingdom within', requires transcendental meditation to ensure that respiratory sensibility through spaced space has the final say.

 

146. For nothing short of meritocratic transcendentalism can save people, effectively theocrats, from the 'once-born' metaphysics of the 'kingdom without' to the 'reborn' metaphysics of the 'kingdom within', and such a salvation will only be possible in 'Kingdom Come', the pseudo-Kingdom and genuine Centre which the Second Coming (and effective Superchrist) wishes to establish not only at the expense of the metaphysical 'kingdom without' (of the theocratic Father), but also at the expense of the physical 'kingdom within' (of the plutocratic Son), in order that the metaphysical 'kingdom within' (of the meritocratic Holy Spirit of Heaven) may come officially and universally to pass in the top tier of what I have elsewhere - see, for instance, Deistic Deliverance and Ultranotes from Beyond - described as the triadic Beyond.

 

147. Before I proceed any further, I should emphasize that, not for the first time in this text, I have been guilty of using a convenient generalization to advance a fresh perspective in connection with more immediately significant material, and that, much as this may have been strategically justified at the time, philosophical conscience now compels me to do justice to the truth by also allowing for a more precisely comprehensive perspective.

 

148. Thus since the per se of power is in metachemistry (as metachemical expression) and the per se of glory is in chemistry (as clear spirit), so that we have a distinction between not-self and selflessness, it stands to reason that generalizations to the effect that power and glory will be first-rate in metachemistry do not square with such a distinction, since glory is hardly in its per se manifestation there but, rather, is 'once bovaryized' and thus duly second-rate.

 

149. Hence, in metachemistry, we should distinguish between the first-rate power of the metachemically universal not-self and the second-rate glory of metachemical universal selflessness on the one hand, and contrast each of these with the third-rate form of the metachemically egocentric self and the fourth-rate content(ment) of the metachemically psychocentric self.

 

150. For where power is first-rate, as in metachemical expression, content(ment) will be fourth-rate, form third-rate, and glory second-rate, as the ratios of things proceed from most power to least content(ment) via more (relative to most) glory and less (relative to least) form.

 

151. Likewise, in chemistry, one should distinguish between the second-rate power of the chemically personal not-self and the first-rate glory of chemically personal selflessness on the one hand, and contrast each of these with the third-rate content(ment) of the chemically psychocentric self and the fourth-rate form of the chemically egocentric self.

 

152. For where glory is first-rate, as in clear spirit, power will be second-rate, content(ment) third-rate, and form fourth-rate, as the ratios of things proceed from more (relative to most) power to less (relative to least) content(ment) via most glory and least form.

 

153. Similarly, in physics, one should distinguish between the third-rate power of the physically personal not-self and the fourth-rate glory of physically personal selflessness on the one hand, and contrast each of these with the second-rate content(ment) of the physically psychocentric self and the first-rate form of the physically egocentric self.

 

154. For where form is first-rate, as in egocentric sinfulness, content(ment) will be second-rate, power third-rate, and glory fourth-rate, as the ratios of things proceed from less (relative to least) power to more (relative to most) content(ment) via least glory and most form.

 

155. Finally, in metaphysics, one should distinguish between the fourth-rate power of the metaphysically universal not-self and the third-rate glory of metaphysically universal selflessness on the one hand, and contrast each of these with the second-rate form of the metaphysical egocentric self and the first-rate content(ment) of the metaphysical psychocentric self on the other hand.

 

156. For where content(ment) is first-rate, as in psychocentric kindness, form will be second-rate, glory third-rate, and power fourth-rate, as the ratios of things proceed from least power to most content(ment) via less (relative to least) glory and more (relative to most) form.

 

157. Of course, things don't literally proceed from power to content(ment) via glory and form, since this is simply with regard to the structural ratios of the various components, but, rather, from form to content(ment) via power and glory, as from egocentric self to psychocentric self via somatic not-self and what I should like to call psychesomatic selflessness (the spiritual emanation from the not-self).

 

158. And, proceeding thus, we know that form is only in its per se manifestation in physics, content(ment) only in its per se manifestation in metaphysics, power only in its per se manifestation in metachemistry, and glory only in its per se manifestation in chemistry.

 

159. Knowing which, there can be no doubt that the ego, corresponding to form, is only in its per se manifestation in vegetation; that the soul, corresponding to content(ment), is only in its per se manifestation in air; that the will, corresponding to power, is only in its per se manifestation in fire; and that the spirit, corresponding to glory, is only in its per se manifestation in water.

 

160. A society that wants perfect power will accordingly be built around fire in due metachemically expressive fashion; a society that wants perfect glory will accordingly be built around water in due chemically clear fashion; while a society, by (gender) contrast, that wants perfect form will accordingly be built around vegetation in due physically sinful vein; and, last but hardly least, a society that wants perfect content(ment) will accordingly be built around air in due metaphysically lighthearted vein.

 

161. The powerful society will affirm will through fire, the glorious society affirm spirit through water, and both alike will be predominantly objective, and hence female, in their respective ways. Conversely, the formal society will affirm ego through vegetation, the content(ment) society affirm soul through air, and both alike will be preponderantly subjective, and hence male, in their respective ways.

 

162. Science rules in the powerful society, politics governs in the glorious society; economics represents in the formal society, and religion leads in the content(ment) society.

 

163. Regarded from the perspective of science, a religious society will be scientifically fourth-rate, an economic society scientifically third-rate, and a political society scientifically second-rate, since only in metachemistry is science first-rate.

 

164. Regarded from the perspective of politics, an economic society will be politically fourth-rate, a religious society politically third-rate, and a scientific society politically second-rate, since only in chemistry is politics first-rate.

 

165. Regarded from the perspective of economics, a political society will be economically fourth-rate, a scientific society economically third-rate, and a religious society economically second-rate, since only in physics is economics first-rate.

 

166. Regarded from the perspective of religion, a scientific society will be religiously fourth-rate, a political society religiously third-rate, and an economic society religiously second-rate, since only in metaphysics is religion first-rate.

 

167. Of course, what applies to society, which is a conglomeration of individuals sharing common ideals, ethics, nationality, etc., also applies to the individuals who constitute it, insofar as individuals are divisible into those for whom the will, and hence power, is paramount; those for whom the spirit, and hence glory, is paramount; those for whom the ego, and hence form, is paramount; and those for whom the soul, and hence content(ment), is paramount.

 

168. To some extent this is also attributable to the individual's gender, insofar as females tend to have a bias, in their predominantly objective dispositions (which diverge in sensuality and/or converge in sensibility in a straight line due to a vacuous precondition), towards will and spirit, whereas males tend, by contrast, to have a bias towards ego and soul, after the manner of their preponderantly subjective dispositions (which diverge in sensuality and/or converge in sensibility in a curved line due to a plenumous precondition).

 

169. Just as fire is the element of the will par excellence, so air, its noumenal antithesis, is the element of the soul par excellence, the heavenly element that is essential where fire is apparent.

 

170. Just as water is the element of the spirit par excellence, so vegetation (earth), its phenomenal antithesis, is the element of the ego par excellence, the mundane element that is qualitative where water is quantitative.

 

171. The elements thus proceed from appearance to essence via quantity and quality, as from will to soul via spirit and ego, or power to content(ment) via glory and form.

 

172. If power is first-rate in fire, where it is expressive in its noumenal objectivity, then it is second-rate in the phenomenally objective compressiveness of water, third-rate in the phenomenally subjective depressiveness of vegetation, and fourth-rate in the noumenally subjective impressiveness of air.

 

173. If glory is first-rate in water, where it is clear in its chemical spirituality, then it is second-rate in the metachemical unclearness of fire, third-rate in the metaphysical holiness of air, and fourth-rate in the physical unholiness of vegetation.

 

174. If form is first-rate in vegetation, where it is sinful in its knowledgeable egocentricity, then it is second-rate in the graceful egocentricity of air, third-rate in the criminal egocentricity of fire, and fourth-rate in the punishing egocentricity of water, as we descend from truth and beauty to strength.

 

175. If content(ment) is first-rate in air, where it is kind in its joyful psychocentricity, then it is second-rate in the stupid psychocentricity of vegetation, third-rate in the clever psychocentricity of water, and fourth-rate in the cruel psychocentricity of fire, as we descend from pleasure and pride to love.

 

176. Power accordingly descends from expression to impression via compression and depression, as from fire to air via water and vegetation in will.

 

177. Glory accordingly descends from clear to unholy via unclear and holy, as from water to vegetation via fire and air in spirit.

 

178. Form accordingly ascends from strength to truth via beauty and knowledge, as from water to air via fire and vegetation in ego.

 

179. Content(ment) accordingly ascends from love to joy via pride and pleasure, as from fire to air via water and vegetation in soul.

 

180. If will is most apparent in fire, it is more (relative to most) apparent in water, less (relative to least) apparent in vegetation, and least apparent in air.

 

181. If spirit is most quantitative in water, it is more (relative to most) quantitative in fire, less (relative to least) quantitative in air, and least quantitative in vegetation.

 

182. If ego is most qualitative in vegetation, it is more (relative to most) qualitative in air, less (relative to least) qualitative in fire, and least qualitative in water.

 

183. If soul is most essential in air, it is more (relative to most) essential in vegetation, less (relative to least) essential in water, and least essential in fire.

 

184. The self, as has been argued, is a composite of three factors, viz. the conscious mind, or intellectualized ego; the superconscious mind, or spiritualized ego; and the subconscious mind, or emotionalized ego. It is thus, in general terms, divisible between ego, mind, and soul, as between intellect, spirit, and emotion.

 

185. There is a sort of cause-and-effect relationship between the ego and the soul, in whatever element in both sensuality and sensibility, but it is not a direct relationship. Rather is it an indirect relationship in which the self, as cause, achieves soulful redemption for itself via the not-self and selflessness.

 

186. Hence ego does not directly but only indirectly causes soul, via the intermediate co-operation of the not-self and its selfless complement, the latter of which, as spirit, transmutes ego into mind and directly causes it to rebound from such a transmutation towards the emotional depths of the self, which is its soul.

 

187. Thus the ego is the effective cause of the will, the will is the direct cause of the spirit, the spirit is the direct effect of the will, and the mind is the causative effect of the spirit, an effect from which, in rejecting, the self rebounds to its soulful kernel before regaining its psychological equilibrium in the ego.

 

188. Thus whereas there is a direct cause-and-effect relationship between will and spirit, power and glory, there is no such relationship between ego and soul since, together with the mind, they are different manifestations of the same thing - namely the self, which is neither its own cause nor its own effect but, rather, the effective cause and causative effect of both the not-self and selflessness.

 

189. Thus self is truly 'Three-in-One', and this 'One', corresponding to ego/mind/soul, stands apart from the causal not-self of the will and the effective selflessness of the spirit as 'Son' from 'Father' and 'Holy Ghost'.

 

190. At least this is so of the metaphysical context of noumenal subjectivity in both sensuality and sensibility, but not, as has been argued, of physical, chemical, and metachemical contexts, where 'ghosts' or 'spirits' which are unholy, clear, and unclear have ever to be reckoned with!